Reviews written by Tally Ho

12 results - showing 1 - 12
 
 
Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Tally Ho     February 15, 2009
Overall rating 
 
3.8
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

My current go-to absinthe

Color: Shabba's description as a deep emerald/forest is dead on. I had to penalize it a bit for the sediment though. I believe absinthe's should be rewarded for being clear and free of sediment or haze.

Louche: I prefer this absinthe at 2.5:1, so naturally my louche was thick. It acquired that opalescence and was attractive. I'll nitpick though and say it could have built a bit better and more slowly. My barometer for a 5 in this category are the Edouard & Marteau, so it's a high bar.

Aroma: I found this to be complex, interesting and delightful. I really had trouble picking out what was going on in there outside of the holy trinity. I had to cheat and ask for the herb bill, and was surprised when I found out all but 1 ingredient (genepi) were common absinthe ingredients. I thought there were very unique things in here. Again though, my benchmark for a 5 in aroma are quite high, and to me Jade N-O & Belle Amie are a rung above all other commercials in this category. Like the L'Italienne, consider is a strong 4.

Flavor: Delicious. Like I said, my personal sweet spot for this absinthe is 2.5:1. At that ratio you still have a touch of alcohol heat, some (desirable) astringency from the genepi, and the flavors are robust. As you water this absinthe to more than 3:1 it falls apart IMO. It flattens out and there is a subtle note not unlike chlorine or bleach that becomes noticeable. It doesn't take well to over-watering, but then again, I've yet to meet an absinthe that does.

Finish: Semi-long and enjoyable with cooling, minty wormwood and creamy fennel.

Overall: This stuff has turned into my go-to absinthe because it's readily available on the shelves where I live, priced reasonably, and (above all else) I like it quite a bit. It also works well in cocktails, I think. I will always have a bottle of this on hand.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Tally Ho     December 28, 2008
Overall rating 
 
4.2
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

This stuff is delicious

Color: A deep green. I was debating on whether or not to penalize it for being over-colored, but decided that it didn't quite cross that line. It's just darker than your average verte.

Louche: A nice louche. There is some decent layering and it doesn't form immediately. It obtains that opalescence we all love. Almost earns a 5 but I'd consider it a rung below that of the Edouard & Marteau.

Aroma: This is an entirely different lady than the Belle Amie. This one is more delicate. The wormwood and anise are nowhere near as prominent, and the floral bouquet found in the former have been replaced by more fruity, citrus notes. It's remarkable how little alcohol heat there is for something at 72%. There is this wonderful smell that supersedes all others, and I just can't put a finger on what it is. After thinking about it it came to me what it reminded me of... lemon lime jello. I realize that may not sound tempting, but believe me, it works.

Flavor: From a straight flavor standpoint, this is one of the most delicious absinthes I've ever had. That anise stays in the backround and those delightful notes of fresh fruit and citrus tease your taste buds. It does have that slightly vegetal quality characteristic of Devoille absinthes. (which I happen to like, btw), but it's very subtle and less prominent than it is in the VdF. Wonderful use of lemon balm. Now it hits me... could that lemon lime note be a combination of this and some other herb? The wormwood comes out to play as well, in perfect harmony with everything else. It doesn't demand your attention as much as it did in the Belle Amie.

Finish: Ah, there's that fennel. The fresh fruit comes along for the ride as well and the wormwood lets you know it's there, imparting an ever so slight, desirable bitterness. I didn't get any numbing sensation. I wouldn't describe the duration as long, but it hangs around for awhile.

Overall: I'm a big fan of this absinthe. It's flavor profile is very unique, in a good way. It's unlike any other I have had.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Tally Ho     December 28, 2008
Overall rating 
 
2.8
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
2.0

Not a fan

Color: A cross between olive and yellow, and far too much on the yellow side. Not what I would call an attractive verte color.

Louche: The louche is decent enough. It doesn't build particularly well and starts quickly, but that's pretty standard. It gets thick enough.

Aroma: One person's peculiar can be another's "interesting". I don't like what's going on in there personally. It's spicy and minty with underlying vanilla. The anise plays second fiddle. I find it to be thin and flat in some areas.

Flavor: That vanilla that is underlying in the nose is far more prominent in the palate. I find it overbearing and distracting. There's also a distinct nuttiness that reminds me of almond that I don't care for. The mint is still there and the anise comes forward. The wormwood is easily detectable.

Finish: Since I don't care for the taste I naturally won't be a fan of the finish either, but regardless it is lacking in the duration department and wouldn't score high in this facet even if I did care for it.

Overall: This is a quality offering, just not one I'm a fan of.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Tally Ho     October 01, 2008
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

One of my favorites

Color: A mixture of light olive and gold. Free of any sediment or haze. Attractive and natural looking.

Louche: Builds slowly from the bottom up, but lacks the trails and layering action that a superior louche provides. Doesn't get too thick, which I like. It was thick enough with an attractive milky green hue characteristic of a good verte. It doesn't obtain that opalescence though. Much like the Belle Amie, a slow drip and ice cold water is essential for getting a decent louche.

