Reviews written by Brian Robinson

165 results - showing 76 - 100
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Faux Absinthe
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     March 05, 2010
Overall rating 
 
1.0
Appearance 
 
1.0
Louche 
 
1.0
Aroma 
 
1.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
1.0
Finish 
 
1.0
Overall 
 
1.0

Anticeptic or absinthe?

Color: Radioactive bluish greenish.

Louche: None expected. It lived up to its expectations.

Aroma: Minty fresh. Like mouthwash.

Taste: Also very similar to mouthwash. Both in regards to flavor and burn.

Finish: Heat.

Overall: If this product didn't prey on uneducated consumers looking for high thujone products, it would never sell. It's not absinthe. If you buy it, you'll probably be disappointed.

Faux Absinthe
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     March 05, 2010
Overall rating 
 
1.2
Appearance 
 
1.0
Louche 
 
1.0
Aroma 
 
2.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
1.0
Finish 
 
1.0
Overall 
 
1.0

Not good, but OK for Bohemian style.

Color: Not entirely different from Scope, or La Tournment Verte. That is to say, completely artificial looking.

Louche: What louche?

Aroma: HOT! Wow. Lot's of alcohol. A hint of bitterness.

Taste: Overwhelmingly bitter. Not enjoyable in the slightest.

Finish: More acrid astringency.

Overall: For Bohemian style, it's exactly what I'd expect it to be: terrible. It's by far, the worst of the La Fee line, although the entire line is mediocre to begin with.

Faux Absinthe
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     March 05, 2010
Overall rating 
 
1.5
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
1.0
Aroma 
 
2.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
1.0
Finish 
 
1.0
Overall 
 
1.0

Never, ever, ever again.

It took me a long time to review this product, mainly due to the bad experience I remember from the first time I tried it.

Color: Straw yellow with hints of green.

Louche: No anise, no fennel, no louche.

Aroma: Not a whole lot to make out here aside from a faint weedy character with just a touch of earthy sweetness.

Taste: Totally unacceptable. Very harsh and botheringly acrid. It's so astringent and bitter that it makes you catch your breath. Lots of alcohol burn.

Finish: Alcohol heat and lingering harsh bitterness.

Overall: I'm not surprised that it's hard to finda lot of advertising for this product any more. As more and more people become educated about what absinthe is/should be, less and less are falling for the gimmicks that brands like this are pulling.

Faux Absinthe
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     March 05, 2010
Overall rating 
 
1.8
Appearance 
 
2.0
Louche 
 
2.0
Aroma 
 
2.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
2.0
Overall 
 
1.0

Yikes.

I'd write a more formal review, but what's the point?

This is a huge departure from what absinthe is. It's basically flavored vodka. Completely unacceptable for an absinthe.

I'd never consider buying this when I'm in the market for absinthe.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     March 05, 2010
Overall rating 
 
2.4
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
1.0
Overall 
 
2.0

Not a fan.

Color: Artificial yet attractive.

Louche: Turbulent and pretty while louching. Post louche, it's a bit too thick and oily, like previously mentioned.

Aroma: Star anise and quite a bit of mint, citrus, and pine. Definitely a little warm. Peculiar is a perfect descriptor.

Flavor: Wormwood and pine. I don't know what that is, but man, LOTS of pine. A bit weedy and peppery. Wormwood is a bit harsh. I just don't like the wormwood used in oil mixes. Very powerful flavors.

Finish: Quite thick and numbing. Might be smoother if louched up at a higher ratio.

Overall: If you get a bottle of this, I highly recommend trying higher water ratios like 4:1 and 5:1. You'll probably enjoy it more. At the normal ratio of 3:1, it's got way too many harsh and unbalanced flavors.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     March 05, 2010
Last updated: March 05, 2010
Overall rating 
 
2.7
Appearance 
 
2.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
2.0
Overall 
 
2.0

I'll pass on this one until changes are made

Color: Golden amber. Not a hint of green. A bit surprised by that.

