Lucid - Absinthe Superieure http://www.wormwoodsociety.org/media/reviews/photos/thumbnail/300x300s/4f/df/bc/191_lucid_absinthe_bottle.V20889830_1185571019.jpg

 
3.4 (4)
 
3.3 (25)
 

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Year of Make (if known)
Country of Origin
Distiller/Manufacturer


Editor reviews

Average editor rating from: 4 user(s)

Overall rating 
 
3.4
Appearance 
 
3.5  (4)
Louche 
 
3.5  (4)
Aroma 
 
3.3  (4)
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.5  (4)
Finish 
 
3.3  (4)
Overall 
 
3.3  (4)

Color
Quite pale olive oil green. Natural looking, but not riveting in any way.

Louche
Good oily looking trails at first while cloudiness builds from the bottom. They quickly turn from trails to big rolling explosions. Nice to watch. Cloudiness builds pretty quickly, and the drink is mostly opaque by a little over 1:1. Final color is a light greenish yellow, white highlights, and greenish white meniscus. Nothing wrong with this color, just nothing particularly arresting, either. Kind of flat.

Aroma
Pre-louche, anise and some wormwood and a lot of alcohol. Louched, primarily wormwood with good support from the anise and fennel. Aromas are fairly faint, not very assertive. Nonetheless, all the expected components are present and in good balance. Still nicely herbal, with a little florality and spice. In the second evaluation, I detected a slight "stewed vegetable" funk.

Flavor
Certainly proper absinthe. Wormwood, anise, and fennel are all in quite nice balance. Not a powerhouse of flavor, but nicely correct. A little excessive heat on the palate. As with aroma, all facets of palate are in good balance. The "funk" in the aroma does not carry over to the palate. Both flavors and aromas improve noticeably with air and increased temperature.

Finish
Nice gentle drying and astringency on the finish followed by a little burst of spice and some heat. The finish accurately wraps up what the nose and palate portend. There's a little prickliness in the tongue from the alcohol, a little more water may help, but I'm concerned about really diminishing the aromas and flavors.

Overall
This would be a fine intro to absinthe for anyone. Everything is correct, nothing overdone. Not distinctive, but I'm sure the producer went to good lengths to make sure they would have dead consistency in this product. It almost seems to be designed to not offend anyone, and there's always a sacrifice when one plays not to loose... diminished personality, distinctiveness, and excitement. On the other hand, someone needs to make that centerline product that defines the category. This may be it.

7/06/09 Revisit - All original scores and text is unaltered. New observations are that the "funk" to which I refer in the original review, I'm sure, is the beet alcohol base showing itself from time to time. Also, more water didn't hurt it at all. This offering, in my opinion, is exactly as I titled it... "Centerline". Knowing what I know now, I think it is remarkable that Mr. Breaux can make so much of this and have it in such wide distribution as he does, and maintain this quality level. Many others do not. This was my 4th review on WS. With another eight months and 30 CO's of absinthe study under my belt, my current opinion is that it is one to get to know, after which it is easier to understand "for better or for worse". And believe me, you could do a lot worse. A LOT worse.

Done with a 1 ounce dose, diluted 3:1, 4:1, and no sugar.

Lucid 11/08/08, 11/12/08, 7/06/09.
All evaluations had consistent notes.
Overall rating 
 
3.2
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0
Reviewed by Michael Meyers November 17, 2008
Last updated: September 12, 2012
Top 10 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (53)

Solid Centerline Verte

Color
Quite pale olive oil green. Natural looking, but not riveting in any way.

Louche
Good oily looking trails at first while cloudiness builds from the bottom. They quickly turn from trails to big rolling explosions. Nice to watch. Cloudiness builds pretty quickly, and the drink is mostly opaque by a little over 1:1. Final color is a light greenish yellow, white highlights, and greenish white meniscus. Nothing wrong with this color, just nothing particularly arresting, either. Kind of flat.

Aroma
Pre-louche, anise and some wormwood and a lot of alcohol. Louched, primarily wormwood with good support from the anise and fennel. Aromas are fairly faint, not very assertive. Nonetheless, all the expected components are present and in good balance. Still nicely herbal, with a little florality and spice. In the second evaluation, I detected a slight "stewed vegetable" funk.

Flavor
Certainly proper absinthe. Wormwood, anise, and fennel are all in quite nice balance. Not a powerhouse of flavor, but nicely correct. A little excessive heat on the palate. As with aroma, all facets of palate are in good balance. The "funk" in the aroma does not carry over to the palate. Both flavors and aromas improve noticeably with air and increased temperature.

Finish
Nice gentle drying and astringency on the finish followed by a little burst of spice and some heat. The finish accurately wraps up what the nose and palate portend. There's a little prickliness in the tongue from the alcohol, a little more water may help, but I'm concerned about really diminishing the aromas and flavors.

Overall
This would be a fine intro to absinthe for anyone. Everything is correct, nothing overdone. Not distinctive, but I'm sure the producer went to good lengths to make sure they would have dead consistency in this product. It almost seems to be designed to not offend anyone, and there's always a sacrifice when one plays not to loose... diminished personality, distinctiveness, and excitement. On the other hand, someone needs to make that centerline product that defines the category. This may be it.

