Reviews written by dannyhawaii

7 results - showing 1 - 7
 
 
Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by dannyhawaii     October 07, 2008
Last updated: October 07, 2008
Overall rating 
 
3.9
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

The Big Daddy Of Lucid

In the glass, this is a pale and perfectly clear olive. After a solid yet unspectacular performance in the louche, the final colour is a tad thin, but still has hints of opal at the meniscus.

The strange thing about this absinthe, in terms of the aroma and the flavour, is just how similar it is to Lucid. It's definitely more complex, warmer and rounded, but if you think of a flavour profile as a graph along the taste buds, the shape of the curve is really quite similar to Lucid.

It has a nice dry finish, seeming to concentrate more on the anise on the way down and then lingering with the wormwood once it's over. Due to its relation to the original Eduoard, I had some idea that this would be a more 'manly' absinthe like the Raymond Thi 1914, or at least that's what I've been told. I see it as more conventional than that, with a more rounded flavour. Still, the flavour is the exact reason I keep coming back to this marque, as I watch the other Jades stay level in the bottle.

One other puzzle that I'm still trying to figure out is that the earlier Jades seem to have a different grape (or marc) base, one that somewhat overpowers the herbs. This bottling is from 2008, and along with a Nouvelle Orleans, does not exhibit that same spirit base, at least to my grape sensitive taste buds.

To complicate matters, I have to say that at this moment, the Edouard is my favourite of the Jade absinthes. While the PF1901 has a magical and creamy floral quality, this one is easier to drink for me, which possibly has something to do with a change in the base. But I'm just speculating.

I dub thee Big Daddy Of Lucid. Translation: if you like Lucid and have a desire to try something better but similar, do not hesitate to fork out the cashola for this, my favourite drinking absinthe from Jade Liqueurs.

Vintage Absinthe
Reviewed by dannyhawaii     July 11, 2008
Last updated: October 07, 2008
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

The Man's Pre-Ban

A clear autumnal brown on pouring, this artisanal offering didn't have the same vibrant amber of the Pernod Fils 1910, the only other vintage absinthe I can compare this to. But still, it was a thing to behold.

Sniffing before the louche brought forth a strong brandy-like aroma which soon gave way to cigars and leather, books and wood. The alcohol somewhat masked the herbs and the anise appeared especially subdued; this seemed to be the general theme of the Raymond Thi, at least for this semi-experienced absintheur.

The louche had the same slow transition as Pernod Fils 1910 but the final product was a thicker, milky honey with strong opalescence at the meniscus. The dark layer disappeared at about 3.5:1 and so did the aroma of the alcohol, bringing forth something much more balanced yet still spicy.

As I will most probably do with all pre-ban absinthes, I tried two glasses: one with sugar, one without.

Sugar didn't seem to marry as well with this absinthe as the 1910; it's almost as if they were at odds with each other. And this is where my affectation of this drink as a "man's pre-ban" came to mind. First, the strong, brandy-like aroma, then the fight against the sugar; finally, the second glass had a powerful wormwood presence and peppery flavour.

Again, an image of pitted leather lounges and mahogany bookshelves. I could see a handful of men armed with brandy snifters retiring to this den.

While the Pernod Fils 1910 taught me the value of an integrated, complex balance, the Raymond Thi 1914 had a sharper tone with a dry, strong, and minty wormwood forefront. This drink finally programmed my taste buds to recognise that dry bitter note of wormwood. And it was this wormwood-laden flavour that stuck to my tongue, allowing me to savour the finish for the next hour or so.

As Shabba has said below, the Raymond Thi somehow encourages you to drink it quickly and I found myself downing the two glasses in less than my usual twenty minutes per dose.

This was a version of absinthe heaven to me, to experience that lucid drunkenness from almost a hundred years past. Please forgive my labelling of this as a man's pre-ban and the imagery I've used, but there was a certain masculinity to this absinthe that I found myself revelling in.

Many thanks to MThuilli for this once-in-a-lifetime chance to taste a homegrown before homegrown was ever a concept.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by dannyhawaii     July 07, 2008
Last updated: October 07, 2008
Overall rating 
 
3.7
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Revisiting old ground

Coming in a nicely sized 700ml bottle labelled with a tasteful watercolour by Marilyn Manson, the aroma of the neat liquid is predominantly anise and alcohol. The colour is pale, thin and slightly bright in an unnatural way. I prefer the deeper emerald of Duplais Verte, but this colour obviously attracts the eye of the newcomer.

The louche doesn't quite have the same gentle transition of the other bottlings from Matter-Luginbühl, but a slow drip shows enough swirling of the fairy in the early stages, bringing out a pleasing anise aroma and a decent milky green end product.

This was the first verte absinthe I tried and it's been about six months since then. I've had plenty of other brands and bottlings including pre-ban absinthe in this time, but there's still something magical about Mansinthe's combination of wormwood and anise. The supporting herbs don't seem to have much presence, making the flavour a tad on the simple side, but this simplicity is extremely appealing.

Minty wormwood lingers on the tongue with the anise, with only a slight numbing. Watered at a ratio of around 3:1 to 4:1, Mansinthe presents a creamy and very pleasant experience. At the price, it's a great everyday verte and if you can get past the somewhat gimmicky association with Marilyn Manson, this is a quality drop.

