Reviews written by Absomphe

26 results - showing 1 - 25
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Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Absomphe     May 29, 2012
Last updated: June 02, 2013
Overall rating 
 
4.5
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
4.5
Overall 
 
4.5

This Cat Shouldn't Have Anyone Singing The Blues

Appearance
Very nice light peridot green. A bit paler than I'd like, but absolutely clear and natural looking. The clarity is particularly impressive for an unfiltered absinthe. I've worked my way through a goodly portion of the bottle, and there is zero sign of sediment.

Louche
Although not the most gradual of louches, I don't find it to be as "quick" as a few other tasters who have commented on it. There are some nice swirling tendrils as it forms, if not exactly rolling fog banks. The final result stops short of opaque, and is reminiscent of mother of pearl that has lost most of its fire. Nonetheless, there is a smidgeon of opalescence, if one gazes at the louche in the right light.

Aroma
This is where Blues Cat really begins to shine. Fennel is the foremost ingredient, followed by a candied anise, and some woodsy qualities (I don't specifically pick out wormwood, at least neat).

Louched, Blues Cat really opens up and blossoms. Fennel is still the lead player, followed by the anise, but the woodsy earthiness is wrapped in a very fragrant alpine floral bouquet that completely fills a room. I actually walked out of another room, and had to be about twenty feet away, when I was startled by that wonderful scent.

Like its similarly earthy counterpart Ridge Verte, Blues Cat really stands up to water. I usually like my absinthe fairly dense, but I found my typical 3-4:1 dilution ratio to be a bit too concentrated to allow all the wonderful flavors to take wing, and I settled on 4-5:1 as my ideal here.

Flavor/Mouthfeel
An absolutely beautiful balance of fragrant, fruity fennel (still just a tad in the forefront), that wonderful candied anise, minty wormwood and other wildflowers, just the right touch of citrus, and something almost like chanterelle mushrooms.

Finish
The finish is incredibly lengthy without much change from the initial flavor. I agree with Michael Meyers that there is a powdery buildup that leaves one's mouth feeling a bit cluttered by the time the end of a glass is reached. However, for me, the flavor is such a beguiling combination of sweet, perfumy, and savory, that I actually enjoy the cumulative effect, hence my score of a 4.5.

Overall
Already a thing of beauty, and very balanced for its age, Blue Cat is still quite young, and there is definitely some room for the various components to further meld and soften with age. If this occurs, I feel there is an excellent chance that it will become my absolute go-to commercial offering. In any case, I fervently hope it becomes a "regular" product in the Delaware Phoenix lineup.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Absomphe     October 17, 2011
Last updated: October 17, 2011
Overall rating 
 
4.8
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

Archival Amazement

I was expecting Sauvage to be very similar to Roquette, but (although similarities exist) this wonderfully bucolic absinthe stands head and shoulders above its archival predecessor in every respect.

The color, neat, is a very vibrant emerald green tinged with yellow, beautifully clear and inviting.

The louche is extremely gradual with a subdued snow globe effect, not turbulent and rife with fog banks, but a delight to watch as it languorously unfolds. The end result is a near-perfect display of almost opaque, but slightly translucent green with bluish and amber highlights.

The nose is redolent of wormwood that has a very unusual aromatic profile. I get hints of mint tea,and nopal cactus. There is also a definite tangerine quality.

These elements are also present in the flavor (the wormwood is huge, extremely floral, and very juicy) but (as with Roquette) there is a decidedly powdery, candied, medicinal quality to this absinthe that is definitely in keeping with the primary purpose it would have served in 1804. I'm also noticing more than a hint of underlying smokiness that reminds me of Laphroaig or Laguvulin, or perhaps a bit more like that found in a modern interpretation of a 16th century Bamberg smoked beer (Hair of the Dog Adam) in the finish, along with a distinct pepperiness that melds perfectly with the citric notes.

While the wormwood definitely takes center stage here, the supporting herbs (including a very fruity fennel) play an important role, and are much more vibrant than they are in, say, that other notable wormwood showcase, Doubs Mystique.

