Reviews written by absinthist

60 results - showing 51 - 60
1 2 3  
 
Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     August 11, 2008
Overall rating 
 
3.9
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Verte from Helvetia???

Angelique was the first absinthe from Switzerland to be coloured verte and using wormwood in that process. A typical love-or-hate absinthe, coming from reliable Artemisia distillery.



Colour: very delicate greenish tinge, striving towards yellow, indicates traditional and natural colouration but for my taste could be much darker.



Louche: not too hasty, forms slowly, nice.



Aroma: inviting, herbal, alcoholic, fennel tries to overpower angelica and wormwood, finally absinthe from Switzerland where anise knows its place.



Flavour: Very complex, fiery and spicy, strong wormwoodiness follows the rest and the spiciness burns like a torch on the palate, very pleasant sensation.



Finish: Short-lived, wormwood and angelica, some anise fades away.



Overall: I do not perceive there that awful bitterness some were complaining about, this is very good, well-balanced absinthe which might benefit from stronger colouration.

Retired Brands
Reviewed by absinthist     August 05, 2008
Last updated: August 05, 2008
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0

I am sitting at Parisian cafe in 1899...

Because I have seen too many complaints as regards the aging or the lack of wormwood in that absinthe I have ever since been very fond of, I felt obliged to re-visit the old fella.

Colour: delicate, slightly yellowish verte just the way it is gotta be.
Louche: at 1:1 there are nice trails and absinthe starts to bloom in the obvious direction, the beautifully-slow-forming pearelscence is rising from the glass and at 1:3 it is neither too thick nor too thin and reminiscent of the finest Pernod fils louche-creaminess. I have finished mine at 1:5 to move wormwoodiness even more to the front, though at 1:3 it is still magnificient.

Aroma: Scent is divine and first of all there is a strong florality coming from wormwood and just a touch of fennel, and almost citrusy accent that helps you to close your eyes and travel back to Paris of 1899

Flavour: Very well balanced, with nothing to be snitty or predominant. Of course, the notorious Pontarlier wormwood is the major player, hence the absinthe is not sweet and wormwood bitterness transforms magically into the honey-like mintiness of the pontica that stays long on the palate and invites to the second sip.

Finish: Thanks Christ, anethole buddies are far away and finish is crisp, spicy and light, very pleasant, long-lingering and not tongue-numbing.

Overall: So far there has never been a better CO and I highly doubt if there ever be.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     July 02, 2008
Last updated: July 02, 2008
Overall rating 
 
2.3
Appearance 
 
2.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
2.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
2.0
Overall 
 
2.0

At the beginning there was hope...

I remember I was astonished when it appeared on the shelves and the very day of its launch I have bought it-note, the price back then was not very inviting; now it is very, very cheap.



Before opening the bottle, one should bear in mind it does present well: nice bottle with a cork, interesting label, even the colour is attractive somehow.



However, poured in a glass the story changes desperately.



The biggest flaw of the product: as long as it quite drinkable, it is artificially-coloured and artificially-flavoured with oils, so there is barely nothing genuine or natural about it. The colour itself is not Hill's/Stromu'esque, more in the vein of "being green" but at just 55% it is too green and could be achieved the natural way.



Since it looks like it has taken inspiration from Spanish absentas, the louche is quick, very fat I would say.



The aroma is fennel mainly (the only natural ingredient I believe) plus a combo of glycerine-based anise oil, some mint, no wormwood whatsoever in the aroma, not even a trace. Smells like cheap pastis with green colouring.



The flavour is flat, predominantly anisy, far too sweet for my tooth, hence 1:4, 1:5 ratio is much recommended so as to prevent it from tongue numbing and cloying.



Finish is quite nice, there is a very tiny wormwood bite that could be enhanced more and some mintiness that helps with finishing the glass.



All in all, although it comes from own country I am not recommending it all, it is artificial, too sweet and resembles bad pastis more than standard absinthe. In comparison with the dreadful and disastrous Apsinthion grande de luxe, it is much, much better and of course easily drinkable, but Poland offers an abundance of quality spirits, so it no use spending money on any Apsinthion.



I simply cannot understand why it is, year by year, given medals at IWSC???

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     May 28, 2008
Last updated: May 28, 2008
Overall rating 
 
2.9
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
1.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0

What a surprise, indeed!

As probably everyone else I was very curious and afraid of trying that absinthe (yeah, absinthe, not absinth) which hails from Czech Republic. And what can I say? I am really astonished. Starting with appearance: the colour is very nice, natural green striving slowly towards feuille morte (see pic.)