7/06/09 Revisit - All original scores and text is unaltered. New observations are that the "funk" to which I refer in the original review, I'm sure, is the beet alcohol base showing itself from time to time. Also, more water didn't hurt it at all. This offering, in my opinion, is exactly as I titled it... "Centerline". Knowing what I know now, I think it is remarkable that Mr. Breaux can make so much of this and have it in such wide distribution as he does, and maintain this quality level. Many others do not. This was my 4th review on WS. With another eight months and 30 CO's of absinthe study under my belt, my current opinion is that it is one to get to know, after which it is easier to understand "for better or for worse". And believe me, you could do a lot worse. A LOT worse.

Done with a 1 ounce dose, diluted 3:1, 4:1, and no sugar.

Lucid 11/08/08, 11/12/08, 7/06/09.
All evaluations had consistent notes.

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A wonderful first absinthe for America! Call it "Jade Lite" but it is a smooth and absolutely drinkable absinthe. Sure it's not as complex as the Daddy Jades but it doesn't pack the hefty price, either. I especially like the sustained flavor long after the drink has been swallowed of wormwood and a warm spiciness.



Consider the price and factor in the delivery charge if it was shipped from Europe and you have to give Lucid credit as excellent bang-for-your-buck. Besides the price, it's an excellent everyday absinthe.
Overall rating 
 
3.7
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0
Reviewed by Joe Legate September 28, 2007
Last updated: September 28, 2007
Top 100 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (26)

Simple, clean and tasty

A wonderful first absinthe for America! Call it "Jade Lite" but it is a smooth and absolutely drinkable absinthe. Sure it's not as complex as the Daddy Jades but it doesn't pack the hefty price, either. I especially like the sustained flavor long after the drink has been swallowed of wormwood and a warm spiciness.



Consider the price and factor in the delivery charge if it was shipped from Europe and you have to give Lucid credit as excellent bang-for-your-buck. Besides the price, it's an excellent everyday absinthe.

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05/29/11 Revisit

The colour has improved to a bright gold with a hint of green. There is a very slight haziness but it is otherwise quite attractive. The aroma is anise-forward, with some caramel and notes of green apple.

The louche is also improved. Almost white with a hint of greenish blue. Nice lightplay. After water the wormwood comes forward some. There's a dose of funky cumin. The unwanted caramel aroma is still there but has backed off a bit.

The flavour is dominated by very sweet, strong anise, but unfortunately the second most dominant flavour is the annoying funk. The wormwood lays back some. The caramel taste thankfully isn't anywhere near as strong as it used to be, which has a huge impact on the perception of freshness. There's a slight tartness and some spicy notes. The finish is a wall of numbing anise and not terribly complex.

It's definitely improved. There are still some crippling flaws but it has gone from being nearly undrinkable to a decent, middle-shelf absinthe.

Original review:

Lucid pours a pale, clear, natural olive. The louche is everywhere at once and lacking theatrics, but it does have good definition and refraction as it turns a pale yellow-green. The light aroma is of mostly anise and wormwood but also seems caramelized. All of these characteristics carry over into the simple, flat flavour. There are no noticeable notes of colouring herbs. Another flaw is a funky, sweaty taste but it's not dominating. However, I find the caramelly flavour over the top and highly distracting. The mouth-feel is fairly creamy and not too numbing. The finish is wormwood that seems to transform into fennel as it lingers. Lucid just doesn't taste like I expect absinthe to. It's got the basic, required components but they don't add up right.
Overall rating 
 
3.3
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0
Reviewed by Andrew Young July 27, 2007
Last updated: May 29, 2011
Top 10 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (60)

The first absinthe to hit US shelves since the ban

05/29/11 Revisit

The colour has improved to a bright gold with a hint of green. There is a very slight haziness but it is otherwise quite attractive. The aroma is anise-forward, with some caramel and notes of green apple.

The louche is also improved. Almost white with a hint of greenish blue. Nice lightplay. After water the wormwood comes forward some. There's a dose of funky cumin. The unwanted caramel aroma is still there but has backed off a bit.

The flavour is dominated by very sweet, strong anise, but unfortunately the second most dominant flavour is the annoying funk. The wormwood lays back some. The caramel taste thankfully isn't anywhere near as strong as it used to be, which has a huge impact on the perception of freshness. There's a slight tartness and some spicy notes. The finish is a wall of numbing anise and not terribly complex.

It's definitely improved. There are still some crippling flaws but it has gone from being nearly undrinkable to a decent, middle-shelf absinthe.

Original review:

Lucid pours a pale, clear, natural olive. The louche is everywhere at once and lacking theatrics, but it does have good definition and refraction as it turns a pale yellow-green. The light aroma is of mostly anise and wormwood but also seems caramelized. All of these characteristics carry over into the simple, flat flavour. There are no noticeable notes of colouring herbs. Another flaw is a funky, sweaty taste but it's not dominating. However, I find the caramelly flavour over the top and highly distracting. The mouth-feel is fairly creamy and not too numbing. The finish is wormwood that seems to transform into fennel as it lingers. Lucid just doesn't taste like I expect absinthe to. It's got the basic, required components but they don't add up right.

Was this review helpful to you? 
ORIGINAL REVIEW FROM 7/27/07: Tagged even by Ted Breaux as a 'Jade light', this is the first authentic absinthe to be released for purchase within the U.S. since the early 1900's.

