Reviews written by absinthist

60 results - showing 1 - 25
1 2 3  
 
Faux Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     July 21, 2011
Overall rating 
 
2.3
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
2.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
2.0
Overall 
 
2.0

Really? No.

The colour is very profound, green and what not. Taking into account a big stalk of hyssop in the bottle, it is no wonder the colouration is an on-going process.

Louche is very delicate, it does louche, but gets only slight opalescence.

Aroma is strong, sometimes too strong due to the overcolouration. Pleasant in a sense if nothing fascinating.

Absinthe tastes of macerated wormwood and macerated herbs (hyssop the most dominant there) from the bottle. Taste reflects the strength of the aroma.

Definitely, absinthe should not be coloured at such a low abv as 60% and leaving some of the colouring herbs in the bottle is a no-no, absinthe is not a borovicka (where in many a case, we can see a big juniper right in the bottle, but doing little to no harm, though).

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     July 21, 2011
Overall rating 
 
2.0
Appearance 
 
1.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
2.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
2.0
Overall 
 
2.0

Once a great maker, now a failure

One of the most undercoloured absinthes I have ever seen. A total letdown.

On the other hand, the louche is spectacular and pleasant to look at. Because of skrewed colouration, the colour of a louched absinthe is very grim, unpleasant, whitened Payne's grey.

Aroma is resinous if that is the right word, whereas the flavour builds upon bitterness and lightness the same time, taste is, in fact, a great mystery whether to be that wrong or just that not bad, to put it simply.

Bitterness is too long lingering on the palate, whilst the rest of the herbs seem to be limited somehow.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     July 21, 2011
Overall rating 
 
2.3
Appearance 
 
1.0
Louche 
 
2.0
Aroma 
 
2.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

well, libertarian maybe?

Absinthe is terribly undercoloured with just a small point of green tinge.

The louche is too rapid and one-dimensional, badiane presence is evident.

Scent is relatively pleasant, if not exceptional, a good measure of coriander, followed by fennel and helluva of badiane.

Upon tasting, pontica note comes over and saves the disaster started by colour and aroma. As a result the taste is spicy and bitter, giving more body to overanetholated texture.

Compared to Libertine Amer, it is much, much better, but still not anything one would be grabbing all the time.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     July 21, 2011
Overall rating 
 
3.6
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
4.0

younger sister of Angelique

Being an ardent Angelique fan, I haven't been convinced by the appearance of Opaline.

It is a solid, more feminine absinthe, created maybe as the more angelic than diabolical (the dreadful wormwood) version of Angelique.

Its louche builds up very nicely and present us with greenish opalescence, if the colour is a tad lighter than that of Angelique.

As I mentioned, absinthe is feminine, very floral, pleasant, does not have the herbaceousness of Angelique, nor does it have the robust foundation of CAB's les bleues. Wormwood is discrete there, but present enough as long as feminine aspect allows it to bloom.

Upon tasting, the best ratio seems to be 1:3.5, absinthe reveals us with a delicate breeze over Jura mountains with some herbal, yet very delicate, accents. So is the finish which is not as bold as one would await from verte, but close enough to a finish of such a feminine verte, Opaline proudly wins to be.

An alternative to Angelique, that is for sure, if no match for Butterfly or Sapphire.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     July 19, 2011
Overall rating 
 
4.6
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

Finally Mysterysinthe is back!

Absinthe pours a velvety light golden cognac with very tiny greenish reflections. The closest would be Clandestine verte Suisse. Perfect.

Swirling, subtle louche. At 1:1, there is still an unlouched layer. And creamy and opaque in the vein of the majority of pre-bans.

Smells woody and camphorous, quite similar to Edouard from 1910. Alcohol is perceptible in the nose, though. The scent is very homogenous, but still a tad young.

It is Bitter and very camphorous. Too camphorus at the edges, not heavy from anethole

Taste is expressed by camphor, slight melissa, the finish is penetrating, the spiciness very, very subtle. It does not taste 100% pre-ban, but tastes like a well rested absinthe, definitely older than most what's on the market right now.

A great product for the connoisseurs, if the camphorous note may get too prominent causing inbalance.




Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     July 19, 2011
Last updated: July 19, 2011
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Mediterranean breeze with a kick

Colour is Light golden. Could be darker. The tinge is in the vein of L'italienne but not spoiling the coeur of distillation.