Another good aspect of that absinthe is its intriguing, clean aroma, composed of veronica, anise and pontica. The alcohol is very clear and delicate, trying it neat provides no burn we know from poorly-made spirits.



The flavour is very complex, and predominantly veronicae-in one word: this is an ultimate veronica bomb!



However, there are some things in that absinthe that need fixing. First of all, despite the subtle if evident anise presence, the louche is very, very delicate and more water and all the goodness is lost. The best ratio I have found was 1:2, 1:2.5.

Nevertheless, it louches unlike 99% of absinth(e)s made in the Czech Republic.



Secondly, the colour is quite right, but the abundance of colouring herbs (pontica and hyssop especially) should be tweaked so as to let wormwood bloom since wormwood note is very discrete in the concoction and at first sip you might not find it at all, though it is there, right behind pontica, following anethole buddies.



All in all, this is the very first successful attempt at making a genuine absinthe in Czech Republic. Because of it unusual strong veronica profile and unbalancity (maybe little aging prior to bottling will help?) it will not appeal to everyone, but some of absintheurs shall find it enjoyable for sure.

Faux Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     May 14, 2008
Overall rating 
 
1.6
Appearance 
 
1.0
Louche 
 
1.0
Aroma 
 
2.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
1.0
Overall 
 
2.0

Taking into account, they make such a decent slivo

Stromu is better when compared with Hill's. Here I would end that review.



However, let's start from the beginning, colour is more on the greener than on the bluish side, of course it is artificial. There is no louche, although it tries to louche just a bit. Aroma is not that bad, mint, some herbs, the alcohol used by Palirna u zeleneho Stromu is better smelling.



Taken neat it reveals to be strongly bitter note from wormwood stems of very inferior quality, and surprisingly there is some anise detectable. Since it is not louchable, it is drinkable when used as an ingredient of cocktails.



Palirna u zeleneho Stromu is known for a variety of products, their absinth falls out off any category and it would be better if they concentrated more on their slivovitz.

Faux Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     May 14, 2008
Overall rating 
 
1.0
Appearance 
 
1.0
Louche 
 
1.0
Aroma 
 
1.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
1.0
Finish 
 
1.0
Overall 
 
1.0

extra quality spirit, yeah, sure...

The pioneer of absinths. It was the only thing I could get in the 90's. After so many years, I have opened the last bottle I left for decoration (a real vintage, believe me;)



Colour has faded, still artificial. There was no louche and there will never be no matter how much effort you put into louching it. It smell of very poor alcohol and mint bubble gum or something alike.



It is so nasty that I would not call it as having a taste. Everyone despite all myths and hyping should avoid it.



If I were able, I would rate louche, taste and finish at 0.

Absinthe Substitutes
Reviewed by absinthist     May 14, 2008
Overall rating 
 
3.8
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
2.0
Overall 
 
4.0

Young, but so au courant

The version I have had was sans sucre, so in a sense the closest to what should be understood under the term of "anis".



At a moderate strength, pleasant scent, very anisy and when compared with anisettes or ouzo, it stands fast as a very good and reliable product. However, I would be far from calling it an absinthe substitute.



The colour is almost, almost clear, although I perceive very small yellowish tinge. The louche is subtle, unlike in pastis or other anis, it slowly forms and never reaches full opacity, nice to look at. In terms of aroma it is diffult to score high something that contains anise and smells of anise, too one-dimensional.



The taste is very inviting, though the ratio 1:3 is the best to catch all the nuances created by the mixture of anise, alcohol and water. It is crisp, refreshing.



Much as I wasn't so fond of Francois Guy, I am very pleased with the simplicity yet decisiveness of Pontarlier Anis.

Absinthe Substitutes
Reviewed by absinthist     May 14, 2008
Last updated: May 14, 2008
Overall rating 
 
1.6
Appearance 
 
1.0
Louche 
 
2.0
Aroma 
 
1.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
1.0
Overall 
 
2.0

Maybe in 1936 it was something

Contemporary pastis makers who work for big CO enterprises are very often cutting corners and commit 7 modern Pastis' sins:



1.low quality alcohol is used, usually it is beet;

2.natural or artificial oils are used which only suggest what should explode with finesse;

3. it is either sugared or oversugared;

4.too many ingredients are used

5. hardly any balance is found

6. maceration is short or simply omitted

7. very blunt dull taste

Apart from point no. 4, Ricard which should be a benchmark of Pastis de Marseille the real McCoy scores them all.