The color isn't as bright as the Jades, but very natural and pleasant. There's just a hint of murkiness.

The louche starts with wonderful oil trails and builds slowly from the bottom to the top, with a clear delineation of green and milky white.

The aroma is spicy and herbal with nice amounts of anise and fennel. Quite powerful. The use of beet spirit instead of grape spirit is noticable, but not off-putting.

Upon tasting, I didn't expect as much anise as I got. Given his notes that he had reduced the amount of anise to comply with American tastes, I was taken by surprise. The balance of anise and fennel and wormwood is much better than I anticipated. It also leaves nice legs on the glass when drinking or swirling.

The finish has a hint of the same spiciness that I taste with the PF 1914 vintage. Almost peppery. When asked about this at the Tales of the Cocktail 2007, he attributed this to the use of commercially available herbs, which have different qualities and tastes than the small scale harvesting of herbs that he uses for the Jades.



Overall, this is a great introduction of absinthe to the US. It's an absinthe that doesn't overpower the novice, and will leave them wanting to try more. A success as a door opener. OVERALL REVIEW: 3.8



UPDATED REVIEW 9-13-08:

Most of my opinions above still are valid, but with the recent influx of high quality absinthe into the US market, the original scores just couldn't hold up to the competition. It's still a great introduction to absinthe newcomers, but it's a mid-range absinthe. Made th right way, with the qualities one looks for in authentic brands, just not a blockbuster.
Overall rating 
 
3.3
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0
Reviewed by Brian Robinson July 27, 2007
Last updated: September 13, 2008
#1 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (167)

A very nice introduction for the US market

ORIGINAL REVIEW FROM 7/27/07: Tagged even by Ted Breaux as a 'Jade light', this is the first authentic absinthe to be released for purchase within the U.S. since the early 1900's.

The color isn't as bright as the Jades, but very natural and pleasant. There's just a hint of murkiness.

The louche starts with wonderful oil trails and builds slowly from the bottom to the top, with a clear delineation of green and milky white.

The aroma is spicy and herbal with nice amounts of anise and fennel. Quite powerful. The use of beet spirit instead of grape spirit is noticable, but not off-putting.

Upon tasting, I didn't expect as much anise as I got. Given his notes that he had reduced the amount of anise to comply with American tastes, I was taken by surprise. The balance of anise and fennel and wormwood is much better than I anticipated. It also leaves nice legs on the glass when drinking or swirling.

The finish has a hint of the same spiciness that I taste with the PF 1914 vintage. Almost peppery. When asked about this at the Tales of the Cocktail 2007, he attributed this to the use of commercially available herbs, which have different qualities and tastes than the small scale harvesting of herbs that he uses for the Jades.



Overall, this is a great introduction of absinthe to the US. It's an absinthe that doesn't overpower the novice, and will leave them wanting to try more. A success as a door opener. OVERALL REVIEW: 3.8



UPDATED REVIEW 9-13-08:

Most of my opinions above still are valid, but with the recent influx of high quality absinthe into the US market, the original scores just couldn't hold up to the competition. It's still a great introduction to absinthe newcomers, but it's a mid-range absinthe. Made th right way, with the qualities one looks for in authentic brands, just not a blockbuster.

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Overall rating 
 
3.3
Appearance 
 
3.2  (25)
Louche 
 
3.6  (25)
Aroma 
 
3.2  (25)
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.4  (25)
Finish 
 
3.2  (25)
Overall 
 
3.2  (25)
UPDATED 06/25/2014:

I was buying some wine this week (and always check the absinthes) and noticed the Lucid bottles they had in stock looked odd. It was selling for a fairly cheap price so grabbed a bottle. It is indeed a new bottle design!

How can you tell?
+ Much taller - Lucid is now the one absinthe that does not fit in my cabinet (it used to).
+ Squarer shoulders - no longer as rounded at the top... had a sharper, squarer edge.
+ No more "dimple" at the bottom of the bottle.
+ Labeling seems the same otherwise.

I had to sample it as well. It is nearly the same as I remember BUT doesn't have that "funk/beet" taste which in the past turned me off so much. I am very pleased with that! [probably has nothing whatsoever to do with the bottle shape, of course]

I have shifted most of my original scores up a bit in consideration of this. There must have been something off about the previous bottling as this is a clean, crisp spirit which doesn't exhibit any of the peculiarities noted in my original review. It is quite tasty!

A well-made absinthe that is available just about everywhere. Not a bad situation we have here.


ORIGINAL REVIEW:

Appearance: The color is a light green/yellowish as most other absinthes I've seen. Nothing remarkable but nothing offensive either :)

Louche: I like how this one louches. It sort of builds from bottom to top and retains a thin layer of unlouched absinthe until about nearly prepared. The louche itself is nice and thick - which tends to be my preference.

Aroma: Definitely smells like absinthe - but for the underlying beet scents. I find them to be distracting of the other aromas and that's really too bad. This is definitely the weak point in this absinthe! I enjoy some other absinthes that just blossom with aroma and wash over you... not this one though.

Flavor: Nice, usual, and as expected. Little bit of numbing and warmth - which is nice.

Mouthfeel: Has an okay creaminess to it as I would expect from the louche - though I'm too inexperienced to know whether these two qualities go hand-in-hand.

