Reviews written by jaysthename

19 results - showing 1 - 19
 
 
Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by jaysthename     April 01, 2011
Overall rating 
 
3.6
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Un Emile 45 2.0

Un Emile is an absinthe which debuted a few years ago to generally low-to-middle reviews. The recipe has been reformulated recently, and has just now hit the market. I was fortunate enough to have gotten a bottle as a gift with purchase at the end of February, and I wasn't sure what to expect.

To start with, the fragrance and taste are strong with what seems like a mix of extra hyssop and perhaps a little lavender, but as I'm not certain about the particulars, only that it is very meadowlike without being the least bit grassy. The color is a little bit thin, having too much yellow, but it's not bad.

I tried the drink first at a ratio of 4.5:1, but realized that was too far too much water. When I tried it again at 2.5:1 and 3:1 though, this absinthe really shined. I think folks who like the powerful aroma of Berthe de Joux will enjoy this one, as the Un Emile 45 also has a strong (but more herbal and less floral) scent, and tastes best with a reduced water-to-absinthe ratio. Regardless of the amount of water used, the louche is a bit oily and unspectacular.

I never had a chance to try the original formulation, but I like the "springtime" feel of the new Un Emile 45 very much. Although it has an unusual profile and would never be a daily drink for me, this would be welcome as a first absinthe of the day on a hot summer afternoon (not least because the finish doesn't last very long, and as such keeps your palate ready for the next drink).

While I wouldn't recommend this one as a benchmark absinthe for someone new, Un Emile is a fine treat for the right occasion and a very good bargain for the price.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by jaysthename     March 07, 2011
Overall rating 
 
3.7
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Fleur de absinthe

The Berthe de Joux is an absinthe which I can't pretend I didn't receive with some level of expectation, based on its glowing early reviews. Nonetheless, here is my objective review.

The color was acceptable, though not exceptional. I found it to be a composite of green with a strong citrine yellow overtone. All in all, it was fine, but not perfect.

Likewise, the louche was active, but rather short-lived. Again, it certainly didn't set the bar for the category, but neither was it disappointing.

The aroma and flavor are both categories where the BdJ's uniqueness comes into play. The aroma is noteworthy for sure, being far more flowery than anything else which I've experienced. It was nonetheless balanced, but I found the profile to be of narrow appeal, meaning that it would be quite welcome on a warm spring or hot summer day, but certainly not an everyday favorite.

As for the flavor itself, it took me a long while to warm up to it. Fresh out of the new bottle, I found it to be skewed heavily toward an aromatic floweryness, but as the open bottle aged a bit, it mellowed out into a nicely-balanced absinthe in which the fine wormwood was finally able to emerge.

Overall, while the BdJ wasn't able to live up to the gargantuan expectations which early reviews imbued it with, it's still a fine absinthe.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by jaysthename     March 07, 2011
Overall rating 
 
4.5
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

It's no mystery - Mystique is magnificent

This review is a long time coming from me, given that I first started enjoying my bottle of Doubs Mystique in October of last year. Given that I've just finished it, I've decided it's high time to post my thoughts.

The only thing which I found lacking in the Mystique is the first category of the rating system - color. A lot of folks have essentially said that it's the appropriate greenish color with a bit of yellow, but my experience was reversed; I found it to be yellow-green with a flush of the appropriate peridot.

That being said, the Mystique was excellent in almost every other respect. The aroma is heavenly, and while the louche was a bit too oily to be perfect, I have to credit it with being active for a long time and finishing with a fine opalescence. The flavor itself is fantastic, with an exceptional wormwood taking front and center, yet balanced finely with fennel, anise, and a hint of lemon balm. The finish is likewise exceptional, hanging onto the best qualities of the flavor so well that you simply must have another sip.