Sauvage is a bit of a paradox in that it is, at once, rustic, and not incredibly complex, and yet also very eccentric and dynamic. All the flavors are beautifully harmonious, and (although I don't generally believe that there is any such thing as an "expert's" absinthe, I would venture to agree with the Michael Meyers assessment that Sauvage is a grownup's drink, and a wondrous one, at that

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Absomphe     July 20, 2011
Last updated: July 28, 2011
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Top Banana from Montana

At last, I got the chance to uncork this very intriguing and flavorful absinthe. What's particularly fascinating to me is that its flavor is very much as I had imagined Butterfly Absinthe would taste, before I had ever tasted it. The Butterfly let me down, once I'd tried it. The Ridge did not.

Let's begin with the appearance...the color is an ideal peridot green, although it is hazier than I feel is appropriate. There is a rustic appeal here, not dissimilar to the delightful cloudiness of a Cooper's Ale from Adelaide, Australia. However, I feel that a distilled beverage should not throw off this much of a sediment.*

* Already, after 24 hours, some of that sediment has settled, and it's had a markedly positive effect on the palate of this absinthe.

The louche is a gradual thing of beauty, slowly cascading, rolling, and forming a lovely fog bank, as it eventually clouds over, and ends up on the thick side of ideal, but with enough of an opalescence, tinged with gradients of subtly iridescent blues and pinks, to be quite nice., to me.

The mouth feel is very creamy and rich without being even the slightest bit throat clogging (like St. George Absinthe, for example).

The aroma, neat, is very tightly bound, and there is evidence of alcohol, anise (particularly real black licorice), and perhaps the slightest hint of wormwood.

Once water has been added, the aroma really blossoms into an alpine (or rather, a Montana) meadow, and the wonderful wormwood opens up to reveal a very floral, but assertive character.

I initially tried a dilution of 4:1, but (as I expected, this did not open up this dense absinthe enough, so I switched to a slightly more than 5:1 ratio, and this seemed ideal.

The flavor is very immediate, and there's an honesty to this absinthe, as FingerPickinBlue has already mentioned. Aside from the holy trinity of herbs, I can definitively pick out the vibrant elecampane that, I believe lends Ridge Verte its particularly candy-like quality. There is also a decided citric grassiness contributed by the melissa, and a distinct honeyed edge (from coriander blending with angelica, I suspect) that segues into a nice, floral Montana Wormwood, which I only wish were a bit more featured. Unfortunately, this competes with a wild grassiness that I find to be similar to the flavor of La Coquette, for example, and it just isn't quite my cup of tea.

However, there is a wonderful spiciness that sometimes overrides the grassy component, depending on how my palate is oriented on a given day, and when it does, it's reminiscent of a dominant flavor in a pet Breger clone of mine.

The finish is very complex, with all of the above elements in very nice balance, but once again, sometimes the grassiness is just a bit too prominent for my taste, and at other times, that spiciness melds beautifully with the wild grass flavor, and the finish is an ethereal symphony.

Overall, I find this to be an extremely creative, herbally intense, rich, delightfully rustic, and extremely flavor-packed absinthe that certainly holds its own against nearly any of the best absinthes available on the market today.

Major kudos to Team Ridge for this truly artisanal creation!

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Absomphe     May 02, 2011
Last updated: June 28, 2012
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
5.0

Belle Epoque Reprise

I would absolutely swear that I was drinking a top echelon pre-ban (particularly Pernod Fils 1914 "very green" to be precise) if I were blindfolded.

Gorgeous coppery/peachy feuille mort neat, which magically evolves into a creamy green with hints of brown and white after louching.

Said louche is very thick and creamy, unlike its more delicate counterparts among Stefano's other creations. The mouthfeel is, likewise, velvety and rich.

The perfuminess is there, but instead of a Mediterranean type, it is right out of the Belle Epoque, and wrapped in that classic pre-ban Rolls Royce leather.

This absinthe is absolutely seamless in its aroma and flavor, yet, at the same time, one can pick out a voluptuously fruity Florence fennel, candied anise, fragrant, baby powdery hyssop, and a particularly juicy wormwood in the remarkably lengthy finish.

