Reviews written by GreenFire

3 results - showing 1 - 3
 
 
Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by GreenFire     April 20, 2008
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
5.0

Quirky and delicious

The color is a very attractive feuille-mort. Very clear, bright and natural.



The louche is very fast and the action is not very exciting. A wall of clouds rises up from the bottom, and is complete by about 2 to 1. The louched color, though, is very nice with greener hues than the original color seemed to promise. Looks very rich and creamy to me.



The aroma really knocked me out. There is an amazing bass note of honey, new-mown grass, and clover up front. Later you smell the anise, basil, tarragon, lemon balm. It makes me hungry. I want to eat a giant plate of lasagna and drink the whole bottle. God, I dream about this aroma and wake up wanting more, no kidding.



The flavor is not exactly what the aroma promises. The anise comes on fast with a minty heat and is immediately overtaken by the wormwood. So much for first impressions. If you wait a moment longer the other flavors of basil and tarragon start asserting themselves. The bitterness lingers but is not out of balance. If you believe in the holy trinity of anise, fennel and wormwood, you may find this completely over the top. But I am digging the complexity.



The finish is more abrupt than the aroma. The wormwood bitterness lingers along with a somewhat hot antiseptic taate from the basil, and the alcohol seems a little more predominant at this point than is really desirable.



Overall, this is a *very* interesting departure from the path blazed by the new absinthe distillers. It is astonishingly good with food. Pour an ounce in your spaghetti sauce and you will weep tears of joy. I bought a second bottle right away just to make sure I don't run out. It is definitely quirky, and you may not like it. Or like me, you may find that the aroma penetrates your dreams and drags you back again and again. As others have said, maybe this is a uniquely California take on absinthe, as the Taboo is uniquely Canadian.

Faux Absinthe
Reviewed by GreenFire     April 20, 2008
Overall rating 
 
1.3
Appearance 
 
1.0
Louche 
 
2.0
Aroma 
 
2.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
1.0
Finish 
 
1.0
Overall 
 
1.0

The bottle is the only good thing here

The color is an aqua unlike anything found in nature. It looks like Ty-D-Bol.

The louche is almost non-existent. I worked very hard to coax even a faint louche out between 2 and 3 to one.

The aroma is dominated by mint and a sharp herbal scent like summer savory. A citrus note increases the overall sharpness.

At the start here is some sweetness from anise, but a ver strong minty/sage taste overwhelms everything immediatley therafter. Following that is a strongly herbal flavor (sage? summer savory?, thyme?) which really seems out of synch with the rest. A little bit of wormwood creeps through at the end.

The finish is a bit of mint, mothballs, and a lingering bitterness. Ultimately, this is an unbalanced, fragmented and unpleasant drink. Sugar actually makes it worse, as it makes the sage flavor and bitterness linger.

This is one that I really did not like at all. However, the bottle is really great. Buy it for the bottle. Put something else in it.

Absinthe Substitutes
Reviewed by GreenFire     April 20, 2008
Overall rating 
 
3.2
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

One-dimensional but pleasant substitute

Color is artificial, as the label (honestly) attests. However, it's attractive and looks a lot like the real thing - a very nice, clear, peridot green.

As a friend said: "It's really pretty and it *looks* like a drink I'd really like, except I don't like licorice." Ah, there's the rub. Good thing that I *do* like

licorice.



Louche is not remarkable, but is acceptably dense. Louches early and action is not exciting. Color when louched is very pretty, almost authentic, but slightly on the day-glo side of green. It's chemistry, plain and simple, but chemistry by people who clearly care about the craft.



Aroma is pleasant but weak and one-dimensionally anise.



Pleasant but again, one-dimensional. Some welcome bitterness from the Southern Wormwood balances the flavor a bit.



Finish is short, shows some bitterness, but nothing that really lingers and makes you want to hit it again.



Overall, this a nice anisette liqueur that has no catastrophic flaws. I mean that sincerely; it is a well-made anisette absinthe substitute. It is a nice introduction to the anisette spectrum, and is up a notch in complexity from raki, arak, and other plain anisette beverages. In complexity, it is nowhere near real absinthe, but if you can't find the real thing, this will be (at least) a drinkable reminder.

3 results - showing 1 - 3
 
 
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