Aroma: Neat the aroma is wonderful. As soon as I opened the bottle I knew I was going to like this absinthe a lot. It possesses a delightful floral bouquet that dances all over your olfactory senses. It gave me deja-vu to a time standing in my great grandmother's garden in the spring long ago. The anise takes a back seat. Very clean, very floral. Not room filling, in fact it stays mostly in the glass. For this, and for the fact that I found the N-O and Belle Amie more complex I granted this a 4 instead of a 5.

Flavor: Delicious. That floral bouquet exploded onto your palate while that Italian Wormwood imparts a desirable bitterness. There is a strong "bite" in there that I enjoyed. I found that it contrasted some of the more delicate floral notes well. The only imbalance is that the anise plays second fiddle, but it works well in this absinthe. An offering like this makes me re-think my stance about the pre-dominant flavor in an absinthe having to be anise.

Finish: Long and enjoyable. The wormwood imparts a slight bitterness while that creamy fennel finally makes it's presence known. IMO that's how fennel should work in an absinthe. It imparted a slight numbing sensation, which I found desirable.

Overall: This is one of my favorite offerings to date. I have a feeling this stuff has good aging potential, if one has the willpower to do so. I look forward to trying more of Stefano's creations.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Tally Ho     June 09, 2008
Overall rating 
 
2.6
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
2.0

An American beer drinkers absinthe

Color: Light olive. Somewhat dull and unremarkable but looks natural. After louche the color is murky, like dishwater.



Louche: The louche begins forming immediately. It could be thicker, but I wouldn't describe it as thin. It never becomes opaque. Not very attractive.



Aroma: Something immediately strikes me as "off" in the aroma. Not something I'd describe as clean. I find the peppery notes a bit distracting as well, but not all bad. Perhaps just a bit too heavy handed. The wormwood presence is more forward than I expected. And of course the predominant note is anise, no surprise there.



Flavor: Again I'm getting something I can only describe as "murky". It's pretty flat and uninteresting, like a light American beer. No flavors really jump out on my palate and demand my attention. Not very complex. I get that anise and underlying wormwood, along with the peppery presence.



Finish: The fennel becomes more noticeable in the finish along with a slight wormwood bitterness. Lingering but I wouldn't describe the duration as long.



Overall: I know that this is a quality made product, which is what I want to see entering the U.S. market. I'm just not a fan of this particular brand. I wonder if Ted attempted to cater to what we all know about the typical American beer preference (bland, watered down) when crafting this? This absinthe is to American beer as his Jades are to a full bodied ale.

Reviewed by Tally Ho     June 06, 2008
Overall rating 
 
3.7
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

A quality, traditional La Bleue in the U.S.

Color: It's a blanche and it's perfectly clear.



Louche: Thick and opaque. Nice trails, nice layering but it builds too quickly.



Aroma: The fennel in Kubler is very forward and unmistakable. The fennel and anise are dominant. The wormwood is very subdued but if you really look for it it's there. I struggled with whether to grant this a 3 or a 4. I don't find it peculiar or unpleasant, but I do consider it unbalanced. I'll go with a 4 because while I don't find it interesting it certainly isn't incorrect or unpleasant.



Flavor: Pretty one dimensional. That anise and fennel overpower all else. It is clean and refreshing but a bit too sweet for my taste. Don't get me wrong, I enjoy it, but I couldn't drink too much of it at one time.



Finish: That creamy fennel comes out swinging in the finish and finally the wormwood makes it's presence known imparting a slight bitterness. All in all though not very complex and the duration isn't long.



Overall: This absinthe is all about the fennel. It's an herb I can discern quite easily due to chewing on it as a kid. I would find this product far more enjoyable if the wormwood profile was bumped up a bit and it wasn't as sweet. Still it's great to have a quality, traditional La Bleue on the U.S. market. The price point also makes it a good value - 1 ltr. for $60.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Tally Ho     June 04, 2008
Overall rating 
 
3.7
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Enjoyable, but a tad over-rated IMHO

Color: A vibrant, deep peridot green. Very attractive.



Louche: Slow forming, nice building/layering action. Morphs into an opalescent milky jade color. It just doesn't get much better.



Aroma: Anise is predominant. An ensemble of alpine herbs are noticeable. The wormwood takes a bit of a back seat but it's there. I also get mint and toasted honey. During louche once again the anise is the predominant note, but the alpine herbs blossom into a nice bouquet. I think I can also detect a faint baby powder scent.



Flavor: Again, it's that anise that makes it's presence most noticeable. This certainly isn't an anise bomb like the VS but it's quite forward. Those alpine herbs aren't far behind imparting a nice crisp, refreshing taste. There's something spicy going on in there as well, but I don't know what to attribute it to. The wormwood is easily detectable but plays second fiddle to the other flavors.



Finish: I find the finish to be pretty standard. The wormwood finally comes through a bit more imparting a slight lingering bitterness. I wouldn't describe the duration as long either.



Overall: It's obviously a quality made traditional offering. When it first came out I was a huge fan but after expanding my palate a bit and trying other commercial offerings I find this rather average by comparison (but certainly not bad).