In short, if this absinthe were more cost-effective, I'd gladly have a daily dose. I won't say that it's not worth every penny, because it is - but with more than a couple other absinthes which are just as worthy and are also a bit less expensive, it won't be able to claim my top spot for numero uno. Nonetheless, cost aside, the Mystique is definitely in my top five.

Faux Absinthe
Reviewed by jaysthename     January 04, 2011
Overall rating 
 
1.3
Appearance 
 
1.0
Louche 
 
2.0
Aroma 
 
2.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
1.0
Finish 
 
1.0
Overall 
 
1.0

The Hills Are Not Alive With the Sound of Absinthe

After having made a purchase of absinth(e) last year, some vendor or other included a small sample of Hill's as a free gift. I was somewhat glad, actually, considering that I wanted to sample one of the Czech absinths without having to pay for it, given the overwhelmingly negative reviews I'd heard and read.

Unscrewing the cap and taking a whiff, I was struck with the smell of strong alcohol, and not much else. Given that I didn't smell anything inappropriate to absinthe, I have to give the Hill's a 2 in this category.

In terms of louche, I have to say that in spite of what others have observed, I did detect a slight cloudiness. Granted, it was far too oily to be appropriate, but there was a little bit of activity.

As for the flavor, I can't add too much here that hasn't been said before. I imagine this is what a bottom shelf "mint vodka" might taste like. Yes, it truly is very "Scope"=like.

There was a noticeable numbing for the finish, but the razor-thin mouthfeel combined with a completely inappropriate flavor cannot earn the Hill's more than a 1 in this category.

This product is clearly not an absinthe in the authentic, historical sense of that liquor. As an ingredient in an unrelated mixed drink, it might be acceptable, but there was nothing about the Hill's which made me want to experiment with it in that capacity.

Reviewed by jaysthename     October 07, 2010
Overall rating 
 
4.1
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
3.0

The fine stylings of the brothers Leopold

Color - It may seem repetitive to describe it as a clear, medium peridot, but that's essentially what it is, with just the barest trace of gold.

The aroma is pleasing to me in the way that many of the American offerings are, and many of the European offerings are not: there is no tang of grassiness or vegetable matter, and the spiciness is enjoyable without being overwhelming.

I found the louche to be a touch oily and not as active or long-lasting as some, but it produces a beautiful aqua glow at the surface.

The taste is clean and refreshing without being vapid. The bite of the wormwood nips at your tongue, but it isn't so intense as to overpower the slightly spicy mixture of fennel and possibly coriander, with the sweetness of fennel. However, be sure to not overwater this absinthe, as it's easy to do. 3.5 to 1 seemed just right to me.

The finish provided an appropriately mild numbness that lets you enjoy each subsequent sip.

Additional note:

I bought this bottle in November of 2009 and finished it up about a month ago. While it is not available through my preferred vendor (DUNY), it is well worth seeking out. Since there's some confusion about the "overall" category, I'll clarify that I'm using it to balance out the rating average, and it's not indicative of how I feel about the absinthe overall (that would be more of a 4).

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by jaysthename     April 08, 2010
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

Clearly a favorite

This review is based on a bottle purchased in the fall of 2009 and sampled over the past 6 months.

I'm not an expert on blanches, but of the four which I have tried to date, La Capricieuse was the clearest. I'd guess that the distiller is well aware of how sharp and crystalline this one is, because the bottle is likewise devoid of any color.

The scent is mild, with a slight aroma of mint and meadows. The louche is active and exciting to watch, with gauzy, cirrus clouds lasting a fair length of time.

The taste and the finish is where La Capricieuse excels. It has a crisp bitterness and is not overly sweet, and it takes very well to a full measure of sweetener (as usual, I like agave). The finish itself is impeccable, with a very pleasant, lingering aftertaste that leaves a nice tingling on your tongue.