There is also a peppery aspect to the mid-flavor, that reminds me of a cross between Pernod Fils "very green", and the more spicy Berger with a wonderful citric quality (more fruit-juicy than most), probably contributed by the Moldavian melissa.

Having enjoyed repeat tastings, I find myself in agreement with Brian regarding the astringent finish, but being a fan of Calvados, and, more precisely, Gale's Prize Old Ale, I find this characteristic in L'Ancienne to be bracing and inviting, rather than detrimental.*

*Having tried a few glasses of the latest (2011) version, I can say that the astringent aspect has been toned down, and the finish is far more rounded, spicy, and smooth. At this point, I feel perfectly justified in agreeing with Steve Williams, and awarding L'Ancienne a perfect score. Or rather, I would, if the star ratings could be edited.

This was an extremely limited commercial offering (only 60 of 80 bottles were up for sale), and for those who missed out, I'd recommend keeping an eye out for a hopeful reprise from Stefano, and the Zufanek distillery next year, providing the harvest is agreeable.

The Czech Republic is now the home of my absolute favorite absinthe...oh the wondrous irony!!!

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Absomphe     March 04, 2011
Last updated: March 06, 2011
Overall rating 
 
4.8
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

Liquid Poetry

First impressions: It's very much like the prototype, except with a creamier louche, which is very welcome.

It has that L'Italienne type of perfume, but with a much rounder profile including mallow, lilac, almost a jasmine quality, and a very dry woodiness that is mitigated by a substantial dose of candied anise. As it coats the palate, a subtle underpinning of citrus also reveals itself. There is very ample wormwood in the finish, and it tastes like the same Italian varietal that Stefano used in the L'Italienne distillations, which is very fragrant, but not quite as assertive as the splendid Pontarlier strain found in Berthe de Joux.

The color is a beautifully natural golden green, neat, and when louched there are lovely underpinnings of blue and copper, as well. It is true that the color could be greener, but I thought it rated a 5 because it seemed the ideal shade to match the unusually dry, floral, mallowy, and perfumy palate. A vivid green would have almost seemed somewhat out of place.

The nose (neat) is redolent of anise (more licorice-y than I expected, but after louching, a remarkably complex and nearly room filling perfuminess blossoms.

The louche (I opted for a 4:1 ratio (which seems ideal in this case)* is extremely gradual and lovely...not exactly billowing clouds and rolling fog banks, but pretty darn close, just not as turbid. There is a fine opalescence when La Grenouille is fully louched. I was very close to giving this one a 5, and still may, after I've observed a few louches.

*I wouldn't recommend a water to absinthe ratio of much lower than 4-1 because the mallow, lilac and jasmine flavors won't really reveal themselves, and the balance will shift a bit too heavily toward the citric

The flavor is not as austere as that of L'Italienne, but I could see drinkers who do not generally add sugar making an exception here, as it would probably round out the intense flavors a bit.

I am, of course, enamored of this Stefano masterpiece sans sucre, particularly the finish, which is delightfully long and fragrantly dry.

La Grenouille is a marvelous absinthe paradox, being at once a beverage of great complexity, delicacy, and finesse, and yet also powerfully flavored and direct, immediate, and vibrant. This is a feat that few modern distillers could achieve, and definitely speaks volumes for Stefano Rossoni's liquid poetic artistry.

So much for Czech absinthe (I hear Stefano supervised the distillation of this one, but it still comes out of a Czech alembic) never having a shot at the top echelon.

Reviewed by Absomphe     November 10, 2010
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Pass the Pisco, Please!

This absinthe has come a long way since batch #4, particularly regarding the color, which is now a nice shade of peridot, although it could be a bit more vibrant.

The nose is still a bit dominated by the Pisco base, and this carries through into the flavor, but I happen to really to enjoy the buttered rum ester that it imparts into the absinthe, and I find that it really works well with the herbs. Those herbs seem to be of very good quality, although the wormwood is not of the standout variety, like the Pontarlier, or the Piedemont used in L'Italienne.

The louche is very nice, thick,and gradual although there isn't the volcanic snow-globe action seen in the best of them. The mouthfeel is very creamy, and substantial, however, and the flavor, and finish are hearty, and put me in mind of rum toddies. This is my definitive winter absinthe, except perhaps for my favorite Berger clone.