Retired Brands
Reviewed by dannyhawaii     July 02, 2008
Last updated: October 07, 2008
Overall rating 
 
4.4
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Magical Marteau

From the moment you pour this slightly pale mix of olive and peridot green into the glass, you can smell what I believe is the same grape base that Duplais Blanche uses. And this makes perfect sense, as the drink comes from the same distillery.

As you watch the drops of water land and splash, a lovely swirl of oil trails leads you through the transition of the absinthe into a milky green white with hints of refractive opal. This is a louche worth watching and waiting for.

Once the drink is ready, take some time to breathe in its aromas, as you will find a balance that fills the gaps missing in other bottlings from the same distillery such as Duplais Verte and Mansinthe. This tells you everything about the taste to come, which is a fine balance between the holy trinity of herbs, smoothed out by a slight vegetal note, which lingers on the tongue.

Maybe the colour could be deeper and the mouth feel a tad creamier, but then you might lose the qualities that also make this my new go-to absinthe for Sazeracs. Get a bottle of Marteau and fill a small atomiser with it for the perfect Sazerac, but once you've done that, take your time enjoying what I consider the finest absinthe to come out of the Matter-Luginbühl distillery to date.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by dannyhawaii     June 27, 2008
Last updated: October 07, 2008
Overall rating 
 
3.4
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Third formulation, strange and challenging.

Pale olive before louche, this out-of-left-field absinthe tastes quite good neat. I could see it making for some interesting cocktails.

The louche is over quickly, without much in the way of trails, and the result is translucent and muted, almost as if the herbs have been taken from the morgue.

It smells more like a vegetable garden than a floral one, with the alcohol much more present before the louche. Afterwards, the aroma is more toned down and balanced. I don't smell much in the way of anise or wormwood, but I am getting plenty of vegetables with cinnamon.

This carries on to the flavour which makes the drink taste not very much like absinthe to this set of taste buds. There are subtle notes of anise and wormwood, but this is covered by the citrus, cinnamon and something very much like vegetable pulp (parsley mixed with celery?). The finish lingers well enough, but the citrus hangs around like an unwelcome guest, refusing to leave.

I'm a fan of cinnamon and that's what drew me to this drink, but I'm not very partial to citrus when it comes to absinthe. In fact, Montmartre reminds me of the horrible Doubs Premium from South Africa, even though it is much better crafted. I'd say Montmartre's second edition is not for everyone, but if you like citrus and cinnamon, as well as challenging your taste buds with something different, it's definitely worth a try.

Still, I have a feeling it's going to take me a long time to work through this bottle. Hopefully some cocktails will help that along nicely.

EDIT: I was under the impression that this was the second formulation but have since found that it is the Troisième edition.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by dannyhawaii     June 26, 2008
Last updated: October 07, 2008
Overall rating 
 
2.7
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
2.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
2.0
Overall 
 
3.0

One step up from Pernod and I'm not talking Fils

A crystal clear, bright green liquid in a clear bottle emblazoned with a huge eye that stares out at you and dares you to lick it. While the colour before louche is clear, it is a heightened and artificial green which makes for fun photographs but doesn't inspire confidence

Neither does the aroma which smells hugely of alcohol with a generous dollop of jelly bean liquorice. After louching, there's not much difference, except for the alcohol being somewhat dimmed

Louching is the best part of this drink. There are some lovely oil trails but it is over all too soon. The final colour is attractive but enough of that eye popping green remains to detract from it. I would have given this 3.5 if the system allowed for it

It's obvious this is an oil mix** as soon as it hits your tongue and the flavour reminds me far more of a less sickly version of Pernod (the pastis), with a possible hint of wormwood bitterness that is immediately washed over by alcohol and jelly beans. The oiliness of the drink lingers like a painful memory.

Given a choice between this and Green Fairy toilet rinse for a night out on the town, I'd easily choose this. It's like the big brother of pastis and has some pleasant and gentle secondaries (but remember kids, drink for the taste!). The problem is that it costs about twice as much as a pastis and isn't anywhere near twice as good.

**Editor's note: according to the brand owner, La Fee Parisienne is 100% distilled, with no added essences or oils.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by dannyhawaii     June 23, 2008
Last updated: October 07, 2008
Overall rating 
 
4.1
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Sweet and dry

Clear as water, this blanche made from a grape base shows it from the first sniff of the open bottle. Like all the absinthes from Matter-Luginbühl, it's best to open and re-cork it for a week before fully enjoying its flavours.

The louche is the best I've seen in a blanche so far, with swirling milky trails that dance around the glass as the drink turns to a translucent alabaster. The transition is smooth but not entirely seamless and I'm only docking the louche rating because the final drink is missing that fabled pearlescent tone.

Caressing the tongue lightly, anise, fennel and wormwood are very well balanced and the mouth feel is just creamy enough to remain refreshing. When taken with sugar it has a lovely caramel note but is best with a 4:1 ratio of water. The taste doesn't linger for very long and is a tad on the dry side, but this makes the high alcohol percentage almost unnoticeable.

More complex than Kübler but just as refreshing, not as warm and rounded as La Ptite Douce but not far behind, Duplais Blanche is a perfect match for those who like their blanches sweet and dry.

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