Louche: Fairly quick louche with nice layering. Ends up nice and thick, but it doesn't really look very attractive at the normal 3:1. It's a milky amber color. However, at the 5:1 mark (which is manufacturer suggested), it looks pretty nice. Hints of green and white come out.

Aroma: A tad warm. Lots of alcohol aroma before louched. Post-louche, it's much lighter than I would've thought. Hints of anise and wormwood. If the rating was based on pre-louche aroma, it would've received a 2.

Flavor: At 5:1, it's underwhelming. The anise tastes watered down. However, there's also hints of what seems to be macerated wormwood or wormwood oil, which are distracting. At the same time, I think the higher water ratio has eased up on what could be quite bitter wormwood if prepared at the normal ratio. It also tastes like it's pre-sweetened. It's certainly unbalanced.

Finish: It recedes extremely quick. You're left with nothing after just a few seconds. I need more flavor, but I'm afraid to louche at a lower ratio due to the wormwood bitterness.

Overall: Needs a lot of work. If they could distill it, take out the sugar, and take out the macerated wormwood/wormwood oil they used, and added high quality distilled green anise, it could be significantly better.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     March 05, 2010
Overall rating 
 
3.3
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Not bad for a first batch, but can be improved.

Color: No visible defect.

Louche: Very oily louche with lots of trails. Gradual clouding, fully louched by about 1:1 with ice-cold water from a fountain. It's ends up a lot thicker than I was anticipating based on what I was told. Still a little light compared to my favorite blanches, but not as bad as I was led to believe.

Aroma: Pre-louche, it's a little warm. Not surprising for a young absinthe. Vegetal with some sweetness. After louche, there's a hint of earthy sweetness along with some anise. I don't get a lot of wormwood at all, which is unfortunate. Light and fresh.

Flavor: A little thin. The producer explained to me that this batch came out lighter in flavor than they wanted, so I expect this to change in future batches. I hope that's the case. It's not bad right now, but it's so light, I kept thinking that I could stick it in lemonade as a summer refresher.

Finish: I pick up on the mintiness on the exhale as well. A bit of white pepper on the back of the tongue. Recedes a bit quicker than I would like. I also expect that to change.

Overall: Not bad. It's not my favorite blanche, and it certainly has some work to do, but it seems as though the producers know what needs to be done, and hopefully will make the tweaks necessary to keep this product competitive. I'd rank it below Clandestine, but above Kubler.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     February 20, 2010
Overall rating 
 
1.8
Appearance 
 
2.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
1.0
Finish 
 
1.0
Overall 
 
1.0

Stinging bitterness.

Color: A very pale straw color. Looks a lot like the tinted batches of Blanchette. Doesn't really resemble a verte.

Louche: Weak louche, but still interesting to watch. It does create a very noticeable layering effect and becomes fairly decent looking yet light after about 2 parts water.

Aroma: Lots of heat while unlouched. Some vegetal notes, but not any anise. Almost tart, like an aftershave. Peculiar is definitely a good word for it. After louche, it's quite grassy and weedy with just a touch of wormwood.

Flavor: Overpoweringly bitter and acrid. Obvious use of macerated wormwood. It actually stung the inside of my lips. Not at all pleasant. I can't taste any anise at all.

Finish: Grassy, weedy and woody with lots of lingering bitterness. Ouch. If I could score the finish a zero, I would.

Overall: Wow. This needs a LOT of work. I rarely sink absinthe, but this was just too hard to drink. They need to distill the wormwood and add more anise (if they started with any to begin with).

I had high hopes for this product, but was sorely disappointed. Back to the drawing board.

If I want an absinthe from Eastern Europe, I'd pick St. Antoine.

Reviewed by Brian Robinson     February 04, 2010
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Mmmmm.....

Color: A wonderful amber

Louche: Gradual clouding leading up to a nice layer effect at about 2:1. Ends with a gorgeous caramel color with hints of pink and green.

Aroma: Sweet anise plays well with the minty wormwood. A touch of spice and a lot of cognac and old books.