Todd plans to do a little further rectification of the base once the present barrels are depleted, and I really look forward to tasting whether that allows the herbage to shine through a bit more in future batches.

Kudos to him for being so receptive to suggestions given to him on the forums, and I wish more distillers, who are relatively unfamiliar with the creation of absinthe, would follow his lead.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Absomphe     September 07, 2010
Last updated: March 28, 2011
Overall rating 
 
4.8
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

Rhapsody in Green

Color: A really vibrant lime-green shade of peridot neat.

Louched, much of the green is retained, but there are also hints of copper and blue, giving this absinthe the delightful touch of a Brutalist sculpture by Paul Evans. The louche unfolds with rolling fog banks, and just the right touch of opalescence, and is wonderfully dense, contributing to a creamy, luxurious mouthfeel.


Aroma: Neat, there is almost no hint of harsh alcohol, and a fully developed array of fruity anise and fennel, a wonderful peppery spiciness, and a definite refined blast of minty Pontarlier wormwood.

Louched, this symphonic wonder opens up and fills a room with a perfumed alpine garden that I wish was available in an aroma therapy candle.


Flavor and Finish: As impeccably balanced as the aroma, the flavor is remarkably complex with fruity anise and fennel at first, followed by a very spicy and peppery sensation that is, at the same time, perfumy (almost in the manner of L'Italienne, but more rounded), and the finish is redolent of minty, almost candied Pontarlier wormwood. There's also a very lengthy aftertaste of a touch of semi-dry mead blended with a dash of Juicy Fruit gum. It's a very lingering denouement, and one's palate is left with a sprightly, extremely pleasurable tingling sensation.

Overall: This stunning work of art has eclipsed every absinthe I've tasted, even the best pre-bans. This probably has to do with the freshness, and immediacy of the flavor. Like those pre-bans, I definitely get a textural and slight, positive flavor enhancement from a clearly well chosen wine alcohol base. I concur with Brian that this is a very masculine absinthe, but the bright perfuminess also contributes a playful side that could be just as appealing to women.

This is one of the few absinthes that I consider it no less than an honor to sip and savor.

Reviewed by Absomphe     June 11, 2009
Last updated: October 07, 2009
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Another Walton Winner!

This is a very nice, well crafted absinthe more than vaguely in the style of a Pontarlier.

The color neat is a medium forest green, and after a very full, cascading, and opaque louche, much of this green is retained, and the drink is a minty/pistachio tone.

The aroma neat is almost akin to Nyquilâ„¢ if there were a handcrafted, all natural version. After louching the aroma blossoms to reveal a fragrant, and rounded bouquet...nothing really stands out, there's just a lovely balance of herbs. It's not as room-filling as Meadow of Love's aroma, but it's quite nice.

The mouth feel is very thick, rich, and creamy, and the flavor is as rounded as the aroma, again balanced, but with just a touch of grassiness at this stage. I imagine that with some resting, this will disappear, as the color drops off a bit, and the drink becomes even smoother.

The finish is lovely, and basically continues the balance theme. It is of good duration, although it could linger a bit longer on the palate, and a touch more wormwood might help achieve this.

Overall, this is a lovely, softer, and fuller companion to Meadow of Love, and shows more of Cheryl's true distilling artistry!

Faux Absinthe
Reviewed by Absomphe     June 11, 2009
Last updated: June 11, 2009
Overall rating 
 
1.2
Appearance 
 
2.0
Louche 
 
1.0
Aroma 
 
1.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
1.0
Finish 
 
1.0
Overall 
 
1.0

At Least They Didn't Name it Spirit of Kings...

COLOR BEFORE WATER
Extremely pale peridot green, with particulate matter in solution, but certainly natural looking enough.

LOUCHE ACTION
From the addition of the very first drop of water there was the noticeable beginning of swirling action that was trying to develop into something. The problem was that it went nowhere, with the prepared drink only showing the very slightest trace of a louche, and simply becoming an even paler shade of barely discernible peridot green. I gave it two points for the initial entertainment value.