La Capricieuse is an extraordinary absinthe that I would recommend to anyone, and is currently my favorite blanche.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by jaysthename     April 06, 2010
Overall rating 
 
3.2
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Middle-of-the-pack blanche

La Valote has a fine clarity and color, with only a slight amount of haziness. Unfortunately, it also has a pungent odor that I don’t care for. The scent of grassiness (or even earthiness, as BR suggests above) is overwhelming to me prior to loucheing, although it thankfully calms down almost completely with watering.

The louche was present and well-defined without being either oily or milky, but it was over very quickly.

La Valote's taste, while acceptible, is that of a simple, “stripped down” bitterness. It was not unpleasant, but it was unremarkable. This absinthe is also easily overwatered, so be careful with your ratios (I found that 4:1 was as far as it could go). The finish was sound, but very short to the point of hardly being there, barely eking out a 3 in this category.

Overall, La Valote is a decent, drinkable absinthe which could use some significant tweaking in its formulation.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by jaysthename     April 06, 2010
Last updated: April 06, 2010
Overall rating 
 
4.5
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
5.0

The Secret's Out

This review is based on several glasses of LCB from between September os 2009 and March of 2010.

When it comes to blanches, it makes more sense to speak of clarity rather than color, and the clarity of Clandestine is fairly sharp, with a little bit of opalescence. But it's the aroma of this one which caught my attention -- it is one of a pleasant, spicy mintiness that outshiness any of the other three blanches I've tried to date.

As hinted at by the aroma, taste was just as spicy, but not overwhelming or too intense. In fact, the minty sharpness of the wormwood was very well balanced. The finish is equally pleasant, although I had expected it to last a little bit longer. Admittedly, I prefer my vertes, but this is an exceptional blanche and I would never refuse a glass.

I prefered this one mixed at a 4.5:1 ratio, with a teaspoon of light agave nectar. Others have noted that blanches tend to taste sweeter to them than vertes, but I didn't find this one to be so much sweeter as to warrant changing my normal amount of sugaring.

Vintage Absinthe
Reviewed by jaysthename     September 10, 2009
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

A classic glass


This review was based on a 20ml sample that I prepared on Labor Day (three days ago).

Color: A true 'feuille mort', this particular 'dead leaf' being halfway between amber and tobacco.

Louche: There was very little observable action to the louche. That which was there started from the bottom of the glass and then filled the rest of the glass quickly and subtly.

Aroma: The aroma of the EP was complex and extremely enjoyable. I found it to have a sort of vanilla tobacco smell, having less of an anise scent and more of the fennel. My ability to distinguish other herbs is not yet refined, but high-quality wormwood could be detected easily.

Taste: The taste was outstandingly rich. Undoubtedly the fragrances mentioned above contributed to the flavor, but
ultimately there was a complex profile that was spicy, but without the "bite" that most spicy drinks can have. This
mellowness was possibly due to the century of aging, and attempting to distinguish the various flavors was pleasantly difficult as a result, since anything from hyssop to elecampane may have lost its pungency. My girlfriend Sabre had a few sips, and she found it reminiscent of a pre-sweetened honey chamomile tea she acquired in Spain, also tasting a fairly prominent maple/molasses flavor. She presumed that the EP may even have been distilled with some sort of nut or root (such as burdoch root), and with absinthe recipes being such a closely guarded secret then (as now), it's likely there were at least one or two "secret weapons" in the distellers' arsenals. food recipes we had tried which used brown mustard and fenugreek also came to mind.

Finish: There was a very tasty, long-lasting finish that never became bitter, and which was hardly tongue-numbing at all.

Overall: Vintage absinthes are interesting because we are not truly experiencing what the absinthe tasted like when it was originally enjoyed, but rather what it has become after decades of aging (in this case, a full century). It is likely that some of the alcohol has broken down and the flavor profile altered, even if only slightly. Having said that, if every absinthe aged as this Edouard had, I would find it very hard to not have a couple of glasses every day, as this one was exquisite.

Reviewed by jaysthename     August 18, 2009
Overall rating 
 
3.9
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
4.0

I Like Ike!