Flavor: The anise is a bit less pronounced than in the 1914 bottle I tried, but still noticable. The wormwood is more at the forefront than I'm used to as well. Not as balanced as some of the other vintage Pernod Fils I've had, but still delicious.

Finish: A little heat and a little bit of bitterness from the wormwood, but it is incredibly smooth and velvety when a touch more water is added (about 3:1).

Overall: It's always a treat to taste 100 year old absinthe. As always, I'm left wanting more. MUCH more.

Reviewed by Brian Robinson     December 17, 2009
Overall rating 
 
2.5
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
2.0
Overall 
 
2.0

What a disappointment

Color: A good hue, but regretably artificial.

Louche: Amazing trails, but the artificial coloring throws off the final product. Too heavy of a louche, which is expected given the levels of star anise.

Aroma: The characteristic acridity of star anise and alcohol heat. Not very inviting.

Flavor: The lack of wormwood is another major disappointment. Compared to Pre-ban Pernod, I'd be suprised if there was any wormwood in this at all. The star anise is cloying and one-dimensional. Pernod could do so much with this, but it seems like they just wanted to push a quick and easy product out the door.

Finish: quick, slightly acrid and unremarkable.

Overall: Given its pedigree, this is one of the biggest disappointments of the modern age of absinthe. I'd love to take the reigns on this project to do a complete overhaul.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     December 16, 2009
Last updated: December 28, 2009
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

A very nice blanche

Color: Very attractive. For blanches, if there are no visible defects, I normally give a 4 instead of a 5 in order to keep them on equal ground with vertes, which I rarely give a 5 for color either.

Louche: The star anise creates a pretty quick louche, but it looks quite nice. Shades of white, blue and pink dance around. Not too thin and not too thick. I only went 1.5:1 on the water ratio since the ABV is so low.

Aroma: Light and refreshing with hints of citrus, talc and confectioner's sugar.

Flavor: Unlike many Le Bleues, which are crisp, Sorciere is more on the sweeter, creamier side. Light and flowery with a bit more anise flavor than the verte. I'd look at this as more of a winter blanche compared to something like Blanchette as a summer refresher.

Finish: Very light with some nice sweetness. Using sugar would be overkill for this brand.

Overall: The brandy isn't as obtrusive in the Bleu as it is in the Verte. Which is nice, but also confusing, since the bleu is lighter in herbal flavor. You'd think the brandy would show through even more. The lack of overpowering brandy flavor is reflected in the score. This is a very well made, very enjoyable blanche. And I don't normally care for blanches.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     December 16, 2009
Overall rating 
 
3.4
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Quite good, but not without some minor flaws

Color: A bit light, but a nice color. Light olive with tinges of straw.

Louche: Nice layering. Fully louched by 2:1. A deep and thick louche with hints of blue and green.

Aroma: Distinct brandy aroma with hints of fennel and a touch of anise. I'd like to be able to pick out more wormwood, but it's still nice.

Flavor: Nice and light, but the brandy seems to be more of the focus than the herbs. I wonder if it went through a second distillation after maceration? Angelica and Hyssop come through, but again, not a lot of descernible wormwood. The brandy, while obviously of good quality (imparting some wood and old books to the flavor), takes control of the overall flavor profile. If it were toned down a bit, and the herbs were allowed to come to the forefront a bit more, I'd give it a 4.

Finish: The brandy is there, but the herbs assert themselves a bit more in the finish. Very clean and enjoyable with hints of holiday spices at the very end.

Overall: This is a nice drink. I quite like it. However, it does have its flaws. While the brandy tastes wonderful, it's a bit too assertive for my tastes. Also, I'd like to see a bit heavier of a hand for the coloration step to see a bit more green.

If they fixed those two issues, this would be a no-brainer to keep in stock in my bar.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     November 11, 2009
Last updated: November 10, 2010
Overall rating 
 
2.1
Appearance 
 
2.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
2.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
1.0
Overall 
 
2.0

I wish it were better

Color: Obvious artificial coloration. Bright green. Kind of scary.

Louche: As with many anise heavy absinthes, the louche develops well. Maybe a bit too fast.