Finish: Nothing particularly striking.

Overall: I'm going to let this age a bit and see whether that underlying scent goes away. I have a bottle of Kubler which is a few months old and where at first it had an odd sort of "funk" to the scent... after hanging around in my absinthe cupboard it no longer does. Let's do a little experiment with Lucid :)

Definitely not the poor product some make it out to be - but I have (in my limited experience) had much better for the same price.
Overall rating 
 
3.4
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.5
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.5
Reviewed by josephlabrecque January 17, 2013
Last updated: June 25, 2014
Top 50 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (27)

Finally tried Lucid

UPDATED 06/25/2014:

I was buying some wine this week (and always check the absinthes) and noticed the Lucid bottles they had in stock looked odd. It was selling for a fairly cheap price so grabbed a bottle. It is indeed a new bottle design!

How can you tell?
+ Much taller - Lucid is now the one absinthe that does not fit in my cabinet (it used to).
+ Squarer shoulders - no longer as rounded at the top... had a sharper, squarer edge.
+ No more "dimple" at the bottom of the bottle.
+ Labeling seems the same otherwise.

I had to sample it as well. It is nearly the same as I remember BUT doesn't have that "funk/beet" taste which in the past turned me off so much. I am very pleased with that! [probably has nothing whatsoever to do with the bottle shape, of course]

I have shifted most of my original scores up a bit in consideration of this. There must have been something off about the previous bottling as this is a clean, crisp spirit which doesn't exhibit any of the peculiarities noted in my original review. It is quite tasty!

A well-made absinthe that is available just about everywhere. Not a bad situation we have here.


ORIGINAL REVIEW:

Appearance: The color is a light green/yellowish as most other absinthes I've seen. Nothing remarkable but nothing offensive either :)

Louche: I like how this one louches. It sort of builds from bottom to top and retains a thin layer of unlouched absinthe until about nearly prepared. The louche itself is nice and thick - which tends to be my preference.

Aroma: Definitely smells like absinthe - but for the underlying beet scents. I find them to be distracting of the other aromas and that's really too bad. This is definitely the weak point in this absinthe! I enjoy some other absinthes that just blossom with aroma and wash over you... not this one though.

Flavor: Nice, usual, and as expected. Little bit of numbing and warmth - which is nice.

Mouthfeel: Has an okay creaminess to it as I would expect from the louche - though I'm too inexperienced to know whether these two qualities go hand-in-hand.

Finish: Nothing particularly striking.

Overall: I'm going to let this age a bit and see whether that underlying scent goes away. I have a bottle of Kubler which is a few months old and where at first it had an odd sort of "funk" to the scent... after hanging around in my absinthe cupboard it no longer does. Let's do a little experiment with Lucid :)

Definitely not the poor product some make it out to be - but I have (in my limited experience) had much better for the same price.

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Appearance: The color is light. Really, really light. Clearly natural, and not cloudy, but there's a lot more that could be going on here.

Louche: Develops a nice louche, but ends up pretty thick. It does maintain a nice color.

Aroma: Ever so slight muskiness, but the aroma is fairly pleasant, reminiscent of the more "dessert-like" absinthes, with noticeable anise and melissa.

Flavor: Very sweet and full of anise, but not at all unpleasant. Tongue-numbing, but not a lot of complexity.

Finish: The finish has the mouth-watering sensation I would typically attribute to wormwood, but there isn't much wormwood flavor to be found...this sensation is decently lengthy.

Overall: I know it's pretty much the cool thing nowadays to make fun of this absinthe, especially among experienced absintheurs, but Lucid is honestly not bad. I grow a little tired of people going "I tried Lucid and it was so completely horrible, but I got a bottle of better absinthe and I'm happy now", which tends to read the same as most Czech-sinthe experiences...I don't find it to be at all like that. This was the first absinthe I ever tried, and I honestly breathed a sigh of relief that I found myself enjoying Lucid and would be willing to purchase more absinthe in the future, because initially I was worried I wouldn't like absinthe at all. I do feel that for the price, there are a number of much better absinthes on the market, but if I didn't have access to these other absinthes, I would still drink Lucid.
Overall rating 
 
3.2
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0
Reviewed by Amber Peter May 05, 2012
Last updated: May 05, 2012
Top 10 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (58)

My first absinthe

Appearance: The color is light. Really, really light. Clearly natural, and not cloudy, but there's a lot more that could be going on here.

Louche: Develops a nice louche, but ends up pretty thick. It does maintain a nice color.

Aroma: Ever so slight muskiness, but the aroma is fairly pleasant, reminiscent of the more "dessert-like" absinthes, with noticeable anise and melissa.

Flavor: Very sweet and full of anise, but not at all unpleasant. Tongue-numbing, but not a lot of complexity.

Finish: The finish has the mouth-watering sensation I would typically attribute to wormwood, but there isn't much wormwood flavor to be found...this sensation is decently lengthy.

