Reviews written by Andrew Young

60 results - showing 51 - 60
1 2 3  
 
Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Andrew Young     July 28, 2007
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Jade's odd man out

The colour neat is a pale blue-green, slightly hazy. The louche is beautiful. There's lots of wonderful stuff going on, but it's somewhat thin. The post-louche colour is wonderful, though. Jade green with yellow and blue nuances throughout. The aroma is odd and intriguing. There's a soft, chocolatey layer over light anise and great wormwood, with citrus notes and some musky undertones. That nice wormwood is upfront in the flavour. Anise and fennel are light and there's an underlying earthiness. There's a strange, salty flavour, reminiscent of sea salt. Anise doesn't really come out until the finish, which is lingering and delightful. The mouth-feel is rich but leaves some room for improvement. This is a strange absinthe. I don't always appreciate its idiosynchrasies but there are times when nothing else is right.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Andrew Young     July 28, 2007
Overall rating 
 
3.2
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

Simple, little Franky G.

The absinthe is the colour of pale straw with a hint of green. It appears natural and clear. The louche is attractive and interesting, building from the bottom, but it's over quickly. After water it's pearl white and a bit too thick. Looks like a blanche. The aroma is mostly anise with a bit of wormwood peeking through, with earthy tones. Simple but very pleasant. No surprises in the flavour, except that the wormwood is stronger than in the aroma. Otherwise what I taste is what I smell. There's more tongue-numbing than creaminess in the texture. The finish is crisp and refreshing. A tasty enough absinthe but definitely isn't an herbal powerhouse.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Andrew Young     July 27, 2007
Last updated: May 29, 2011
Overall rating 
 
3.3
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

The first absinthe to hit US shelves since the ban

05/29/11 Revisit

The colour has improved to a bright gold with a hint of green. There is a very slight haziness but it is otherwise quite attractive. The aroma is anise-forward, with some caramel and notes of green apple.

The louche is also improved. Almost white with a hint of greenish blue. Nice lightplay. After water the wormwood comes forward some. There's a dose of funky cumin. The unwanted caramel aroma is still there but has backed off a bit.

The flavour is dominated by very sweet, strong anise, but unfortunately the second most dominant flavour is the annoying funk. The wormwood lays back some. The caramel taste thankfully isn't anywhere near as strong as it used to be, which has a huge impact on the perception of freshness. There's a slight tartness and some spicy notes. The finish is a wall of numbing anise and not terribly complex.

It's definitely improved. There are still some crippling flaws but it has gone from being nearly undrinkable to a decent, middle-shelf absinthe.

Original review:

Lucid pours a pale, clear, natural olive. The louche is everywhere at once and lacking theatrics, but it does have good definition and refraction as it turns a pale yellow-green. The light aroma is of mostly anise and wormwood but also seems caramelized. All of these characteristics carry over into the simple, flat flavour. There are no noticeable notes of colouring herbs. Another flaw is a funky, sweaty taste but it's not dominating. However, I find the caramelly flavour over the top and highly distracting. The mouth-feel is fairly creamy and not too numbing. The finish is wormwood that seems to transform into fennel as it lingers. Lucid just doesn't taste like I expect absinthe to. It's got the basic, required components but they don't add up right.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Andrew Young     July 27, 2007
Last updated: January 21, 2010
Overall rating 
 
3.5
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

The first Duplais

The colour is very nice. It's nearly peridot, beginning to turn amber. Natural and clear. Louched, it's a jade green with lots of nuance, not too thick and not too thin. The aroma is a combination of floral, medicinal, and grassy, with citrus notes and a hint of sweet anise. The flavour is floral and fruity, with a good bit of coriander. Texture is disappointingly thin. The finish is moderately bitter, dominated by citrus, and short-lived. Annoying flaws for an otherwise tasty absinthe. However this is an older batch so some of these issues may have been corrected by now.

Edited 1/21/10

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Andrew Young     July 27, 2007
Overall rating 
 
4.1
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
4.0

The second Duplais

Being a blanche, it's perfectly clear. No errors, particles, or colours. The louche is very attractive. Slow to startm pretty contrails swirl with increasing speed. Separate tiers remain distinct for a long time and then quickly blend together. The louched drink is thick, perhaps a bit too much so. It's a nice enough white with some grey shades but nothing special. The aroma has a lot of wormwood. Anise is also quite present and tastes somewhat like star anise. Fennel and hyssop round it out. Wormwood asserts itself in the flavour from the beginning, followed by tangy anise and then fennel. Slightly minty and medicinal with a medium, wormwood-dominated finish. The mouth-feel is kinda of creamy but leaves something to be desired. It's a solid blanche with a unique character that is difficult to pinpoint, but I find it enjoyable.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Andrew Young     July 27, 2007
Last updated: July 27, 2007
Overall rating 
 
4.5
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

One of my faves.