Aroma: Lots of heat and base alcohol. Quite a bit of cloying anise.

Flavor: Overpowering anise numbs the tongue thoroughly. I really can't make out much wormwood or anything else for that matter.

Finish: Very oily and unpleasant.

Overall: Yet another offering from La Fee that seems to try to cut corners and cheapen the category. There's no reason to spend such money for a cheaply made product like this when you can buy a naturally colored, authentic absinthe. Sorry La Fee, this isn't one I'd buy again.

Reviewed by Brian Robinson     October 28, 2009
Last updated: December 29, 2009
Overall rating 
 
4.4
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Another great artisinal offering

Color: Nice Peridot green with hints of yellow.

Louche: Nice trails and a decent build, but a tad light for me when finished. I might have received one of the earlier batches though. Apparently later batches have a thicker louche.

Aroma: Crisp, alpine freshness. Extremely clean and inviting.

Flavor: a great representation of the style. Not too overexertive in any certain area. A great balance.

Finish: well balanced and mild

Overall: A wonderfully light, feminine absinthe. Great for a hot day. But I'd drink it anytime.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     September 24, 2009
Last updated: February 20, 2010
Overall rating 
 
3.8
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
3.0

A HUGE improvement from the first two batches

UPDATED Review based on batch 4.:


Color: A very nice peridot green. Much brighter and inviting that the first two batches, which were over colored, in my opinion.
v3 score: 4
v4 score: 4

Louche: Very nice trails and deeply formed overall louche. Hints of green and blue.
v3 score: 4
v4 score: 4

Aroma: Nice hints of wormwood, green and star anise, and the everpresent veronica. This batch actually has a hint of rootbeer when unlouched. Spicy, in a good way.
v3 score: 3
v4 score: 4

Flavor: Flowery and refreshing with lots of the wormwood coming through. Thicker than batch 3 so I recommend a bit more water. White pepper spiciness with some sweet anise and even some violettes. v4 is a bit more heavy and savory.
v3 score: 4
v4 score: 4

Finish: The numbing of v3 has been reduced, but is still there a bit. The spiciness sticks around for a while.
v3 score: 4
v4 score: 4

Overall: If the numbing was toned down a bit, I would have given the overall score a 4, but since this is an improvement I'd recommend, it would fit within the definition of a 3.
v3 score: 3
v4 score: 3

Note: This absinthe (v3) was also reviewed very favorably by other WS members during the Green Weekend of September 12th, 2009.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     August 10, 2009
Overall rating 
 
3.3
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Quirky and unusual, but enjoyable

Color: absolutely clear

Aroma: before water, there seems to be quite a bit of cinnamon and spice, but that might actually be part of the base spirit as opposed to any spices they may have added. The star anise is quite pungent. After water, it becomes more citrussy and floral with almost a dairy-like silkiness. The honey distillate base is quite obvious.

Louche: Literally begins the moment the first drop of water hits. Still quite thick at 3:1m which is suprising for its alcohol content. It's attractive, but I'd actually penalize it for the quickness and thickness of the louche. Obviously the star anise plays a big part here.

Flavor: Surprisingly light. You've definitely got the star anise there, but you also have some 'rooty' qualities like with Gentiane, as well as a menthol-like cooling sensation which follows the wormwood's dryness (which is present, but light). It's quirky, but tasty and refreshing. There is a hint of sweetness from the mead as well. I do miss the green anise though, which I think would work better than the star. At 3.5:1, the anise gets toned down a lot and you're left with the vegetal and citrus hints along with the cooling.

Finish: Here's where you definitely feel the cooling sensation, along with hyssop and some citrus. Quite complex.

Overall: Overall, this is an enjoyable beverage. It's definitely not your traditional absinthe profile, so it's going to have its detractors. I like it better than the St. George though. It's not on the same level as something like CLB, but it's enjoyable. I don't know if I like the menthol sensation, so I'd be hard pressed to buy a bottle. But if it were made available to me, I'd happily accept a glass.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     May 01, 2009
Overall rating 
 
2.7
Appearance 
 
2.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
2.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Wow. Not in a good way.