Overall: I know it's pretty much the cool thing nowadays to make fun of this absinthe, especially among experienced absintheurs, but Lucid is honestly not bad. I grow a little tired of people going "I tried Lucid and it was so completely horrible, but I got a bottle of better absinthe and I'm happy now", which tends to read the same as most Czech-sinthe experiences...I don't find it to be at all like that. This was the first absinthe I ever tried, and I honestly breathed a sigh of relief that I found myself enjoying Lucid and would be willing to purchase more absinthe in the future, because initially I was worried I wouldn't like absinthe at all. I do feel that for the price, there are a number of much better absinthes on the market, but if I didn't have access to these other absinthes, I would still drink Lucid.

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Appearance: Pale yellow that looks like an off color blanche. Natural though.

Louche: Nice oil trails with a smooth gradient. When finished it is a very thick louche. The color is nice and the formulation is good.

Aroma: Good anise forward smell. Not much wormwood and not much balance. No odd or exceptional aromas.

Flavor: Simple and like the smell this is very anise forward with maybe some lemon balm easily detectable as well. A very sweet absinthe on by itself, maybe overly so. It is smooth though. Nothing here that I would shun but nothing remarkable either.

Finish: The finish maintains the flavor for a decent amount of time but it doesn't do much else.

Overall: It is almost as if the producers were aiming for average. This is nothing that would go into my rotation but it is a very acceptable gatekeeper to the world of real absinthe. My only concern in marketing this towards newcomers is the pricepoint now that much stiffer competition is available for the same price. This is decent stuff but it is not really worth the pricetag that it is currently at.
Overall rating 
 
3.0
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0
Reviewed by Evan Camomile April 12, 2012
Top 10 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (69)

A good start.

Appearance: Pale yellow that looks like an off color blanche. Natural though.

Louche: Nice oil trails with a smooth gradient. When finished it is a very thick louche. The color is nice and the formulation is good.

Aroma: Good anise forward smell. Not much wormwood and not much balance. No odd or exceptional aromas.

Flavor: Simple and like the smell this is very anise forward with maybe some lemon balm easily detectable as well. A very sweet absinthe on by itself, maybe overly so. It is smooth though. Nothing here that I would shun but nothing remarkable either.

Finish: The finish maintains the flavor for a decent amount of time but it doesn't do much else.

Overall: It is almost as if the producers were aiming for average. This is nothing that would go into my rotation but it is a very acceptable gatekeeper to the world of real absinthe. My only concern in marketing this towards newcomers is the pricepoint now that much stiffer competition is available for the same price. This is decent stuff but it is not really worth the pricetag that it is currently at.

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Lucid absinthe was one of the first absinthes I saw on the shelf when the ban was lifted in the U.S. but for some reason I waited a long time to try it. We ended up buying a bottle when it was the best option at a local liquor store. The reviews were not great, so I wasn't expecting much but I thought it was a great absinthe! The color was a little dull, but the louche was beautiful and you could see each drop dance into the glass. The bottle is dark, I assume to block sun light but I think it could have done a better job as the appearance was underwhelming. The aroma is sweet, and strong. The flavor just about matches the aroma having a strong anise and fennel flavor, without the rewarding wormwood kick which is what stopped it from getting a 4 on flavor. Definitely a great absinthe, that is so close to being amazing!
Overall rating 
 
3.8
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.5
Finish 
 
3.5
Overall 
 
3.5
Reviewed by discosheets April 06, 2012
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (5)

Not bad!

Lucid absinthe was one of the first absinthes I saw on the shelf when the ban was lifted in the U.S. but for some reason I waited a long time to try it. We ended up buying a bottle when it was the best option at a local liquor store. The reviews were not great, so I wasn't expecting much but I thought it was a great absinthe! The color was a little dull, but the louche was beautiful and you could see each drop dance into the glass. The bottle is dark, I assume to block sun light but I think it could have done a better job as the appearance was underwhelming. The aroma is sweet, and strong. The flavor just about matches the aroma having a strong anise and fennel flavor, without the rewarding wormwood kick which is what stopped it from getting a 4 on flavor. Definitely a great absinthe, that is so close to being amazing!

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Color: A mostly yellow-yellow-green, clear liquid. I see some opalescence after the louche; the finished glass of Lucid is mostly white with some blue and green highlights. It's acceptable.

Louche: Glass brouilleur was placed over my classic Pontarlier absinthe glass, which has a nice glass bubble on the bottom to hold and measure the correct amount of absinthe. Sugar cube was put into brouilleur and filtered ice water was poured in. A small stream of iced water poured into the Lucid through the brouilleur. (I can control the drip of the brouilleur by placing it flush over the top of he glass to create a tight seal. The water won't drip then. I slowly slide the brouilleur to open the seal to control the flow, from drip to slow stream.) This time I simply went with the slow stream all the way. Surprisingly, the louche took its time finishing. Nice oily trails appeared through the lower "bubble" in the Pontarlier glass, for what seemed a goodly time providing a nice show ... before turning into some lovely swirling white clouds, which went on for longer than usual before finally turning to an opaque, mostly white drink with very slight blue and green highlights.

Aroma: Strong anise and fennel aroma that is slightly peppery. Not very complex, but not bad.

Flavor: Again, strong anise and fennel taste, slightly peppery. Wormwood clearly numbs the tongue, so it's present. The "trinity" is there — it's a real absinthe — but I can't tell what are the other herbs. Not very complex is the main thing. Problem? Aftertaste is quite poor, perhaps due to the beet-based alcohol. Mouth ends up quite numb with not the most pleasant taste.

