Reviews written by khiddy

11 results - showing 1 - 11
 
 
Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by khiddy     March 12, 2009
Last updated: March 12, 2009
Overall rating 
 
2.2
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
1.0
Finish 
 
1.0
Overall 
 
1.0

Monty Deuxieme Edition: Petroleum base?

Deuxieme Edition bottle opened 2/18/09, sugared sample reviewed 2/20/09, unsugared review sampled 3/11/09.

The color in the glass is a very light emerald, mildly attractive. The nose pre-louche is maple syrup and cinnamon with an alcohol backer. It louches up nicely, with good layering and "oil trails", fully louched by 1.5:1. Tasting at that point revealed that the alcohol was much too strong, so I continued watering it before consuming.

The first taste at 3.5:1 left a strong note of petroleum, both in the nose and on the tongue. It tastes strongly like Ronson brand lighter fluid smells. It's highly unpleasant. The finish is tart and oily on the sides of the tongue.

As a control, I made sure that the water and ice I'd used to louche were not compromised in any way. They tasted fine on their own, totally neutral. Can you tell I don't like this edition? The two samples were consistent tasting, both with and without sugar.

On a side note, I found that the cork was darkened by the absinthe about 0.25" (1cm) in from the bottom. Perhaps this bottle was stored on its side prior to shipping, and I am experiencing the effects of cork ruin. I will revisit this review after more exploration.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by khiddy     February 13, 2009
Overall rating 
 
3.3
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Pleasant, Middle of the Pack Offering

Pouring the Siréne into my glass, my first thought was, "too dark!" It looks like a rich Extra Virgin Olive Oil, dark and thick. The aroma neat was citrus and alcohol, reminding me in some ways of a gin.

It was the louche that made me sit up and take note. The icewater dripping into the glass produced marvelous oil trails, and a rich fog began to form at the bottom of the glass. As the louche continued, it grew ever more roiling and thundercloudish, with a tint of the olive and an unexpected tan highlight. The color wasn't the most attractive, but the action of the louche was quite appealing.

The aroma after louching was grassy, vegetal, and tangy. Flavor followed the aroma, with vegetal notes highlighted with wormwood bittnerness. Anise/fennel was in the background. The finish was dry, and somewhat short.

It was the next night, when I used Siréne as the base for an Absinthe Frappé, that I found the perfect use for this beverage. The strong louching of Siréne made for a very appealing cocktail, and the vegetal notes get toned down with the addition of the simple syrup and bitters. I think I found a good mixing absinthe!

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by khiddy     February 09, 2009
Overall rating 
 
4.4
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
5.0

A favorite daily drinker

The color in the glass is amazingly bright and clear, having a gem-like quality. It louches up nicely, keeping a tinge of green that is quite attractive. The louche builds from the bottom, with a layer of green at the top of the glass. Though it's thick enough at 2:1, I usually use a 3.5 or 4:1 ratio to open it up even more, and to provide an additional few sips per glass. It doesn't fall apart at higher water:dose ratios, either. I've had it unsugared, but I prefer it with because I think it thickens up the mouthfeel in a very positive way, without being too cloying.

The aroma is delightful, sweetness accompanied by a bit of wormwood and a detectable anise/fennel. The first sip gives a butterscotch richness, with the middle and back of the tongue sensing the slight bitter & dryness of wormwood. The anise flavor is present, if light. The finish is refreshingly cool, minty and bitter at the same time. A slight amount of tongue-drying accompanies the finish, but not as much as in some other wormwood-forward absinthes.

I love this product. At the price ($65 per bottle), it's an amazing value, cheap enough to be a daily drinker. I keep one bottle open and one in reserve because I know I'm going to be going back day in and day out.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by khiddy     January 29, 2009
Overall rating 
 
3.4
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
3.0

A well-made, Wormwood-forward Verte

Bottle opened 1/09, review glasses louched 1/09.

Color: A very solid green, looks natural, not too deep, closer to emerald than olive. Clear and bright.

Louche: Excellent "oil trails" lead to a gradual clouding of the glass from the bottom, with a thin line of green at the top. Completely louched at just over 2:1. Color after louche is a marvelous olive green. I would've liked to see more roiled clouds than this produces, but it's impossible to fault the louche for that.

Aroma: Wormwood, a bit of mint, a bit of alcohol heat.

Flavor: I tried my Duplais Verte unsugared at first, and it was a bit too wormwood-forward for my palate. The bitterness isn't offensive, but it isn't as floral and welcoming as I prefer. Adding about a tablespoon (15mL) of simple syrup and watering to 3.5:1 helps considerably, but it still remains unbalanced. It's hard to discern the anise through the wormwood, though I do detect the hint of mint. It has great mouth-feel, quite creamy.