COLOR AFTER WATER
An even more extremely pale shade of peridot green, and 98% translucent, aka basically clear, with just a tincture of color, and still natural looking, hence the two points.

AROMA
Little more than some alcohol, a miniscule trace of anise, and a little obviously macerated wormwood come through in the nose, neat. When diluted, this scent dissipated, and became barely detectable.

MOUTH-FEEL
Water (not even watery) about sums it up.

TASTE
A little perceptible anise, otherwise, an interminably long, harsh, and highly unpleasant taste, (and aftertaste) of mercilessly bitter, "herb store" wormwood.

OVERALL IMPRESSION
This is one sorry excuse for an alleged absinthe, or even absinth. As I recall, even the regular King of Spirits showed a little more character (although that actually made it a little more offensive). Mostly, this is one really bland drink, but what flavor is detectable is just plain crude, and awful. The hilariously absurd price point makes it even more egregiously rotten. The bottom line... this stuff makes Logan Fils seem like PF 1901, by comparison.

Reviewed by Absomphe     June 10, 2009
Last updated: July 23, 2009
Overall rating 
 
4.8
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

Just When I thought They Couldn't Get Any Better..

This is my new favorite commercial absinthe. Everything about it is incredibly appealing to me, from the medium peridot color, to its hyssop-y, violet-y aroma, and its creamy body, and rich mouth feel.

There is a genuine upper echelon HG quality to this absinthe which is very immediate in nature, and makes the drinker feel as though he (or she) is sitting down with Cheryl in her little distillery, and being treated to a special alchemical glass from her secret stash.

The vibrancy of this absinthe is quite remarkable, and the drinker is pulled in almost opposing directions (very sweet, and yet even more dry), and the especiallly floral aftertaste is quite remarkable, and created by the wonderful wonderful violet segueing into that fragrant, juicy Virginia wormwood.

What's even more amazing is that this wonder is only a few weeks old! I truly look forward to aging a couple of bottles to see if it can possibly improve even more...only time will tell the tale.

Reviewed by Absomphe     March 12, 2009
Last updated: August 13, 2011
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

The Epitome of the Montpelier Style

Where to begin?

Although just a wee bit on the pale side, the color is a vibrant, refractive peridot green that I find immensely appealing.

The louche is a beauteous unfolding thing with lots of delicate snow globe action, which eventually clouds over to a fairly thick luminescent opalescence.

The aroma neat is like an alpine meadow with relatively soft alcohol showing through. As the louche commences, this fragrance opens up wonderfully, revealing an incredibly balanced, and rounded herbal perfume (not a literal perfume, as in L'Italienne), and one can discern beautiful Andalusian (and somewhat fruity) anise, fruity fennel, a good hint of angelica, and an absolutely amazing soft talc-like hyssop. These aromatics carry over into the flavor almost seamlessly, and while each herb can be savored on its own, one has to taste "hard" because the flavors quickly blend back into a (at the risk of repeating myself) seamless whole. The finish is long, but could have a bit more duration and intensity. The mouth feel is not the creamiest I've ever experienced, but it is perfect for the flavors that it supports, and there's an exquisite "softness"to the Pacifique that I find adds even more to its appeal.

This would be my idea of the perfect absinthe, if it were only a bit less delicate. It is like sipping, and savoring a bright, happy, alpine meadow in May, and every time I louche a glass, it awakens my senses teasingly, and leaves me quite happy, but for the slight desire that it was a tad fuller, and richer.

Thank you, Marc, for bringing this elegant and beautiful rendition of the Montpelier style to fabulous fruition!

Edit...Having recently tried the latest run of Pacifique, I must upgrade my score to a 5.0. The color has become a more vibrant peridot, the louche is definitely fuller (not quite thick, but perfect for the style), and the flavor is livelier, and richer while also being smoother, and even more seamless. If I had to choose between the superlative Edourd Pernods I have tasted, or this latest bottling of Pacifique, I would honestly choose the latter.

Reviewed by Absomphe     December 04, 2008
Last updated: March 20, 2012
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Batch 15...They're getting better and better!