Balance pours exactly peridot green. It's so nice it seems like it has to be artificial. Crystal clear. The louche is slightly too fast but otherwise gorgeous. An exquisitely defined, three-tiered louche with thickest on the bottom and unlouched on the top. The result is an absolutely beautiful pale green with lots of nuance and complexity. The aroma is tangy and floral. It almost seems to have a star anise presence but it's not obtrusive or annoying. Pontica and hyssop are detectable. The first thing I taste is a big coriander presence which gives way to strong, minty wormwood. Anise and pontica blend and become almost candylike. The Balance is creamy, but not mouth-coating. Finish is mostly wormwood and fennel and is long-lasting, finishing with a flavour reminiscent of tea leaves. I really enjoy this absinthe.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Andrew Young     July 27, 2007
Overall rating 
 
3.8
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Spicy Monty

Colour is green with a yellowish tinge. It's natural but hazy. The louche action is fast. It's thickest at the bottom but it builds everywhere at once. The result is an attractive, sea-green drink with lots of nuance. Not too thick, not too thin. Aroma is strongly cinnamon with some heat. A little bit of wormwood, with some orangey citrus, fruitiness, and minty wormwood. Cinnamon is the most upfront flavour, followed by wormwood. Dry and not overly anisey. Thick mouth-feel with a spicy bite. Moderate, dry, wormwoody finish with pine notes. To me this absinthe just screams "Yule."

Retired Brands
Reviewed by Andrew Young     July 27, 2007
Overall rating 
 
4.5
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Great absinthe.

The colour is a clear, natural olive, as my sample is a bit aged now. The louche is wonderful and full of character. It builds slowly from the bottom, rolling back and forth beneath a clear line that doesn't disappear until after it's become razor thin. The aroma is a gutpunch of big, minty, beautiful wormwood. Anise provides a luscious sweetness but plays second fiddle. That excellent wormwood is definitely on display in the flavour, with great quality anise and fennel floating throughout. Great complexity, yet it's all kind of blurred. Beyond the trinity it's difficult to discern individual herbs since everything is so cohesive. There's a bit of tasty pontica flavour but it's hard to pinpoint much else. This absinthe is quite mouth-coating but then becomes a bit too numbing. The finish is long and fruity, with lingering characteristics of the different herbs frequently usurping each other. I wish I had more of this absinthe.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by Andrew Young     July 27, 2007
Last updated: July 27, 2007
Overall rating 
 
3.5
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0

A simple pleasure

Crystal clear before louche like water. The louche itself is drab and quick, and too thick. Despite that it's an attractive pearl-white with bluish nuances. The aroma is fairly light and delicate. Anise is most noticeable, with a bit of floral wormwood. However, there's a weird smell that reminds me of the taste of aspirin tablets. The taste is also light and made of wormwood, anise, and fennel in that order. Floral and minty. Simple but tastes of quality ingredients. There's also a fruity flavour vaguely reminiscent of pineapple. It's a little on the thin side. The finish is wormwoody but short-lived. This is a nice, light absinthe that has a typical Val-de-Travers character.

Reviewed by Andrew Young     July 27, 2007
Overall rating 
 
2.5
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
2.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
1.0
Overall 
 
2.0

Oil mix alley

I know it's artificially coloured but it looks natural and attractive. It's clear green, slightly on the pale side. The louche is the best thing about this absinthe. It slowly rolls and builds from the bottom and has great definition. Only problem is that it's a bit too thick and milky. From there things start going wrong. The aroma is almost pure alcohol with some star anise and dusting-polish lemon. The flavour is star anise overload. That, combined with the lemony character, makes for a flavour that reminds me of licorice candy. Wormwood is barely there. The mouth-feel is thin and harsh and the finish is long and bitter. The wormwood oil added to this stuff causes far more bitterness than wormwood flavour. This product tastes extremely similar to Pernod Liqueur d'Anis, except with a harsher alcohol bite and an unpleasant bitterness.

60 results - showing 51 - 60
1 2 3  
 
Powered by JReviews

We Recommend ...

Banner
f logo twitter logo flickr button in logo