Color: Very light. Almost seems like a flawed blanche.

Louche: Very thick and turbulent louche, beginning immediately. Good layering. It almost seems artificially enhanced.

Aroma: all alcohol heat and anise. Quite unbalanced.

Flavor: Anise and some wormwood. Quite basic. A small twinge of unpleasant bitterness.

Finish: recedes quickly except for some peppery spiciness.

Overall: Entirely basic. They need to really review their coloration methods, as they have been found wanting. It really seemed like I was drinking a blanche.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     May 01, 2009
Overall rating 
 
2.4
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
1.0
Overall 
 
2.0

On the lower end of US offerings

Color: A pale greenish yellow.

Louche: Unlike other reviews, I got a pretty decent louche with lots of greens, blues and whites.

Aroma: Very herbal. I pick up cinnamon and flowers, but with a tinge of something like vinegar. No real wormwood or anise.

Flavor: Biting acridity and bitterness. There are hints of sweetness at the forefront, but followed by highly astringent and bitter flavors. It's tough to even finish the sample size I poured.

Finish: Same acrid flavors are present in the finish. Luckily it doesn't last that long.

Overall: If you're stuck with a bottle, you might want to try it with a lot of sugar. It might help. I'd never buy it though.

Retired Brands
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     May 01, 2009
Overall rating 
 
3.2
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Average

Color: Green, but very light. Could use some work.

Louche: Builds nicely and ends up attractive, but not remarkably so.

Aroma: A little hear at 3:1 and a touch of mustiness. Not offputting, but not appetizing either.

Flavor: There's some sweetness that doesn't really remind me of anise, more like butterscotch mixed with anise instead. Not a fan of the wormwood here. I think better herbs would help this brand. Overall, a fairly basic flavor profile.

Finish: A bit astringent and bitter, but not bad. Anise lingers and produces some numbing.

Overall: This absinthe has potential. It's not very good now, but with a few tweaks, it could end up being very enojoyable. I'm surprised this absinthe won a medal at the Absinthiades.

Retired Brands
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     May 01, 2009
Last updated: May 02, 2009
Overall rating 
 
3.9
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
2.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

I want more

This absinthe is all about one thing: featuring wormwood. Man, did it deliver.

Louche: Understandably, there wasn't much louche at all.

Aroma: HUGE Pontarlier Wormwood aroma. If you need an example of what Pontalier WW smells like, this is as good as you'll find.

Flavor: Rich, smooth and creamy with not much more than the wonderful wormwood bitterness in play. Very clean and crisp. Sugar will help to bring out the other flavors, but I'd rather not!

Finish: The WW taste lasts forever.

Overall: It's certainly not a balanced absinthe, but it was never intended to be. This was a celebration of the flowery, minty goodness of Pontarlier wormwood. I'm just upset there won't be any more.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     May 01, 2009
Overall rating 
 
4.1
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Another enjoyable verte

Color: A very nice, vibrant peridot green.

Louche: Great louche build. Completely louched by about 2:1. Deep, opalescent and vibrant with tints of green still showing through. Very nice.

Aroma: an appetizing blend of ansie sweetness with some earthiness and a bit of peppery spice.

Flavor: Quite sweet, even without sugar. A nice dose of white pepper spice at the back of the tongue. Nice wormwood, but I'd like it to be a tad bit more prominant.

Finish: I pick up the wormwood a bit more on the finish as it plays nicely witht he anise. Some definite anethole numbing, with some warmth going down the throat.

Overall: Quite enjoyable! Definitely a keeper. A smart buy for anyone looking for a traditional absinthe profile.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     April 25, 2009
Last updated: April 28, 2009
Overall rating 
 
3.5
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

A second blanche from Bezençon

Color: Clear and natural. Disclosure: For blanches, if there are no visible defects, I give a 4 instead of a 5. I only reserve a 5 score for perfectly colored Vertes, as it's more difficult to achieve and I like to reward that.