This absinthe has come a long way since batch #4, particularly regarding the color, which is now a nice shade of peridot, although it could be a bit more vibrant.

The nose is still a bit dominated by the Pisco base, and this carries through into the flavor, but I happen to really to enjoy the buttered rum ester that it imparts into the absinthe, and I find that it really works well with the herbs. Those herbs seem to be of very good quality, although the wormwood is not of the standout variety, like the Pontarlier, or the Piedemont used in L'Italienne.

The louche is very nice, thick,and gradual although there isn't the volcanic snow-globe action seen in the best of them. The mouthfeel is very creamy, and substantial, however, and the flavor, and finish are hearty, and put me in mind of rum toddies. This is my definitive winter absinthe, except perhaps for my favorite Berger clone.

Todd plans to do a little further rectification of the base once the present barrels are depleted, and I really look forward to tasting whether that allows the herbage to shine through a bit more in future batches.

Kudos to him for being so receptive to suggestions given to him on the forums, and I wish more distillers, who are relatively unfamiliar with the creation of absinthe, would follow his lead.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Absomphe     December 03, 2008
Last updated: March 05, 2011
Overall rating 
 
4.5
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

Pure Floral Perfume!

Here is a case where I feel that the whole adds up to more than the sum of the parts.

Yes, the color is yellowish, but only because its creator, Steffano Rossoni, had a vision of a super-floral, and perfumy absinthe, and the mystery herb that contributed those wondrous qualities also happened to be responsible for the lack of a peridot, or emerald hue. IMO, I'd much rather sniff that glorious aroma, and taste that profound perfume, and sacrifice some of the visuals.

As far as the louche is concerned, yes, it is on the thin side, but only (once again) to allow that perfuminess to hold sway over the palate, and the addition of more anise would have destroyed much of that delicate floral balance. That being said, I found the louche to be quite adequate for the style, and nowhere near as thin as those of the Roquette, or Belle Amie.

Some drinkers have been put off by the extreme perfuminess, but I find it to be exquisite, and there is an accompanying dryness (this is one of the more austerely dry absinthes I've ever tasted) that further emphasizes the aforementioned attributes.

For my money, this is the finest commercial absinthe (along with L'Artianale) to be produced, to date.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Absomphe     December 03, 2008
Overall rating 
 
3.8
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Could Have been Better as a Whole Distillate

While there are some lovely aspects to this absinthe, such as the thick, and gradually unfolding louche, and the unusually fruity anise, there is, unfortunately, an overbearing grassy (vegetal) presence (in both the nose, and the flavor) that has caused me to sink more than one glass.

I suspect this is due to the assemblage method, since I can detect it in all of the Devoille absinthes. The color is somewhat on the darkish side, but I don't believe La Coquette was over-colored to such an extent as to cause this strong a flavor. Perhaps the veronica is also a factor, and I'm not a big fan of that particular herb.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Absomphe     November 30, 2007
Last updated: March 23, 2008
Overall rating 
 
4.8
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

Ma Belle Amie...Not Just a Song, Anymore, Folks!

This is , bar none, the finest commercial offering from the modern era...it's a true Nimes style absinthe (the wormwood is outstanding)which is huge, and intense in aroma, and flavor, as well as remarkably complex. A melange of herbs wrap around the senses, and caress the palate with top quality anise, fennel, hyssop, coriander(bigtime), melissa, fruit juicy and incredibly floral wormwood (wonderfully fragrant in the finish), and other more exotic spices, which are difficult to place, although cardamom may be one of them. The only slight drawback is a very mild vegetal characteristic which may be the result of going a tad heavy on the coloration herbs, and the louche itself could be thicker...it's reasonably opaque at a bit less than 3:1, but at almost 4:1 it's a bit light.



The nose is as intense, and complex as the flavor, although it could be just a bit more room-filling...however,it is remarkably similar to, if just a tad less luxurious than the 1914 Pernod Fils aroma, which amazed me.



The color, neat, is identical to the beautiful golden-green hue of the 1914 Pernod Fils, which is remarkable considering it is a subtle feuille mort that usually takes quite some time to appear.