Louche is translucent, almost to the dot, neither too thin nor too thick. The best ratio is 1:2. All the aromas and single nuances are being captured, the amount of water is just enough to open the absinthe in full majesty.

Upon taking a whiff, you are getting Violets, perfums, very light, almost ethereal, smells like alpine bitters from Italy. Aroma is very frontal without any edges, the fuller notes of wormwood, earthiness are approaching slowly all the way thru instead of emerging just in the finish.

Astringent, very very subtle. Not cloying. Bitter in the vein of gentiane or cinchoma. No heaviness from anethole buddies. These are just accompanying the main herbal sensations.

There is an irrestible note that is very strong on the palate and is not hidden in the finish. It starts like calamus, but going in th rooty sensation of gentian or cinchoma. It is like absinthe style with decent and robust Italian vermouth foundation.

Completely different story than L'Italienne although rooted in the same Tradition. Much, much bolder.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     July 19, 2011
Overall rating 
 
2.5
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
2.0
Overall 
 
2.0

Edward is not Edouard

Absinthe is clear and presents a nice turbulent louche with oil trails and more, what is pleasant to observe. Once louched it shows a gentle opacity with little blueish notes at the edges.

Aroma is built on a very strong pronounced rosemary, chamomile a like note, not particularly of absinthe realm, but intriguing enough to take the first sip.

Upon tasting it is emulsion, or emulsifier akin, a strange bite outta nowhere, despite 1:2 dilution. Mouthfeel is thin and very minty, but not from wormwood. Taste is spicy, there is a strong cloying from anethole in the back, there are very few herbs, as if used very sparingly. 1:1.5 absinthe is still harsh from alcohol, a little more water it fades, but looks like the quest for wormwood is gonna end as with Obsello.

A blanche that needs major enrichments and hard work. Not that bad, but not good, either, going in the direction of raki or ouzo.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     December 23, 2010
Last updated: December 24, 2010
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

my favourite verte from Switzerland

I have reviewed two versions of veuve verte, the one that was 69%-1 and the other that was 68%-2. There was a premiere version, 54% which I have not had and the following review compilation is NOT about the latter.

Veuve verte 69%, reviewed 1/28/2010

Exemplary vivid green is the colour of this potion. The louche is slow and gradual unlike in other Swiss absinthes that suffer from badiane mocha louche. The louche absinthe retains green tinge and does not get too whitish.

The aroma is dominated with pontica and melissa, the herbs play the main roles, not the grains. Alcohol is undetectable, even at 69% it should be praised. Thick but not heavy, bitter and spicy on the palate the absinthe opens enough at 1:4

It might be me, but I detect tansy therein (it was later confirmed by the producer). There is licorice, pontica, wormwood very nicely pronounced, some anise, everything is balanced and not as bitter as some claim. Yet, well-balanced.

I really liked and so did my parents (not only for the tansy inclusion :)

Veuve verte 68%, reviewed 12/21/2010

The colour has changed a bit, but still is a pleasure to look at: green deep enough transforming into feuille morte. Louche has not changed a iota.

The aroma has evolved, it is tansy upfront and a little touch from mint, very balanced and rich.

At the first glance, absinthe is spicy and bitter, slightly heavy, pleasant. Balanced. Taste is the equilibrium of reasonable bitterness marrying with some spiciness and just a touch of sweetness. Masculine, absinthe forte. It is better than the previous Veuve Verte-it is more bold.

Knowing from the producer it is incorporating some ideas from C.F. Berger's art, it is a superb verte that has everything in accordance with tradition.







Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     December 23, 2010
Last updated: December 24, 2010
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

She has sapphire eyes, that fairy I mean

Colour, louche and general characteristics are typical of la bleue style and there is nothing in these departments that would make Sapphire be an odd man out.

Yet, with the aroma, the milk gets spilled. First of all, aroma is sweet, strongly sweet with melissa and fennel being the avantgarde. Secondly, from the aroma alone, this la bleue is much less, less sweet than other les bleues. Kinda contradictory, but very evident.

The taste is fennel, anise, wormwood, very simple, some others follow later, but what makes it different from some other les bleues, wormwood is really strong in the finish, it is not a touch of wormwood, but a slap in the face with wormwood stalk! Pontica comes over nicely, but there is no lingering bitterness as usual, gets sweetish towards the end.