The current version of it (we can pray that 1936 version was much better) is terrible: star anise oil, inferior alcohol base, loads of sugar. If you are able to detect any herbal nuances in that pastis, like pontica or mugwort, you were lucky, I wasn't.



If I am to sip pastis, I simply go for Prado which although much cheaper, is surprisingly much better.

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     May 14, 2008
Last updated: March 02, 2009
Overall rating 
 
3.9
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
1.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
4.0

c'est l'heure, but the clockmaster needs a lesson

The review of Belle Amie 2:

Have just finished the tasting of the new Belle Amie. First of all, apart from that cork issue, there is another problem both I and my Mum concluded that aroma is very, very alcoholic, it smells like moonshine at 82%, not an elegant absinthe at just 72%.

However, from the beginning:

The colour-not bad but not as beautiful as previously. Louche has been enhanced, possibly with badiane as I am detecting its characteristical note but for the style it is still very nice, slowly forming, gradual, getting denser and denser, drop by drop.

Water is the solution to the harsh aroma (surprisingly the first edition had had a much better aroma) and the bad wine alcohol-the crappiest of allbase gets lost in the herbs’ symphony.

And here I have to admit these are top-notch ones, very bold, strong, bitter, decisive wormwood (much less discrete than in the previous offering), nice pontica, hyssop, balanced coriander and pleasant elacampane.
Finish is long lingering, complex and just as the style requires.

You want the perfect Belle Amie?-take its herb-bill from the second offering, badiane can stay-it is not that obtrusive and it helps absinthe louche well without the risk of being over-watered. Take the base of the first, or do as the wise people do and use grain alcohol. The absinthe should be perfumey not stinky!

Once all this is made, the perfect Belle Amie is accomplished


The review of Belle Amie 1

Gently open the bottle, or unscrew the sample, whatever you have at hand:) and inhale the scent of Arcadia, it is really what the guys back in the heyday might have sipped.

Colour which is a perfect feuille morte, achieved thanks to recommended aging and only natural botanicals, of which veronica seems to be very prominent invites you to partake in the spirit of Belle Epoque. (5)

The louche is slowly forming and typical of de Nimes style so that you just have to sit back and relax while watching the mesmerizing oil trails which finish up being not too thin not to thick a glass of pearl opalescence with a nice, very tiny green tinge. 1:4 ratio seems to be enough. (4)

Once louched, the aromes or angelica, elecampane root and wormwood are filling the room and taking the first sip from the glass leaves a bold, decisive and strongly herbaceous sensation, anethole buddies are not the main players here and stay at the back, if could have their say that very moment. (4) (5)

The finish is sublime with long lingering coriander note that hurries the wormwoodiness. Here, wormwood needs little enhancement. (4)

Of all the absinthes that have been released in the recent time, that shall be considered the real extrait d'absinthe on par with Bazinet or Pernod, if not better. Chapeaux bas! (4)

Traditional Absinthe
Reviewed by absinthist     May 14, 2008
Last updated: May 14, 2008
Overall rating 
 
2.1
Appearance 
 
1.0
Louche 
 
1.0
Aroma 
 
1.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
3.0

I have had better horses...

Although I have not had the first edition of 1797, I have been told these two are like heaven and earth and so they are. However, if I am to score that absinthe as it is, I must point out certain flaws it definitely possesses.

The colour of the sample I was given is so pale, that it is difficult to call it even jaune. Nevertheless, it is natural and not that neon-like which we can come across nowadays.

Using a frozen water method of preparation, it had to louche somehow and so it has, unfortunately whereas it could strive more towards some green nuances it went Payne's grey, not even white.

At that point, we might assume faint colour and louche are the most discernible errors that have been made with this absinthe. Nonetheless, there is the 3rd culprit which made me feel uneasy-the aroma, neat: it is a tragedy, uninviting, very pungent and what is worse, it does smell of neither anise nor wormwood.

However, that changes completely when water is added, the aroma transforms beutifully into a nice combination of anethole buddies and very pleasant spiciness, that very moment the absinthe gets rescued from being critized further.

Its flavour, if not that much complex, is quite inviting and traditional, wormwood could be more pronounced, though.

The finish is probably the best, very silently the orchestra of wormwood, pontica and mint are rising to evolve into one note and fade into the aforementioned spiciness.

All in all, that absinthe is interesting but due to some lacks might not be preferred over other brands that are currently on the market.

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