Reviews written by retrogarde

5 results - showing 1 - 5
 
 
Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by retrogarde     May 18, 2009
Overall rating 
 
2.2
Appearance 
 
2.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
2.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
2.0
Overall 
 
2.0

I'll never drink it again

Since it was on the menu I thought I'd get a glass so that I could review it. The bartender told me it was "the best absinthe" on the market; he must have read that on their bottle or something.

Color: fake. Not even trying to masquerade as natural. This is the color club kids think absinthe ought to be.

Louche: it took so long I started to worry it wasn't ever going to happen at all. Not particularly thrilling once it go going either, but at least there was something happening.

Aroma: n/a

Flavor: pre-sweetened which I should have remembered so that I could have saved myself a sugar cube. Cloying with it's "fake licorice" star anise flavor and precious little else. I tasted none of the wormwood they taut so annoyingly in the marketing, nor any other herbs.

Finish: it's already been said, but black licorice jelly beans are the nearest thing to come to mind. I finished the glass, but I feel no need to ever revisit it.

Overall: it sets a very bad example and is sure to turn off many casual imbibers. Honestly I would recommend Pernod over this in a heart beat if nothing better was on hand.

Reviewed by retrogarde     May 18, 2009
Overall rating 
 
2.5
Appearance 
 
2.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
2.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
2.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Ho hum.

The color is very nice, but it's fake so I'm hard pressed to give it any praise. Resorting to artificial coloring shows a lack of respect and knowledge.

The louche is quite nice, but given the amount of anise in this thing it can hardly come as a surprise. The only downside I saw the artificial coloring sticking around to mess up the opalescence of the final product.

Nothing to comment about the aroma since I can't smell.

The flavor isn't terrible, it just isn't much to write home about either. There is certainly plenty of anise, and ghost of wormwood for a moment, and then: nothing. It's gone faster than I consider respectable, especially for the price they're asking.

Oops, I went right in to the finish while describing the flavor. But the two follow each other so closely it is little surprise. It's easy to drink Pernod quickly as there's little to savor, and perhaps this was their goal. Not a lofty one to be sure.

And yet I can't hate this drink. If it didn't pretend to carry on the Pernod Fils legacy it would be just another unremarkable absinthe that at least was aiming towards a traditional taste. Cut out the food coloring and balance the flavors and who knows?

Reviewed by retrogarde     May 15, 2009
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
4.0

I love this meadow

colour:

A darker green than Walton Waters, but this just makes it more enticing. Truly a beautiful color

louche:

Superb louche with a little over a 3:1 cold water ratio. Plenty of interesting changes in the glass, and a nice amount of that beautiful color remains in the finished product.

aroma:

I have no sense of smell, so I can't comment on this.

flavour and finish:

What a fantastic mix of herbs! No funk, no over the top aspects. The mouthfeel is delightfully creamy, and a pleasant numbing of the tongue towards the end doesn't detract. I've always sugared my absinthes, but this is one I intend to try with just water. Not that it is sweet, just that the herbs seem to be creating a distinct experience that my sugar may be masking. Perhaps it is knowing that this absinthe is made in small batches, but everything points towards a lovingly prepared, "hand made" flavor. It makes me think of absinthe's origins as a tonic. Meadow of Love will cure what ails you.

overall:

This is an excellent entry in the market, and another feather in the cap of American-made absinthes. Great flavor and a real surprise are in store for anyone who buys a bottle.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by retrogarde     July 18, 2008
Overall rating 
 
3.3
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Bravo Chicago!

This was a surprising absinthe on a number of levels. I am thrilled that such a quality traditional absinthe is being made and distributed in the U.S. Now on to the details:



Color: reminds me of good olive oil, natural but dark green with a brown tinge, Yes, it could be lighter, but I don't find it unattractive in the least.



Louche: Very thick, pleasantly protracted and fascinating to watch. My only complaint is with the final color, the brown tinge dominates the louche in a rather sickly way that actually gave me pause before my first sip. But the dramatic nature of the louche kept me from rating it less than "4".



Aroma: not my category, Ive borrowed the "3" from the other reviews.



Flavor: very interesting. I second Peridot's "Big Red gum" description. It is a tad grassy and light on the anise, but with an orange peel sort of citrus note. The mouthfeel is nicely creamy as well, especially while your water ratio is low. Of the three glasses I had (on three different nights), each had a different dominant flavor which gave the drink a strange split personality quality. Whether this variation was do to the drink or the drinker I'm not sure, but the flavors I have listed above remained present in all three glasses.



Finish: the Big Red gum lingers or a few minutes, but not unpleasantly. I just found that I needed to let it pass before I could have more. But this gives each sip the breathing room that a good drink deserves.



Overall: I would gladly buy a bottle for the collection, even if it might not be my first choice to drink. It is a distinctive yet nicely traditional addition to the American market. Bravo!

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by retrogarde     July 02, 2008
Last updated: July 02, 2008
Overall rating 
 
3.9
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Absinthe for hot summer nights

This review is based on a sample from the same Spanish bottle as Dr. Love's review.



Color: natural and elegant, but perhaps a bit subdued. Clear of sediment though, and pleasing to the eye.



Louche: almost as soon as I started dripping chilled water into my glass the louche began to build. Starting in the depths of the glass and reaching up quickly, the louche clouded up beautifully but quickly. Those who enjoy a prolonged louche will be disappointed.



Aroma: I am anosmic, so I can not comment on this facet, but since I have to give it some rating I have borrowed Dr. Love's choice of a 4.



Flavor: Very creamy indeed and, as noted bt Dr. Love, there is certainly a vanilla flavor up front. This is replaced by a spicy anise flavor that outlasts any other subtle mint or wormwood flavors. Mint was in no way overpowering in my sample and I might have overlooked it if I hadn't been looking specifically for it.



Finish: perhaps too quick, but clean and refreshing in a way that seemed well planned to me. This is why I titled this review as I did; the finish is perfect for a humid nights. There is pleasant numbing of the tongue, but also that lingering spiciness.



Overall: as my first Absenta that was not an oil mix, I found Obsello to be an interesting variation on Absinthe and a tasty treat. If I could change one aspect it would be to increase the wormwood to balance the flavor slightly, but this is a minor quibble. I recommend it and hope it is available in the U.S. very soon.

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