As la bleue it is very special absinthe and can be a surprise to some. Since it is out of stock now due to some hurdles, an opportunity of tasting it becomes a rare treat.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     December 23, 2010
Last updated: December 24, 2010
Overall rating 
 
3.5
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

It is cheap but tasty

It looks like a blanche, but is not that clear. That batch is quite good, the previous batches were yellow-tinged AFAIK.

Louche is turbulent and ends opaque.

Since absinthe is rather simple, the aroma is a surprise: The scent of aniseed, a sugary aniseed, but not star anise, no herbal aroma, pleasant.

Anisy with bitter undertone. Very simple, simpler than in Segarra which contains wormwood and anise only. Mouthfeel is not heavy, it is too short. Anise, anise, maybe fennel, some star anise and wormwood in the finish. Wormwood is pronounced too strongly and anise profile is too sugary. Libation is pleasant, 1:3, yet the herb-bill requires much work.

It is absinthe ordinaire albeit without antimony chloride or methanol:) Good sipper, needs cuts on anise. Pleasant and that is all. Could be elaborated more.

Interestingly, some people found in the previous batches the astringent bitterness which is not present in this one.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     December 22, 2010
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

The almost legendary verte de Fou

Ideally green feuille morte on the rise.

The louche is too quick, at 1:2 is totally opaque. The finished colour is green and creamy.

The aroma, albeit deprived of wormwood note, reveals a pleasant nose of mint, veronica and anise.

Upon tasting, 1:3 is the best, absinthe is spicy and anisy, slightly heavy but not as much as a blanche. Wormwood well-pronounced, base is not obtrusive, fennel in the back, veronica prominent but not silencing the others.

It is almost an exemplary French verte, but I have no idea what has happened to the absinthe as of now and since they started filtering it.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     December 22, 2010
Overall rating 
 
3.8
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

French style blanche

The review was conducted 2/9/2010 from a well-stored bottle.

The results of that tasting are really impressive since when fresh from the bottle without aeration the blanche was so-so.

Colour is clear and produces a bubble

Louche is not in the vein of les bleues, but is a typical, tonned-down French blanche louche

Aroma is composed of orchestra of wormwood, a little genepi, chamomile and some earthy notes from angelica.

Being so invited it is a great disappointment with the flavour: Overbalanced. Coriander in the very end with veronica. Middle palate is built of chamomile and wormwood, genepi comes over at 1:4, but it is the the maximum dilution, 1:3 is perfect. The alcohol seems to be of top notch quality unless it is 74%

A blanche indeed but needs some cuts in the anise department, the mouth-feel is sticky and heavy. I believe that problem has been omitted finally in Double, which it is to some extent quite similar.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     December 22, 2010
Overall rating 
 
1.8
Appearance 
 
1.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
1.0
Finish 
 
1.0
Overall 
 
1.0

Oliva, not a good name for a product, either

Too pale slight yellow tinge is the colour of that product.

Louche is what makes us hope for some improvement, it is nice, thick and turbulent.

The aroma is composed of mint and wormwood only, it smells sweetish, but there is nothing spectacular about it.

Taste is really not good. It is grassy, bitter, watery and flat and in the finish the bitterness is lingering long on the palate.

If it is a distilled product, heart is cut too late and helluva of absinthins extracted therewith.

The Czech Republic has only one absinthe to be offered and it is St. Antoine and it will take other light years to get to that standard. Money cannot buy an instantaneous success.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     December 22, 2010
Overall rating 
 
3.5
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Willy strikes back

Absinthe appears as a crystal lake liquid that transforms slowly into a milk upon the addition of water.

The aroma is herbal, not herbaceous with present anisy undertones. Sadly, the taste is harsh and even acrid, despite the good measure of wormwood and nicely balanced bouquet.

The regular Bovet is better and smoother. Willy has gone a step further and released two more absinthes, so definitely he is developing, but is it in the right direction?

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     December 21, 2010
Overall rating 
 
3.8
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

La bleue the classical way, or...

Colour is clear, no flaws no sediments.

Louche is a bit too quick, yet nice to look at.

Aroma is very puzzling depending whether it is analyzed neat, with the regular dilution (1:3) or the factually required dilution (1:1.5):

Wormwood is upfront, a little fennel comes then. Smells sweetish, but is balanced and pleasant.

The absinthe blooms with strong wormwood, piquant fennel, discrete anise and quite pleasant, not grassy pontica in the finish. However, if you cross the limit of 1:1.5 ratio, these nuances fade away.