[NOTE: The source for my three sample glasses was from a trade of absinthe aged at least one year, so it’s possible that time and/or exposure may have affected some of the results of my review when compared to other reviews.]

COLOR: This one had an appropriately green color for a verte. The peridot was a bit pale, but it didn’t edge into the yellow spectrum like some others.

AROMA: The nose was a pleasantly clean, with the scent of minty wormwood being most prominent. It would have been better if the aroma had been a little more expansive, as you had to be close to the glass to detect it.

LOUCHE: A potentially active, though delicate, louche. I achieved more energetic results with a thin stream of cold water than I did with a fountain drip - thin trails developed briefly into small roiling clouds with the stream, while some minor cascades barely registered on the drip.

FLAVOR: This Eichelberger has an excellent balance, with a pleasantly peppery bite when prepared with an appropriate amount of water. It may be interpreted as having too mild of a flavor to some, but I found it refreshing and more enjoyable than other “crisp” absinthes (such as Lucid, for example) as long as there wasn’t too much water.

FINISH: The mouthfeel is right in the sweet spot of the midrange (being neither too thick, nor too thin), and the faint taste of pepper (with a lemony trace) and mint lingers pleasantly for a long while.

OVERALL: I am impressed with the Eichelberger, and I think it would make a great everyday absinthe if only it were on the shelves here in the United States. It is easy to overwater this absinthe, which overpowers the best of what it has to offer, and for me I found 4:1 to be a good ratio of water to spirit. A ratio of 4.5: 1 is the very upper limit, and going beyond that is not recommended. If anything, I would recommend erring on the low end, and trying this one at 3.5:1. Given the reported propensity for bartenders in the U.S. to err on the side of too little water (or sliding you a glass that holds no more than 4 or 5 oz total), I believe it would do well in the bar scene, too.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by jaysthename     August 11, 2009
Last updated: August 11, 2009
Overall rating 
 
3.8
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Elegantly bitter

NOTE: I was provided with a 1 oz blind sample of the 2008 2nd edition courtesy of bksmithey, and reviewed it as I would any other absinthe. However, my review was based entirely on a single glass rather than the three or more I normally have before posting my comments, so please keep that in mind.

COLOR: First of all, the unlouched color of this vert was gold, with the barest trace of green without quite making it to "light olive". After the louche, it was quite a pale yellow, again with the barest hint of green. [I have since been told that it was “quite green” when it was new, but turned to this color after a few months.]

AROMA: The aroma was pleasant and light, but not particularly complex. Anise and/or fennel was at the forefront (I'm still learning to differentiate these, but it seemed to be fairly fennel-heavy), although a strong streak of wormwood formed the backbone of the scent. There was a noticeable tinge of something that I couldn’t put my finger on (bksmithey compared it to baby powder, which is not far off) and thought perhaps it originated from the vial or packaging of the sample, so I didn’t mention it at first. I have since confirmed that it is from the absinthe itself. The aroma is not unpleasant (and is all but gone after loucheing) but it is odd.

LOUCHE: In spite of the experiences others have reported, I have to say that the louche was nicely active for me, with oily trails developing into a nice quilt of cirrus cloud-like formations. It didn’t last very long, but it was enjoyable. I do use very cold water by default, though, so that might be why I had better than average results.

FLAVOR: Once I tasted it, the wormwood came to the front and the anise/fennel took a backseat. The bitterness had a pleasant bite which was strong, but the fine quality of the wormwood used made it an enjoyable sip (and edged this from a 3 to a 4). Overall, the flavor came across as a bit simplistic, but elegantly done. I found that it could be pushed to 4.5:1 and still be good, but started getting noticeably weak at 5:1. Those with a bitter tooth would likely rate this one very highly.

FINISH: The mouthfeel was not thin, though not particularly creamy, but there was just the right amount of tongue-numbing. For such a high ABV (72%), the distiller did a fine job balancing everything.