Finish: Long. Bitter, but in a pleasant way.

Overall: I'm disappointed in Duplais Verte, it's too wormwood-forward for my taste. It's obviously well made, but I'm just not a fan. I'll revisit the bottle every now and then to see how both it and I have changed, but for now, it sits at the back of the shelf.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by khiddy     December 31, 2008
Overall rating 
 
3.3
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
2.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

A delight for the eyes that intrigues the palate

Bottle purchased and opened February 2006, review sample louched December 2008.

Serpis 65. What does one say? It's red, and it's heavy on the anise. Neat, it gives an aroma that is quite intriguing - alcohol accompanied by something like citrus and flowers, but not any flower you can identify. The color is striking - clear as crystal, like a red/orange candy diamond ring. Then the water is applied, and it turns peach. A beautiful, alluring peach. The aroma doesn't change, but gets smoothed out a bit - the alcohol drops into the background, and the flower/citrus aroma dominates.

The taste is bitter, wormwood, and anise. The finish is bitter and dry, and makes you want to take another sip to mitigate the bitterness. Sugar doesn't remove the bitterness, but I can't really imagine drinking this without sugar, it would be too damn bitter. It's surprising, but not unpleasant. The finish is long-lasting.

This is one of the strangest absinthes to have in your collection, but it represents a real value. The bottle is 1 Liter, and sells for less than $40 (plus shipping). Every connoisseur ought to have at least one bottle for the novelty.

Reviewed by khiddy     December 24, 2008
Overall rating 
 
4.8
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

A Superb Beverage for Sippin' and Mixin'

Bottle purchased November 2008, sample(s) louched November & December 2008.

Marteau Absinthe de la Belle Epoque has been a long time in preparation, and the wait has been worth it! I picked up my first bottle at the distillery release party, when I had my first small sample served by the hand of Mr. Stone. It was alluring in small sips, and I couldn't wait to get home and try a full glass.

In the glass neat, Marteau is a beautiful green, somewhere between olive and emerald in color. The pre-louche aroma has notes of orange, cream, and coffee. I take my absinthe sugared, and cold water dripped over the spoon creates marvelous "oil trails" that start at the bottom of the glass and build slowly until a 2:1 dilution is achieved. There is a marked line of separation between the louched/unlouched alcohol, and it fills the room with a creamy, anise-y aroma.

Others have noted that Marteau is an absinthe that can be diluted with varying amounts of water to great effect. This very evening I have had a glass at 4:1 which was spicy and quite enjoyable. Afterwards, I louched up a glass at 5.5:1,. and it was even creamier on the tongue, with a bit less alcohol bite.

The first sip is very intriguing. The expected wormwood bitterness is apparent, yet it quickly recedes and fennel's sweetness moves to the forefront. Mid-palate is a delightful mintiness, while on the finish, I detect the wormwood again, backed by sweetness. There is no end to the flavors, and they work very well in concert.

This is one marvelous beverage to sip. It also is excellent as a rinse for Sazeracs and other absinthe cocktails. Highly recommended!

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by khiddy     December 18, 2008
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Surprising Finish to a Promising Start

Sample louched December 2008, from an unknown bottling (it was a gift in trade). Louched to 4:1, with 1/2 sugar cube.

The color when neat is a perfect light green, which louches up beautifully. The louche begins at the very bottom of the reservoir, and builds fairly slowly from the bottom, until about 2:1, when just a thin line separates the unlouched top layer from the other 7/8 of the glass. It doesn't go completely milky until just short of 3:1.

The aroma when neat is a slightly minty alcohol. During the louche, it fills the room with anise, and quite noticeably so. Upon stirring, the aroma sniffed up close reminds me of Egg Nog, and in a very good way - it's milky, boozy, and quite alluring. It could just be that I sampled it the week before Christmas, but this definitely has notes of cream, nutmeg, and smoky bourbon.

The first taste is quickly mint, then fennel/anise, then a long finish of very bitter wormwood. The wormwood stays with you for quite a while, until you take another sip just to mitigate the bitter. I really didn't enjoy it as much as I expected I would.

The Edouard surprised me with just how bitter it is on the finish. It's reminiscent, as another reviewer noted, of Lucid, though much less "earthy" than Lucid. It's not difficult to taste the family resemblance, both being Ted Breaux productions. I need to try the others in the line, but Edouard didn't strike me (admittedly with my first sample) as one I'd buy a whole bottle of.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by khiddy     December 15, 2008
Overall rating 
 
4.2
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Cream of the Blanche Crop?

Bottle purchased October 2008, review sample louched December 2008.

The presentation of CLB is absolutely top-notch. The blue bottle is distinctive, the label is beautiful, and from the first impression you begin to think this will be a wonderful glass to share with friends.