Louche: Quicker to louche than the La Valote. Attractive but not a lot of layering, more general clouding. Fully louched around 1:1. A tad bit thicker than the La Valote, but not as thick as CLB.

Aroma: More earthiness than the La Valote. Maybe some Genepy? Quite nice.

Flavor: Lighter and less spicy than the La Valote. Everything is in balance, but nothing is really popping out at me. Almost a little watery at 2:1. I think sugar would totally overwhelm this absinthe.

Finish: Pleasant and correct. What I would expect from a blanche. I'd like the flavor to linger more, but it's not bad in the slightest.

Overall: As with the La Valote, this blanche is pretty straight forward. I'd put it in the same class as (maybe a bit higher than) Kubler. Based on a price point of around $40, this is a very good buy for a blanche. My recommendation: If you like a spicier blanche, check out the La Valote. If you like a lighter, sweeter blanche, check this one out.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     April 25, 2009
Last updated: April 28, 2009
Overall rating 
 
3.7
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Another decent blanche in the US

Color: Clear, no visible sediment. Disclosure: For blanches, if there are no visible defects, I give a 4 instead of a 5. I only reserve a 5 score for perfectly colored Vertes, as it's more difficult to achieve and I like to reward that.

Louche: Nice layering. Quick to start. Fully louched by about 1:1. The final color is attractive and opaque, but not as deep as something like CLB.

Aroma: Sweet and light with some earthiness. A typical blanche aroma, but a bit more muted than some.

Flavor: Well balanced but fairly light in flavor. There is a nice spiciness towards the end.

Finish: Not a lot of anise or wormwood, but the spice stays around for a little while. I'd like the flavor to hang around longer.

Overall: Not a bad drink at all, yet a bit basic. It's a little to lightly flavored for me. The only thing I really pick up is the spiciness. Everything else is pretty muted. Price point is coming in around $50, which makes this a good buy.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Brian Robinson     April 23, 2009
Overall rating 
 
2.2
Appearance 
 
2.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
2.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
2.0
Overall 
 
2.0

At least you taste some anise...

Color: Vibrant, but very obviously artificial. My bottle is several years old and is as bright as the day I brought it home.

Louche: Very thick and quick. Probably artificially enhanced.

Aroma: Some alcohol heat and some anise. CLoyingly sweet.

Flavor: Candy-like, with a bitter aftertaste, which I'm assuming came from the oils used to mix.

Finish: I still can't get over the bitterness.

Overall: Better than expected, but I wouldn't put this on my list of enjoyable, everyday absinthes. It would probably work fairly well in mixed drinks that call for anisette.

Reviewed by Brian Robinson     March 21, 2009
Last updated: March 21, 2009
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

Unbelievable

Color: A wonderfully deep, pinkish amber.

Louche: Using ice cold water from a fountain and my Simon Pierce bubble glass, the louche began building almost immediately. The tendrils of milky pink louche wound its way from the top of the glass into the globe in an intoxicating dance. A beauty to behold.

Aroma: Sweet with the hint of very old cognac and leather. Flowery anise with a touch of pepper and minty wormwood. Just from the nose, you realize that sugar would be overkill. Not that I sugar my absinthe anyway.

Flavor: It's truly amazing what 100 years of aging can do to an absinthe. Even still, you can tell that this product was representative of what would have been the gold standard of absinthe during the Belle Epoque. Something that has aged into a flavor this good had to have started out amazing to begin with. It was so silky on the tongue and so smooth as it went down. The aging has melded the flavors so well that it's difficult to pull too much out other than the anise and wormwood, but those were obviously of top quality. Even without sugar, there was a 'juicy fruit' sweetness that danced on the tongue from the first sip to the last. Absolutely wonderful stuff.

Finish: The finish lingered, but was light and ephemeral, just hinting at an urge to take the next sip. Just a touch of anise and a maple sweetness that played with the heavenly mustiness of the grape base.

Overall: I don't know what else to say. It's awe inspiring. There's no other like it. I want to break into my entire stash now. Must...resist...

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