OVERALL: While it might be near the upper limits of what I would find pleasantly bitter even after sweetening, I enjoyed this and would not refuse another glass.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by jaysthename     July 25, 2009
Last updated: April 06, 2010
Overall rating 
 
3.6
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Crisp and clear

Color: This was the first blanche I've tried, so I had no means of comparison at the time of my original review. The absinthe was clear when poured, with only the slightest amount of any haze or diffusion, but I've since tried three other blanches and am dropping this one from a 4 to a 3 on that count, since the clarity was not as sharp in comparison.

Louche: The louche was a bit too greasy-looking, compounded by the fact that there was little activity beyond the oily trails themselves. It picked up some pleasant-looking billows eventually, but it didn't last very long via the fountain method. However, with a carafe-style stream of water, the louche lasts to at least 4:1, which is notable.

Aroma: This one seems to have a crisp, rich wormwood with some sweetness that captures your attention immediately without being overbearing. There was just the tiniest bit of sourness and grassiness prior to loucheing, but the aroma rounds out in mid-louche.

Flavor: PF is light and refreshing without being simple or one-dimensional, even if the nice minty bitterness of the wormwood grabs your attention immediately. Unlike the other blanches I've tried, this one is noticeably sweet already, but a half teaspoon of agave gives it a more luxurious mouthfeel.

Finish: The finish is not too heavy nor extremely long-lasting, but leaves a pleasant aftertaste.

Overall: Pere Francois is a welcome glass of Alpine-inspired refreshment that is a perfect counterbalance to the heat of summer. I had initially expected blanches to be weak compared to the vertes, but in fact the flavor of this one was light, sharp, and very tasty. This is my girlfriend's favorite of the blanches, and I would recommend it to anyone who has a bit of a sweet tooth. Since I didn't find this one to be as pleasantly complex, I dropped my original "overall" rating from a 4 to a 3.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by jaysthename     July 25, 2009
Last updated: August 18, 2009
Overall rating 
 
3.9
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
4.0

A fine French offering

Color: Vieux Pontarlier has a color that is not unattractive, but is too far on the yellow side of the spectrum to qualify as a true peridot. However, after having been opened for a month or two it does age to a more appropriate color.

Louche: The louche was active, with nice, roiling clouds that weren't too thick nor milky. This is one category in which this absinthe truly shined.

Aroma: Upon first opening the bottle a few weeks ago, I found the VP to have a somewhat grassy or spinachy aroma which I found off-putting. This has since mellowed out some, but it is still present before loucheing; after the louche, the smell is far less concentrated and merely average.

Flavor: Some have cited a mintiness in VP, but to my palate it seems like a strong, distinctive wormwood. I'm new to absinthe, and I may be wrong about this, but I simply find it to be heavy on the wormwood and spicy zing. This is one of the few absinthes that I add a full measure of sweetener (1 tsp of agave nectar), at which point the flavor is full and enjoyable. A ratio of 4.5 or 5:1 worked best for me.

Finish: The wormwood leaves its mark on the tongue, with a numbing that lasts a bit longer than it should. The aftertaste is bitter, but not excessively so, although it does remain well after the flavor has gone.

Overall: I'm glad to say that my initial concerns about what the funky aroma may indicate the flavor would be like were proven to be of little concern at all. Vieux Pontarlier is a solid offering that may not rate as highly as some, but is a tasty absinthe that I would not turn down.

Reviewed by jaysthename     July 01, 2009
Last updated: August 18, 2009
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

Beautifully bitter

Color: The vivid green peridot color of Meadow Of Love is even brighter than that of it's close relative, Walton Waters, although there is a bit of haze. When louched, it retains very light greenish hues and never veers into yellow. As with my bottle of WW, this is a new bottle (I bought mine in mid-June, and the bottle is marked as batch 09-7, bottle 33). Since it is clear it may not retain the same color indefinitely without transfering it to a dark bottle.