The flavor, yet again, bears a striking resemblance to the 1914, except for that slight vegetal character, and the base not adding quite the depth of flavor that one used in the Pernod Fils adds. Also, I think it could be just a tad richer (after sampling a few more glasses). If I had been sent a sample of this nectar as pre-ban, I would certainly have had no problem believing it was absolutely authentic.



The finish lives up to the initial flavor, and is propelled by that remarkably powerful, incredibly floral wormwood that lingers almost infinitely. This masterpiece is the best example of a Nimes style absinthe I've ever tried, including HGs, and I'd describe it as nothing less than groundbreaking!



Hats off to Heure Verte, Emile Pernot et cie., and LDF for being the first to bring us this wondrous libation.

Vintage Absinthe
Reviewed by Absomphe     November 22, 2007
Last updated: August 18, 2009
Overall rating 
 
4.8
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

Nirvana

This was the most incredibly complex, aromatic (a real cigar absinthe, similar to Berger), and savory absinthe I have ever had the privilege to sample. That being said, there was something very blanche-like about it, from the gorgeous pale/minty-green color, to the extremely delicate, and yet incredibly assertive aroma...yes, I know that I seem to be typing oxymorons, but that is the only way I know to even attempt to describe this enigmatic wonder....totally room filling perfumed fragrance that also absolutely co-opted the senses. The flavor did likewise, and by the finish, my palate was permeated with the most floral, perfumy sensations I had EVER experienced from ANY beverage, alcoholic, or otherwise...this nectar actually eclipsed the Pernod Fils 1914 for me, and I was in a fugue state for about two hours, just groovin' on the insanely long finish!

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Absomphe     November 22, 2007
Last updated: June 15, 2009
Overall rating 
 
4.5
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

This Sho' Ain't the Old Doubs!!!

Apparently, all the buzz I'd been hearing about the totally new Doubs was right on the money! This version has about as much in common with the much-maligned oil mix original, as 1914 Pernod Fil has in common with today's Pernod 68.

The color (neat) is a lovely, and vivid peridot, and a good deal of this shade carries over into the louched drink.

The aroma is strikingly minty, and floral, and just packed with the fragrance of top-grade Pontarlier wormwood.

The star of this absinthes is undoubtedly the wormwood, which is responsible for a finish that is incredible, but there is also a nice underpinning of anise, fennel, hyssop, melissa, and even coriander that rounds out the Doubs.


The Mystique is a delightfully refreshing absinthe, and its fragrant wormwood finish is the absinthe equivalent to a hefty dry-hopping of aromatic Cascades in a beautiful IPA.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Absomphe     November 22, 2007
Last updated: November 23, 2007
Overall rating 
 
4.4
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
5.0

Second Time a Charm!

This absinthe has undergone a remarkable transformation from the original version. The remarkably complex spicy flavor is still there, but it's much more balanced, and smooth than its predecessor. There is no longer a metallic, or burnt edge, and the louche is fuller (although patience is needed, and I would a suggest somewhere around a ten minute drip to achieve a decent opalescent, but not really thick or creamy louche).



There is definitely more than a tangential resemblance between the Marteau Verte Classique, and this 1797...the unusual herb profile bears this out...the differences are the following...the Marteau is brighter, overall, but also a little sweeter on balance (befitting an ideal absinthe cocktail mixer), while the Roquette is a little drier (and more minty/bitter, reflecting its more wormwood-based origins). Bottomline, both are wonderful!

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Absomphe     November 16, 2007
Last updated: December 30, 2007
Overall rating 
 
3.5
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Cinnamon...Let Me Out!

This absinthe kinda grew on me in reverse...at one time, I was really keen on its hyper-citric, and cinnamon-laced uniqueness, but eventually, these wore out their welcome, and it became less, and less often my absinthe of choice.



The louche is fine, and I can't quibble with the color, but the aroma and flavor are just too heavily reliant on that Austrian cinnamon quality, and it's just not as absinthe-like as I'd prefer...it's a great remedy for gum infections, though!

Retired Brands
Reviewed by Absomphe     November 16, 2007
Overall rating 
 
4.1
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
4.0

A Medicine I Would Have Loved to Take in My Youth.

