Reviews written by Cajun Magic

3 results - showing 1 - 3
 
 
Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Cajun Magic     August 30, 2014
Overall rating 
 
3.4
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
3.5
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.5
Overall 
 
3.5

New Orleans Goes Green!

NOTE: Verte Batch One with Louisiana grown Wormwood, purchased 6/30/13 at the Atelier Vie Bottle Sale.

Appearance Pre Louche: Beautiful natural light green color with sediment at the bottom of the bottle. After Louche: Ivory colored with white milky accents.

Louche: Lovely oil trails, beautiful swirling and thick. It is on the fast side.
Aroma: anise and threshold alcohol.

Flavor/Mouthfeel: Creamy and a perfectly balanced trinity followed by a mild alcohol base warmth, followed by a savory tingling bitterness.

Finish: savory tingling and a silkiness.

Overall: While not the most complex, it is a pretty good example of an everyday absinthe. Something I can keep around for sure.

Final Notes: I'm happy to see a Verte being made in New Orleans that embraces the history of absinthe within the city and follows a traditional format. I also like the use of the Cane base, Sugarcane is close to my heart and the use of it as a base is a bold move and I applaud Atelier Vie for it. I'd love to see a deluxe version of the Verte and can't wait for the Blanche.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Cajun Magic     November 10, 2013
Overall rating 
 
2.1
Appearance 
 
2.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
2.5
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
1.0
Overall 
 
1.5

A bittersweet revisit to the past

Pre louche color: Artificial Green, emerald/ candy-like green.

Pre louche aroma: Anise and alcohol

Louche: Tons of oil trails, fast forming.

Post louche appearance: Phantom Green.

Post louche aroma: Anise threshold.

Flavor: one dimensional. It's an anise bomb. The star anise leads to the "black jellybean" licorice flavor mixed with a threshold of wormwood. mouthfeel is pretty decent.

Finish: cloying, tongue tingling and then some numbing obviously from the star anise.

Overall: while not a terrible drink, it is very iconoclastic and too unbalanced/un nuanced to be a good absinthe. It lacks depth. I am however fortunate for it being my first and that from it, I have found greener pastures.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Cajun Magic     August 03, 2013
Last updated: August 03, 2013
Overall rating 
 
3.3
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.5
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

From "The man that you fear".

Appearance: A very light green, the lightest verte I've seen as of yet.

Louche: Starts with swirling oil trails and forms beautifully, not too fast at first but then quickly developes. it seems as though it would lair well at first but then it takes over all at once.

Aroma: nice alpine coolness with a threshold of detectable alcohol presence

Flavor/mouthfeel: The mouthfeel is a tad thin. The trinity here is pretty straightforward anise and fennel play around, they are introduced to a light mintiness, then the crisp wormwood comes in. The flavor is creamy and satisfying but plays it safe. I will have to dock some points off for the thin mouthfeel.

Finish: Goes from slightly creamy with anise and wormwood, to light peppery, and ends in slightly tingly. The longest profile of the finish being the slightly tingly. It still has room to entice and leaves me wanting more.

Overall: A decent absinthe that is great to put things in perspective. I would recommend it as a great absinthe to evaluate and identify the trinity (anise, fennel, and Grande Wormwood). It is great both for newcomers and serious Absintheurs. It is not one dimensional and not complex. This would be a good everyday absinthe.

3 results - showing 1 - 3
 
 
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