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Tally Ho     May 30, 2008
Overall rating 
 
4.6
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
5.0

My favorite Jade

Color: A bright, attractive peridot green. A slight blue tinge appears when louched.



Louche: Pretty thick and opaque. Attractive. I wouldn't say it gets there too quick by any means but it could build slower.



Aroma: Very complex and interesting. There are so many things going on in there it's hard to isolate them. It has a noticeable fragrant wormwood presence along with of course the anise. Right up there along with them are unique notes I struggle to put a finger on. I think I can detect sea salt and a mustard-like tang in there, along with other spices reminiscent of a Christmas ale (I'm not the only one to draw this comparison). Not sure I'd call it room filling (it may depend on the size of the room), but you can be several feet away and still take it all in. Extremely delightful.



Flavor: Naturally everything I spoke of regarding the aroma is reflected in the flavor. It's very complex while balanced. Nothing overpowers the other allowing the wide variety of unique characteristics to take their turn on your taste buds. The wormwood presence is forward. Herbaceous, earthy and spicy. Again I'm getting that mustard tang and the Christmas spice, though they are more subdued in the palate than they are on the nose. Delicious.



Finish: Long and satisfying.



Overall: My favorite Jade and one of my favorite absinthe's period. This is something I'd like to have on hand at all times. It is very idiosyncratic and won't appeal to everybody, but to those it does appeal to it can become quite an addicting beverage.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Tally Ho     May 23, 2008
Overall rating 
 
3.8
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

One of my favorites

Color - Light green and natural looking.



Louche - Thin. A very slow drip does improve it but it still didn't get where I wanted it.



Aroma (Before louche) - Upon first opening the bottle the alcohol (not surprisingly) dominated all else. After getting some air into it the spicy, herbaceous notes came forward.



Aroma (After louche) - These spicy herbaceous notes poured out during the louche. Not room filling but it makes it's presence known.



Flavor - I wouldn't quite call this an herbal bomb like the original batch of 1797, but it certainly maintains that crisp, herbaceous tonic character. This time around it has better balance as the flavors are more well rounded. I thought it was delicious.



Overall - Obviously a quality made product and among my favorites.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Tally Ho     December 13, 2007
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

Belle Amie Review

I was quite taken by this offering. It is without any doubts the best absinthe I've had to date. I haven't had the pleasure of tasting pre-ban Berger, but from how I've heard it described there are similarities. Even the color resembles that of a pre-ban. I can imagine that over time it would acquire an almost identical dead leaf brown hue.



A nice louche, but not spectacular. It builds slowly from the bottom up. It could certainly be thicker.



The aroma is just amazing, the best I've ever experienced. Upon first opening the bottle the anise & fennel stood out, but after ample breathing time a ton of other notes made their way to the forefront, none overpowering the other. I really recommend preparing this absinthe in the traditional manner, not with a dripper. It allows the wonderful aromas to slowly unleash themselves without being blocked. It was like standing in an alpine garden in mid spring. Not "quite" room filling, but it certainly jumps out. As far as modern commercial absinthe goes, I'm not sure it has an equal in this regard.



They say taste is 2/3 smell (or something like that)... it's no surprise then that this stuff is absolutely delicious. Wonderful balance. Crisp, refreshing, clean, herbaecous, and that wonderful Pontarlier wormwood leaves you begging for another glass. I agree with Abs that the flavors that are there could perhaps be a "bit" more robust.



If this is what a Nimes style absinthe is, consider me a fan. I got an extra bottle to age and I have serious doubts that I'll have the will power to let that happen.



These "next gen" absinthes continue to impress me.

Retired Brands
Reviewed by Tally Ho     November 19, 2007
Overall rating 
 
4.5
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Absinthe Marteau

This absinthe is unique. The profile is completely different from any I've tasted before. There is hardly any bitterness, just a touch to balance things out. I won't get into specifics because two other better trained palates have already weighed in on this. I'll give the cliff notes version... It's delicious.



The color was quite nice and natural looking. The louche thick with lovely oil trails, morphed into an opalescent version of it's original color. I was nursing my second glass to the point where it even began to get slightly tepid, and the louche still didn't thin out a bit.



The best thing about this absinthe to me is the finish. It has a candy-like finish, leaves a taste in your mouth so delightful that you don't want to eat/drink anything else to ruin it. Stayed with me for hours after my last glass. One of the best I've ever experienced in this regard.



Good stuff, well done Hiram.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Tally Ho     August 12, 2007
Overall rating 
 
2.7
Appearance 
 
1.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Segarra 45 Review

I have to penalize the color severely because it was yellow. As I understand it it's due to being aged in oak barrels, but regardless it is a flaw. Once you get past that however, it's a pleasant drink that I enjoyed and would have again without any reservations. My friend claims it has benefited from a year of aging, I can only assume that would be true, as this is the first time I've tried Segarra. Certainly not one of the better absinthes I've had, but certainly not too shabby either. An acceptable middle shelf product IMO.

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