Neat, CLB presents pine forest with a bit of alcohol heat. Upon introducing the water drip (I sugared mine), I began to smell caramel and juniper. This aroma remained until about 2.5-3:1, after which the caramel dropped into the background and the forest aroma reasserted itself. I finished at a 4.5:1 ratio, which produced a room-filling aroma.

The first sip is full in the mouth, almost creamy, with tastes of juniper and a tangy something that borders on shoyu soy sauce - a marvelous, full flavor that makes your tongue ask, "Hey! What the hell is that!" Subsequent sips taste different each time, as the slight numbing effect begins to build. This is a pleasant experience that intrigues as much as it intoxicates.

The finish is long - tangy, ever-so-slightly bitter, and, again, numbing. CLB doesn't just disappear. It stays for a while.

I must say, with only Kubler and some Spanish absentas to compare, the Clandestine is heads-and-shoulders above the blanches I've tried. Well worth the investment, this bottle will make a worthy compliment to any Absintheur's collection.

Faux Absinthe
Reviewed by khiddy     December 05, 2008
Last updated: December 08, 2008
Overall rating 
 
1.5
Appearance 
 
1.0
Louche 
 
2.0
Aroma 
 
2.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
1.0
Overall 
 
1.0

An intriguing drink, but is this Absinthe?

Bottle purchased April 2008, review based on sample consumed December 2008.

This is an entertaining, if not authentic, drink. My wife brought it home from the liquor store, her having been talked into it by an employee that I assume has since been sacked. I read the reviews before I opened it up, and had a sense of gloom that my wife had been taken for a ride.

Tasting this "absinthe" didn't allay my fears. As many others have noted, it presents a blue-green Scope mouthwash homage. The pre-louche nose is bright peppermint, a very slight touch of anise, and sweetness. Nothing traditional in the nose at all.

A very weak louche can be coaxed out of the LTV with a super-slow drip of very cold water. The louche is very thin, and the color ends up a muted blue-green, as you might expect. The nose post-louche turns mainly mint, with all of the anise disappearing. Sweetness continues to present itself, and you continue to think of Scope mouthwash.

The taste is mint, with a fullness in the center of the tongue that reminds me of the "fifth taste" - umami. It's not definable, other than saying it's a full, round taste that fills out the mint. It's not an absinthe taste by any stretch of the imagination, but it's not unpleasant, either. It's just... weird.

Overall, you can't characterize this as an absinthe. It belongs, perhaps, in the liqueur category, because of the sweetness and the odd flavor. It also has a relatively low ABV (50%), which is obvious, as you never notice the alcohol. Perhaps this would make an interesting cocktail ingredient for something presented in a martini glass - the weak louche and minty taste might compliment a chocolate or lemon vodka?

Reviewed by khiddy     December 05, 2008
Last updated: December 31, 2008
Overall rating 
 
2.5
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
2.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
2.0
Overall 
 
2.0

An Unremarkable Single-Note Beverage

Bottle first opened August 2007, current review based on December 2008 sample. [edit: bottle actually purchased 2007, not 2008 as originally noted.]

At first pour of the Pernod AEDPDA, the color is so impressively green that confirms the artificial augmentation. It's beautifully clear, however, and presents well. The nose is single-note anise, with a hot alcohol blast that burns the nostrils.

Loucheing at a medium drip (unsugared) produces a beautiful cascade of oil trails, with clouds that build from the bottom of the reservoir and keep a strong dividing line until almost 3:1. The green tinge remains in the fully-louched drink. The aroma is present, if not "room-filling". At least at this point the alcohol heat is tempered.

The first sip presents the anise again, with a touch of wormwood. It's not very tongue-numbing, nor particularly long-finished. It's simply a quick taste and then... little or nothing. Others have noted a touch of lemon on the finish, but I didn't notice it in my sample. Perhaps bottle age or a tweak of the recipe can explain this.

This is, overall, an unimpressive beverage, not one I'd share with a friend or a newbie. Compared with other absinthes currently available on American shelves, it comes up short. Too hot, too one-dimensional, too expensive for what you get.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by khiddy     July 29, 2008
Overall rating 
 
2.9
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
2.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Unimpressive start

The color is very pale, almost non-existent - somewhere between straw and emerald. The louche is very quick, oil trails are present, but there is no line of separation, nor any apparent method to the louche. The nose is fragrant, almost minty, but smells strongly of alcohol. The taste is hot, alcohol forward, with the mintiness continuing. The bitterness is pleasant, but what immediately takes over is the tongue-numbing effect. The finish is extremely short, with only the bittnerness lingering.



The overall impression one gets is that this is a young product, too quickly rushed to market. Perhaps future batches will prove fuller and less imperious.

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