Louche: The louche begins as soon as the water is added, and it slowly builds from cascades into clouds. Interestingly enough, the activity travels from the bottom to the top, with billowing clouds forming into a colored meniscus at the top well after the louche has all but finished on the bottom half of the glass. The entire process is enjoyable to watch.

Aroma: The initial aroma has a bite to it, with slight bitterness and a hint of sourness. While not as floral or
initially accessible to me as WW, I found that with each new glass (on different days) I became more acclimated to it, and may now appreciate it more thoroughly for what it offers.

Flavor: Meadow Of Love is everything I expected it to be -- a slightly bitter (and spicier) cousin to WW that is every bit as enjoyable, but in different way. The flavor is outstanding, and while I cannot yet determine all the herbs individually, I believe the distinct uniqueness it offers is probably a result of the violet other reviewers have mentioned.

Unlike the WW, I found the ideal balance for my tastes at 4.5:1 or even 5:1, where the bitterness and spice is tempered a bit. Those who enjoy the bitterness will likely find a 4:1 ratio to be most appealing. Sweetening is not absolutlely necessary, but half a teaspoon of agave nectar fills the flavor out quite nicely.

Finish: The mouthfeel is full, rich and creamy, with a lasting finish that edges out the WW just slightly here. The aftertaste is wonderful, with a medium amount of numbing to prickle your tongue with.

Overall: Meadow Of Love is an extraordinary offering from Delaware Phoenix, which has rapidly cornered the market on my favored absinthes. Admittedly, I have a ways to go in my absinthe taste tests, but it will be difficult to top these two. While I still prefer WW a bit, the high quality of Meadow Of Love is evident in every sip, and those of you with a bitter tooth will love it.

Reviewed by jaysthename     June 03, 2009
Last updated: June 03, 2009
Overall rating 
 
4.9
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
5.0

So close to perfect I can taste it!

Color: The vibrant, rich peridot color of Walton Waters is beautiful and the definition of what I think an absinthe verte should look like. When louched, the brilliance softens, but it is still definitely in the peridot family, as opposed to the variations on yellow-green that I have often seen in other absinthes. The color in both cases is as near to perfect as I could possibly imagine. As to whether or not it will stay that way as it ages (my bottle is dated 09-4, presumably April 2009), I won't know for a long while, but I'm not sure I would even say that matters unless some sort of review standards for aged absinthe are set up.

Louche: Soft cascades of oil to start, which then slowly escalades into billowy clouds and then a roiling storm. Mesmerizing. Beautiful.

Aroma: Pleasantly floral, with a bouquet of extremely well-balanced herbs filling the room. The green anise is soft and alluring, but all of the botanicals are orchestrated skillfully into one masterpiece of scent.

Flavor: Walton Waters offers an outstanding, refined flavor. Green anise and fennel are certainly there, but there's something else that is both a little peppery and sweet, without being minty -- this is possibly the lemon thyme that others have cited. I found the ideal balance for my tastes at 4:1, where the spiciness is present but subdued, and the flavor fills out completely. At 4.5:1, the taste is equally delicious, having the presence of a light herbal earthiness, with only the ghost of spiciness. Sweetening is not necessary at all with this absinthe, but as has always been the case, I've found that a half teaspoon of agave nectar adds even more of a creamy fullness.

Finish: This one offers a rich and creamy mouthfeel (even before the agave sweetener is added), with a delicious aftertaste of coriander and fennel, accompanied by only the slightest numbing to the tongue. I would prefer that the finish last just a touch longer, as it is so good.