A very quirky "pre-commercialization" interpretatiion that both hits, and misses the mark...I love the aroma, which reminds me of an alpine meadow in springtime, and the color, which is a very deep green that carries through the louche, however, said louche is definitely on the thin side, no matter how slowly, and carefully I water the glass.



The flavor is definitely on the medicinal side, and there is a bubblegummy quality to it that reminds me of a Belgian Tripel style ale,and I mean this in a complementary way. However, the finish is just a tad on the metalic, or burnt side, so it has to lose points.



Overall, a very worthwhile effort that I found mostly appealing, and I can't wait to taste the final version.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Absomphe     November 16, 2007
Overall rating 
 
3.7
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Crawfish, anyone?

This is a really quirky absinthe, from the color, which is a very appealing deep green (neat), but tinged with blue, to the flavor, which reminds me of a spiced Christmas ale blended with a dash of Old Bay seasoning.



The louche is very good, but not great, with a nice opaque effect, but not much building action.



The finish is lengthy, but not particularly wormwoody, especially for absinthe which tested fairly high in residual thujone. (I believe it was in the 30s).



When I'm in the mood, it's a great oner, but more often than not, I'm not.

Retired Brands
Reviewed by Absomphe     November 16, 2007
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
5.0

All Commercial Absinthes Should Be This Good!

Wow...lovely color, somewhere between peridot, and emerald, but it could be more vivid.

The louche was the creamiest I've ever experienced with ANY absinthe, and was lovely, and languid, reminiscent of a Belle Epoque snow globe.

The aroma was minty, and slighty fruity from the wondrous, generous Pontarlier wormwood, great fennel, and fine anise.

The flavor was tightly bound, and yet the individual components were also quite discernible, a truly remarkable feat. My only complaint was that there was a bit too much alcoholic heat, which slightly detracted from the great finish.

Reviewed by Absomphe     November 16, 2007
Last updated: March 29, 2008
Overall rating 
 
3.7
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Lost wax casting?

I like everything about this absinthe, except for the choice of wormwood, which I suspect is responsible for this odd waxy taste in the finish.



I noticed it in the Montmartre, as well, but the extreme spiciness seemed to obscure it a bit.



Otherwise, the color, aroma, flavor, and particularly the louche were definitely above average.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Absomphe     November 16, 2007
Last updated: November 27, 2009
Overall rating 
 
4.5
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Best yet,, Ted.

There is no question, to me at least, that this is Ted's best effort, to date. Although the marc base that he uses is still a tad more evident than I'd like, there is certainly none of the funkiness that I had a hard time getting past in a few of his previous releases.

The color is a lovely, and vibrant peridot green (although not quite as impressive as I remember it in the Edouard), and enough of it carries over into the full blooming louche to create a bright and minty colored drink.

The aroma is excellent, but there is still a little too much of the base present for me to rate it any higher. High quality green anise, fennel, and hyssop are obviously present, although the wormwood seems a bit muted, and this is also true regarding the flavor. There is a fine marriage of flavors, and the finish is clean, rich, and long.

Overall, this is a top notch recreation of its antecedent, except for the somewhat toned down wormwood, particularly in the finish, and the alcohol base, which doesn't match the level of Pernod Fils...of course, to be fair, what absinthe's base today could?

Reviewed by Absomphe     November 16, 2007
Overall rating 
 
4.8
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

Penod Fils 1914 Cache

To me, this absinthe is as perfect as it gets. The only reason that I deducted a point for color was that it wasn't particularly attractive in the louched state, although it was a beautiful medium feuille mort, with a tinge of green still visible.



The louche was spectular with much volcanic swirling action, and wonderfully opalescent.



The aroma, both neat, and post louche was amazingly spicy, floral, and complex, and it was nearly impossible to pick up individual scents, expect perhaps for the outstanding quality hyssop that was redolent of baby powder.



The flavor was equally amazing, and interwoven, and was augmented by that incredible "Rolls Royce leather" component that only many decades of aging can add to an absinthe.



The finish literally lasted for hours, and the entire experience (every time I louche a glass) is a trip to Absinthe Nirvana.

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