Finish: I'm through with the first glass and waiting for the second. Aftertaste of the first is a bit unpleasant and now I'm considering the elixir quality. So far it's mediocre. However, my mouth is numb; in that way, the slightly unpleasant background taste is thankfully minimized.

Minutes later ... OK, I've had most of the second glass. Again, it's a real absinthe, the "trinity" is there, my impression is slightly "complex," better than after just one. Still, the low quality of the beet-alcohol base is too evident. Why use beets and charge this price? There are plenty of wine- or brandy-based spirits in France, this country of elite alcohols, aren't there?

Overall: Again, it's a real absinthe. Lucid leaves you with not the most complex or pleasant taste, but a slightly complex "impression." It's very average, not the type of thing I would want to have at a sunny café late in the day, but rather something desired in a blues bar late at night while wearing dark glasses, if it was on "special." It is quite overpriced: I paid more than $80 including tax at a local liquor store in New Jersey for it. At this price range, I would certainly consider other absinthe "vertes," such as the Duplais Verte or the Pacifique Verte, a Swiss and an American brand respectively. They are far superior choices. Lucid's louche is nice, yes, but the beet-based alcohol has been cited as the main issue here concerning poor aftertaste, and it might be. Still, I'd cite the lack of excitement concerning the herbal ingredients as the main determining factor in giving this an average to slightly below average score. Also, the bottle with two light green eyes on a dark green bottle — the "green lady," is it? — with the word Lucid in dripping green, it's all a bit purposefully creepy. It makes what's in the bottle seem sinister. The half-empty bottle is going to the back of my liquor cabinet, a souvenir of the first offering of a real absinthe in the USA in a very long time.

Update May 20, 2010: This is often the best choice in liquor stores in New Jersey, as it beats out Pernod and all of the hyped Czech brands. New Jersey liquor stores have yet to catch up and it seems very, very few carry the superior brands, such as Pacifique, Walton Waters, Absinthe Duplais Verte (or Blanche!), La Clandestine, et al. But Lucid is usually stocked — So far, it's invariably the best thing on the shelves here, and it's a reasonable choice.

Update May 23, 2010: If it's Lucid or Pernod, then get the Pernod. Both are subpar when compared with Pacifique, Walton Waters — the "boutigue" brands — but he Pernod was just better for me for taste, aftertaste, and secondary effect. The Pernod's liquor base is also "cleaner" IMO. Still, these are very average brands, and I recommend St. George, Absinthe Duplais varieties and La Clandestine (as a blanche) as more better choices. All are far superior to Lucid or the current Pernod offering.
Overall rating 
 
2.7
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
2.0
Overall 
 
2.0
Reviewed by Anstis LaPointe April 07, 2010
Last updated: May 23, 2010
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (8)

Nice louche, but. ...

Color: A mostly yellow-yellow-green, clear liquid. I see some opalescence after the louche; the finished glass of Lucid is mostly white with some blue and green highlights. It's acceptable.

Louche: Glass brouilleur was placed over my classic Pontarlier absinthe glass, which has a nice glass bubble on the bottom to hold and measure the correct amount of absinthe. Sugar cube was put into brouilleur and filtered ice water was poured in. A small stream of iced water poured into the Lucid through the brouilleur. (I can control the drip of the brouilleur by placing it flush over the top of he glass to create a tight seal. The water won't drip then. I slowly slide the brouilleur to open the seal to control the flow, from drip to slow stream.) This time I simply went with the slow stream all the way. Surprisingly, the louche took its time finishing. Nice oily trails appeared through the lower "bubble" in the Pontarlier glass, for what seemed a goodly time providing a nice show ... before turning into some lovely swirling white clouds, which went on for longer than usual before finally turning to an opaque, mostly white drink with very slight blue and green highlights.

Aroma: Strong anise and fennel aroma that is slightly peppery. Not very complex, but not bad.

Flavor: Again, strong anise and fennel taste, slightly peppery. Wormwood clearly numbs the tongue, so it's present. The "trinity" is there — it's a real absinthe — but I can't tell what are the other herbs. Not very complex is the main thing. Problem? Aftertaste is quite poor, perhaps due to the beet-based alcohol. Mouth ends up quite numb with not the most pleasant taste.

Finish: I'm through with the first glass and waiting for the second. Aftertaste of the first is a bit unpleasant and now I'm considering the elixir quality. So far it's mediocre. However, my mouth is numb; in that way, the slightly unpleasant background taste is thankfully minimized.

Minutes later ... OK, I've had most of the second glass. Again, it's a real absinthe, the "trinity" is there, my impression is slightly "complex," better than after just one. Still, the low quality of the beet-alcohol base is too evident. Why use beets and charge this price? There are plenty of wine- or brandy-based spirits in France, this country of elite alcohols, aren't there?