Overall: Walton Waters is fantastic, and the best absinthe I've had yet. I drank my sample glasses during the last weekend of May, approximately a month or so after it was made, and the idea that it is still considered young and will age to become even better is almost unfathomable to me. If the aging process causes the finish to last longer, this absinthe might very well be perfect.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by jaysthename     May 30, 2009
Overall rating 
 
2.4
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
1.0
Overall 
 
2.0

Ruined by the finish

La Charlotte’s unlouched color is an almost pure gold which is attractive but unexpected and not entirely appropriate given that it is an un-aged verte. Louched, the color is that of straw with a hint of peridot finally showing.

This absinthe has an active louche, with white tendrils appearing early on in the watering. However, these are too milky and thick, providing no opacity.

Anise is practically the only detectable aroma, even after the water drip begins. It is not an anise-bomb exactly, but it is too simple and unremarkable.

The flavor starts out a little too bitter and with too much anise, but it is not horrible -- and then the bitterness takes over completely. Even watered to 4:1 or 5:1 it is overpowering. Adding more sugar just makes the drink cloyingly sweet on one hand, and does not eliminate the bitterness, either.

The finish is where this absinthe lacks terribly. What might otherwise have been an average absinthe was ruined for me by the acrid aftertaste that does not go away.

Overall, I would not recommend this to anyone. Even those people who enjoy a bitter bite to their absinthe would find this one wooden and unrelenting. I struggled to mark the flavor as a 2 instead of a 1 simply because the overwhelmingly bitter aftertaste wipes away the memory of the decent enough taste.

Reviewed by jaysthename     May 29, 2009
Last updated: July 22, 2009
Overall rating 
 
4.6
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
5.0

Pacifique is nearly perfect

Color: Pacifique has a natural-looking peridot color that is a little bit lighter than what I believe could be considered 'perfect' for a verte. Nevertheless, it is very appealing, with no visible sediment nor much in the way of haziness. The green edges toward a golden straw color as it is louched.

Louche: Oily curls evolve into bell-shaped cascades about the time that the water-to-absinthe ratio reaches 1:1. After that, the bells thicken and blossom briefly into opalescent clouds which beatifully refract blue and green hues, remaining active until nearly 3:1. The entire process is engaging, but not easily seen without good lighting.

Aroma: The green anise in Pacifique is most notable for its restraint, with herbs such as fennel and coriander being more prominent. The overall aroma is complex but unified, with no simple scent of alcohol to distract from it.

Flavor: Pacifique has an excellent, well-balanced flavor. The bitterness of the wormwood and (to a lesser extent) the hyssop blends wonderfully with the comparitively subdued anise and fennel, with hints of melissa. There is a slight mintiness that I would also attribute to the hyssop, with coriander acting as the fulcrum over which the entirety hinges.

Finish: The mouthfeel leaves a pleasant aftertaste of coriander that lingers just long enough to make you want another sip.

Overall: Pacifique is a marvelous absinthe full of subtle complexity that I would heartily recommend to anyone. The fact that it is produced using organic botanicals is a testimony to the dedication to quality that is apparent in every sip. I've sampled this on three separate occasions over the past three days, and am still working on the full flavor profile, but that's partly because I'm new at tasting absinthe. To date, though, this is the best absinthe I've had, being noticeably better than Lucid and Obsello.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by jaysthename     May 27, 2009
Last updated: May 27, 2009
Overall rating 
 
4.1
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
4.0

A crisp taste with a brilliant finish

Color: An ounce of Obsello poured into a glass results in a near-perfect peridot. After adding water to a 3:1 ratio, it is of course noticeably paler, but still pleasantly green. I'm surprised by how many people found it to be leaning heavily toward yellow or gold, as I simply saw a paler peridot after watering, but as with the louche (see below), this may depend partly on the light. There was no noticeable sediment and very little haziness.

Louche: Don't pour or drip your water too fast, or else you might miss the louche altogether. It arrives quickly, and disappears nearly as fast. While it's there, you'll mostly see billowy clouds, with the occasional tendril of cigarette-like smoke. Attractive blues and greens on my second attempt is what pushed the rating up to a 4 in this category, but you must have good lighting and a steady pour to find them.