Overall, A la bleue the way it is gotta be. For my personal taste yet, Lait du Jura #2 is better.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     December 20, 2010
Last updated: December 20, 2010
Overall rating 
 
4.6
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

St. Antoine #7

Despite being given the opportunity of tasting all the previous St. Antoine versions, the latest one, i.e. #7 seems to capture all the glorious moments in its history. St. Antoine stands fast on its position of the most accurate absinthe hailing from Czech Republic. End of story.

Colour is not as vivid as in previous batches, slightly on the pale green side

Louche is ideal, that is all I can say

Aroma is composed of veronica upfront-in the vein of the premiere batches, good measure of anise, , very herbaceous

Flavour is slightly minty, not heavy, dry and smooth the same time. Wormwood and mint, or melissa get very prominent, but veronica is far away, the finish with coriander and anise. Has chamomile been removed-is the question that comes to my mind. Martin has kindly explained that it was lowered only.

All in all, everything that was supposed to be done in the realm of St. Antoine verte, has been done. Time for a blanche. Now!

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     December 20, 2010
Overall rating 
 
3.5
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Doubtful mystifique

Colour is proper, could be darker, but as long as the New Master Distiller takes over the production, we cannot expect much.

Louche is gradual and slow and very attractive.

Aroma attacks with a persistent, harsh mint, it is not that pleasant as it should be-maybe the mint of dubious quality or even of wrong species, yet the aroma is saved with a discrete wormwood

Flavour is organized as the mixture of spiciness and crispiness, what is relatively palatable. The finish is anisy, with wormwood in the middle. The main flaw is that absinthe is unbalanced despite the rumours of its long "aging" or whatever.

There are things that catch our attention positively, yet there is no artistry or skill in it. And ad hoc.

Better than Vieux Pontarlier or Roquette, still needs some work in the obvious departments. Diminishing of the mint would be required, it gets sticky on the tongue for too long.

Reviewed by absinthist     November 10, 2010
Overall rating 
 
3.8
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Un Leopold, garcon!

Colour: Natural green with a yellow edge. Pleasant to look at, so no complaints. Upon addition of water it louches. Opalescence in its pure form. Neither too opaque nor too thin. Unlike the most of commercial brands, it has a beautiful green tinge, no chalkiness, no whitiness

Louche: Delicate, yet slightly hasty. At 1:1 leaves a nice unlouched layer on top, then gets muddy but in a positive sense.

aroma: Herbaceous with veronica and pontica notes, anise in the back. Something citrusy is apparent what I attribute to pisco. Still, inviting and not too overpowering.

Flavour: Robust, as a grain advocate, I must admit pisco lends the boldness that marries well with herbacousness/spiciness and mitigates the citrusy flavour-that is very prevalent when you take Leopold neat. Cannot decide on the perfect water ratio but it seems to be 1:2-1:3.5, otherwise the herbs got lost.
Finish: Wormwood is perceptible so is pontica, fennel gets very subdued, but anise is discrete enough. A glass offers a wide array of tastes, nuances.

Overall: Right direction. So far in the US Leopold rules the vertes' realm. However, some development is desired and welcomed.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     November 05, 2010
Last updated: November 05, 2010
Overall rating 
 
4.8
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

Pernot can make a verte! Yay!

colour:
Nice green with yellowish tinge. Reveals a decent and proper colouration what was not always the case as regards Emile Pernot products.

louche:

Delicate louche, at 1:1 leaving an unlouched layer. Green and opalescent. Not too whitish. Opaque enough

aroma:

Fragrant melissa and Pontarlier, non-mistaken, wormwood. Aroma is very fruity and clean. It has the scent of other absinthes from Emile Pernot, but that one is particularly pleasant and inviting. There is a really evident hyssop flowertops note in the middle. Absinthe ain't heavy

Flavour:

It begins with colouring herbs, so melissa, pontica, maybe a little mint and very potent hyssop. There is an interlude for short anise sensation and really powerful wormwood-like smelling the flowering branches-in the finish. Actually, the finish is comprised of 30% spiciness-very delicate, coriander maybe? and 70% top notch strong bitterness.

I have been disappointed with many earlier Emile Pernot offerings, from terrible undercoloured Emiles via decent Wormwood blanche to weak and smelly Roquette or Doubs. This is a milestone and if the Master Distiller does not allow some certain people messing with alembics, the true Art shall emerge from the distillery. Alas.



Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     November 05, 2010
Last updated: November 10, 2010
Overall rating 
 
4.1
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Fontaine of les Dieux, mais MAIS MAAAAAIIIIS

Colour: clear, no sediment, no flaws. I thought it would be more in the semi translucent blanche direction

louche: 1:1 opaque, badiane-influenced louche, too quick

aroma: Nicy, fruity wormwood, some melissa, angelica, a bit pungent but in a good sense

flavour: Very pleasant, slightly pine-y. The finish is very evident.

I really like the finish: wormwood, hyssop, there is a chamomile known from Helfrich, very balanced, very fruity and bold. Best at 1:2.5. 1:3 washes some of the initial aromas.

A good attempt at a blanche. I had higher expectations, but still a real deal blanche, not la bleue, despite the quickie louche.

What I can say more? The direction is really right, but still there is a helluva of work dedicated to bringing wormwood IN



Reviewed by absinthist     September 27, 2010
Overall rating 
 
4.5
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Lemercier goes blanche'y

Here we have a very decent blanche in the typical French, not Swiss tradition.

The product is clean, robust and herbaceous. The louche is slow-forming but getting the nice opacity. Aroma is very herbal, slightly medicinal. The taste is very complex, layering with noticeable wormwood, pontica, some hyssop. At 68% it is a pleasant addition to a few remaining French blanches and in case of Lemercier, it is a step further than Abisinthes.

Worth trying and worth drinking, not to be confused with Triple or Republique

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     September 27, 2010
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

very decent la bleue

A typical la bleue, having nothing to do with a first class les bleues, but being a some sort of clandestine absinthe one would get in the years 1940-1970.

The herb-bill is not very complex, yet what strikes the most is the good measure of wormwood upfront and not irritating anethole, despite the use of badiane what contributes to the quite a quick louche.

Taste is herbaceous, so is finish. Drier than in others and not that heavy.

Amongst other les bleues I would put it together with Jean Jacquet. Definitely not an anisette.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     September 27, 2010
Overall rating 
 
2.6
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
2.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
2.0
Overall 
 
2.0

rather ordinaire than fine


La Fine series by Racine is a kind of mystery to me.

I have had them for the very first at Boveresse and to tell the truth could not finish the glass of a verte especially. Later on it has been revealed it was a verte coloured with wormwood and at 68%.

While verte is very bold, even too bold (however, the newer batches seem to be more palatable), the blanche is anisette. It is the perfect representation of what has happened to les bleues (not all of them, obviously) in Switzerland.

The aroma is simple: badiane, badiane, badiane, fennel, a pinch of wormwood. Thank you

The louche is alright but knowing that blanche is 68%, it should bloom with herbs.

Taste is flat, one-dimensional with predominant anise notes. And here ends the short story about that anisette.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     September 27, 2010
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
5.0

I am gonna fly away

I have been following the development of Butterfly since the time its creator called it simply AA-American absinthe.

In comparison with the early prototypes and the unofficial run, the fully-fledged Butterfly is a remarkable journey to the times of America, Europe when the clock of the ban was still silent.

Absinthe yields a perfect olive green, dark tourmaline colour, I hearsay in some people’s bottles it went feuille morte what speaks more in favour of the right colouration.

The louche is a tad thicker than I have desired from the prototypes (they had a lighter louche), nevertheless here we can see the winning hand of Claude-Alain.

Aroma reveals the complexity of a verte, the most dominant notes are that of crisp zests of citrus, mellow licorice, a slight touch of peppermint and other unusual flavours.

They trap the sipper just in the middle of tasting. Flavour of that absinthe is not traditional and it has never intended to be. It was made having in mind the American palate preferring sweeter, candier and robust spicy notes. And that intention has been realised to the fullest.

Due to the prominence of American, Bostonian character of the spirit, the wormwoodiness is slightly less accentuated in the finish.

Nevertheless, it is a truly American absinthe made with skills and artistry, if coming from Switzerland.

Haven’t had the other of the newer European offerings, but I am still sure they won’t dethronize Butterfly.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     April 18, 2010
Last updated: December 20, 2010
Overall rating 
 
1.5
Appearance 
 
2.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
1.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
1.0
Finish 
 
1.0
Overall 
 
1.0

Time has come to show off what you cook

Colour is just right, though artificial.

Louche is too quick and too thick.

aroma is chemical amd absinthe wrong. flavourless with hints of mint and badiane. The worst absentas are better that that.

Calling it absinthe is like calling Grey goose genuine vodka, a shame.



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