Overall: Again, it's a real absinthe. Lucid leaves you with not the most complex or pleasant taste, but a slightly complex "impression." It's very average, not the type of thing I would want to have at a sunny café late in the day, but rather something desired in a blues bar late at night while wearing dark glasses, if it was on "special." It is quite overpriced: I paid more than $80 including tax at a local liquor store in New Jersey for it. At this price range, I would certainly consider other absinthe "vertes," such as the Duplais Verte or the Pacifique Verte, a Swiss and an American brand respectively. They are far superior choices. Lucid's louche is nice, yes, but the beet-based alcohol has been cited as the main issue here concerning poor aftertaste, and it might be. Still, I'd cite the lack of excitement concerning the herbal ingredients as the main determining factor in giving this an average to slightly below average score. Also, the bottle with two light green eyes on a dark green bottle — the "green lady," is it? — with the word Lucid in dripping green, it's all a bit purposefully creepy. It makes what's in the bottle seem sinister. The half-empty bottle is going to the back of my liquor cabinet, a souvenir of the first offering of a real absinthe in the USA in a very long time.

Update May 20, 2010: This is often the best choice in liquor stores in New Jersey, as it beats out Pernod and all of the hyped Czech brands. New Jersey liquor stores have yet to catch up and it seems very, very few carry the superior brands, such as Pacifique, Walton Waters, Absinthe Duplais Verte (or Blanche!), La Clandestine, et al. But Lucid is usually stocked — So far, it's invariably the best thing on the shelves here, and it's a reasonable choice.

Update May 23, 2010: If it's Lucid or Pernod, then get the Pernod. Both are subpar when compared with Pacifique, Walton Waters — the "boutigue" brands — but he Pernod was just better for me for taste, aftertaste, and secondary effect. The Pernod's liquor base is also "cleaner" IMO. Still, these are very average brands, and I recommend St. George, Absinthe Duplais varieties and La Clandestine (as a blanche) as more better choices. All are far superior to Lucid or the current Pernod offering.

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Color was a nice light peridot, not quite as clear as it could have been, but it looked natural.

Louche was appropriate, and detailed. Nice trails and clouds that built up from the bottom with a nice layer above.

Aroma was anise and fennel for the most part, with a mild spice.

Flavor was a balance of anise, fennel and wormwood. I found none of the "funk" a few have mentioned.

The finish was clean and crisp, lingered well. Not as 3-D as the best out there, but again, you could do a lot worse.

I was expecting this entry level absinthe to be mediocre, but it was pretty good!
In fact, I'd suggest this to someone who wanted to try absinthe to see if they like the general vibe, letting them know there are better absinthes to be had...but for the $60 kit which includes 2 glasses and a spoon, it's a good starter for someone to test the waters. I think it would lead one to purchases of higher end absinthes.
Overall rating 
 
3.4
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0
Reviewed by Scott M. March 31, 2010
Last updated: May 22, 2012
Top 50 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (64)

Great Intro To The World of Absinthe

Color was a nice light peridot, not quite as clear as it could have been, but it looked natural.

Louche was appropriate, and detailed. Nice trails and clouds that built up from the bottom with a nice layer above.

Aroma was anise and fennel for the most part, with a mild spice.

Flavor was a balance of anise, fennel and wormwood. I found none of the "funk" a few have mentioned.

The finish was clean and crisp, lingered well. Not as 3-D as the best out there, but again, you could do a lot worse.

I was expecting this entry level absinthe to be mediocre, but it was pretty good!
In fact, I'd suggest this to someone who wanted to try absinthe to see if they like the general vibe, letting them know there are better absinthes to be had...but for the $60 kit which includes 2 glasses and a spoon, it's a good starter for someone to test the waters. I think it would lead one to purchases of higher end absinthes.

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Color- Thin green. A little bit hazy as well. No sediment and it’s leaning towards a nice peridot.

Louche- It takes a while to develop and is a welcome change from some ‘premature’ star anise louches that are over in an instant. Decent refractions and a nice green tinge at the edge of the glass.

Aroma- Fennel and anise dominate with a bit of ‘dirty sock’ funk that brings it down a notch

Flavor- Heavy on the fennel with the anise in equal measure. Decent wormwood bite mid palate. A nice creamy mouth feel is interrupted by some peppery aftertastes that are kind of annoying. I can detect the ‘saltiness’ as others have noted.

Finish- Lingers for a while but is nothing but pure anise. Doesn’t leave a sense of complexity in the mouth.

Overall- This is a decent verte and is a good place to start absinthe tasting. Decent value depending on where you buy it.
Overall rating 
 
3.2
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0
Reviewed by accountant July 21, 2009
Top 50 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (25)

Great Starter Absinthe

Color- Thin green. A little bit hazy as well. No sediment and it’s leaning towards a nice peridot.

Louche- It takes a while to develop and is a welcome change from some ‘premature’ star anise louches that are over in an instant. Decent refractions and a nice green tinge at the edge of the glass.

Aroma- Fennel and anise dominate with a bit of ‘dirty sock’ funk that brings it down a notch

Flavor- Heavy on the fennel with the anise in equal measure. Decent wormwood bite mid palate. A nice creamy mouth feel is interrupted by some peppery aftertastes that are kind of annoying. I can detect the ‘saltiness’ as others have noted.

Finish- Lingers for a while but is nothing but pure anise. Doesn’t leave a sense of complexity in the mouth.

Overall- This is a decent verte and is a good place to start absinthe tasting. Decent value depending on where you buy it.

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For my first experience with absinthe, I chose Lucid, partly due to its availability in my local stores, and partly because the general consensus here at WS and other sites was that it's a good absinthe to use as a baseline for judging more complex absinthes.