Aroma: The scent of anise is prominent, but mint and a soft alcohol aroma are definitely present and not displeasing. As the water drip continues, the presence of the latter two recede somewhat, but the aroma remains crisp and refreshing.

Flavor: Obsello starts off as a well-balanced absinthe, with a medium-bitter wormwood taste that is softened by the grape neutral spirits and meshes nicely with the anise and fennel. Additional flavors that come through are mint, which is fairly prominent, and finally an aftertaste of citrus, which I would attribute largely to the melissa. Others noted having tasted vanilla and even a hint of candied plum, but I did not detect either of those two flavors. As I continued to drink, I found that the contrast between the two extremes of mintiness and bitterness made the flavor seem just slightly unbalanced and even a tad thin, like two strands of a previously thick rope being pulled apart in places. Keeping the water to absinthe ratio fairly low at 3:1 all but eliminated this effect, though.

Finish: The Obsello really shines in its finish, which is long and leaves a pleasant tingling and mild numbness on your tongue. By the time the palette of flavors recedes, the memory of it makes you want another sip.

Overall: I very much enjoyed this absinthe, and found it particularly refreshing here in late spring while the weather has been very warm. The taste is not completely balanced at all times, but the mild complexity is intriguing in a lazy afternoon sort of way, and the taste is interesting while the finish is crisp and invigorating.

I would definitely recommend it, particularly to those looking to try their second or third absinthe and are working their way up the bitterness scale after having tried Lucid or the equivalent (as I did).

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by jaysthename     May 18, 2009
Last updated: May 18, 2009
Overall rating 
 
3.8
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

My first taste of absinthe is mild and pleasant

For my first experience with absinthe, I chose Lucid, partly due to its availability in my local stores, and partly because the general consensus here at WS and other sites was that it's a good absinthe to use as a baseline for judging more complex absinthes.

I purchased this bottle in December of 2008, and opened it here in mid-March 2009. Taking the advice of others, I let it air for about an hour before tasting. I had two glasses on the first night, then two glasses the following night, and I am basing my review primarily on the second tasting.

Color: The color was a nice golden peridot prior to loucheing. There was minimal haziness. After loucheing, the color changed to a pale peridot verging on yellow, but it was not unattractive.

Louche: The louche began almost immediately, being fully underway at a 1:1 ratio and over by about the 2:1 point. Nonetheless, the thin and wispy strands resulting from a fine fountain drip were enjoyable to watch, however brief they may have been. For a second glass, my less steady pour with a mini-carafe formed slightly thicker clouds.

Aroma: There was a pleasant mix of vibrant anise with a strong scent of fennel that fully opened up once the water drip began, but also diminished significantly at the 2:1 point.

Flavor: The flavor was not complex, and was a little less bitter than I expected it to be, but the simple combination of the 'holy trinity', along with a slight note of something almost like celery, was mild and refreshing. Granulated sugar detracted from my first glass, in that the sweetness was very pronounced at first and was followed by bitterness, but a half teaspoon of organic blue agave nectar in the second glass made for a much fuller and more-balanced taste.

Finish: The Lucid has a smooth, mild finish with only mild numbing at 3:1 or 4:1. The aftertaste lingers only briefly, but is pleasant.

Overall: After trying at various strengths, I found that around 3:1 or 3.5:1 was the best ratio for water to absinthe to bring out the best qualities of the Lucid. Anything above 4:1 results in a weak, watered down taste. While this absinthe has a fine flavor when completely unsweetened, I found that the agave nectar complimented it very well, and much better than granulated sugar. Some have said that the Lucid has been "oversimplified" for mild American tastes and that may be true, but I found it to be pleasant and refreshing, and would recommend it to anyone who wants an absinthe with a lower amount of bitterness.

19 results - showing 1 - 19
 
 
Powered by JReviews

We Recommend ...

Banner
f logo twitter logo flickr button in logo