I purchased this bottle in December of 2008, and opened it here in mid-March 2009. Taking the advice of others, I let it air for about an hour before tasting. I had two glasses on the first night, then two glasses the following night, and I am basing my review primarily on the second tasting.

Color: The color was a nice golden peridot prior to loucheing. There was minimal haziness. After loucheing, the color changed to a pale peridot verging on yellow, but it was not unattractive.

Louche: The louche began almost immediately, being fully underway at a 1:1 ratio and over by about the 2:1 point. Nonetheless, the thin and wispy strands resulting from a fine fountain drip were enjoyable to watch, however brief they may have been. For a second glass, my less steady pour with a mini-carafe formed slightly thicker clouds.

Aroma: There was a pleasant mix of vibrant anise with a strong scent of fennel that fully opened up once the water drip began, but also diminished significantly at the 2:1 point.

Flavor: The flavor was not complex, and was a little less bitter than I expected it to be, but the simple combination of the 'holy trinity', along with a slight note of something almost like celery, was mild and refreshing. Granulated sugar detracted from my first glass, in that the sweetness was very pronounced at first and was followed by bitterness, but a half teaspoon of organic blue agave nectar in the second glass made for a much fuller and more-balanced taste.

Finish: The Lucid has a smooth, mild finish with only mild numbing at 3:1 or 4:1. The aftertaste lingers only briefly, but is pleasant.

Overall: After trying at various strengths, I found that around 3:1 or 3.5:1 was the best ratio for water to absinthe to bring out the best qualities of the Lucid. Anything above 4:1 results in a weak, watered down taste. While this absinthe has a fine flavor when completely unsweetened, I found that the agave nectar complimented it very well, and much better than granulated sugar. Some have said that the Lucid has been "oversimplified" for mild American tastes and that may be true, but I found it to be pleasant and refreshing, and would recommend it to anyone who wants an absinthe with a lower amount of bitterness.
Overall rating 
 
3.8
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0
Reviewed by jaysthename May 18, 2009
Last updated: May 18, 2009
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (19)

My first taste of absinthe is mild and pleasant

For my first experience with absinthe, I chose Lucid, partly due to its availability in my local stores, and partly because the general consensus here at WS and other sites was that it's a good absinthe to use as a baseline for judging more complex absinthes.

I purchased this bottle in December of 2008, and opened it here in mid-March 2009. Taking the advice of others, I let it air for about an hour before tasting. I had two glasses on the first night, then two glasses the following night, and I am basing my review primarily on the second tasting.

Color: The color was a nice golden peridot prior to loucheing. There was minimal haziness. After loucheing, the color changed to a pale peridot verging on yellow, but it was not unattractive.

Louche: The louche began almost immediately, being fully underway at a 1:1 ratio and over by about the 2:1 point. Nonetheless, the thin and wispy strands resulting from a fine fountain drip were enjoyable to watch, however brief they may have been. For a second glass, my less steady pour with a mini-carafe formed slightly thicker clouds.

Aroma: There was a pleasant mix of vibrant anise with a strong scent of fennel that fully opened up once the water drip began, but also diminished significantly at the 2:1 point.

Flavor: The flavor was not complex, and was a little less bitter than I expected it to be, but the simple combination of the 'holy trinity', along with a slight note of something almost like celery, was mild and refreshing. Granulated sugar detracted from my first glass, in that the sweetness was very pronounced at first and was followed by bitterness, but a half teaspoon of organic blue agave nectar in the second glass made for a much fuller and more-balanced taste.

Finish: The Lucid has a smooth, mild finish with only mild numbing at 3:1 or 4:1. The aftertaste lingers only briefly, but is pleasant.

Overall: After trying at various strengths, I found that around 3:1 or 3.5:1 was the best ratio for water to absinthe to bring out the best qualities of the Lucid. Anything above 4:1 results in a weak, watered down taste. While this absinthe has a fine flavor when completely unsweetened, I found that the agave nectar complimented it very well, and much better than granulated sugar. Some have said that the Lucid has been "oversimplified" for mild American tastes and that may be true, but I found it to be pleasant and refreshing, and would recommend it to anyone who wants an absinthe with a lower amount of bitterness.

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Admittedly, it has been just under a year since I finished my bottle of Lucid. However, since it was my first absinthe I wanted to share my thoughts. I have since tasted around 10 COs in my first year of absinthe, so my hindsight is thus colored. (Macerated?)

Bottle acquired February, 2007.

Color: I enjoyed Lucid's green. It was correct and not pale like some of the later batches, as noted by others.

Louche: I can't say it was opalescent, but I feel Lucid gave me an *excellent* introduction as to how a nice louche looks. Very enjoyable, and all my glasses were carafe pours.

Aroma: The transformation and opening up of absinthe's aroma upon the addition of water was another thing I that endeared me to the drink as a complete novice. As the bottle of Lucid aged, I enjoyed the aroma even more.

Flavor: Though I can't disrespect Lucid because it was my first, it hadn't totally convinced me that absinthe's flavor was "for me." Almost. Kubler, my second, would clinch it. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the "licorice" talk was inaccurate, due to the crisper, herbal, and far less cloying flavor of anise. I enjoyed the subtle bitterness of the wormwood, and was glad it wasn't front and center for my first experience. (I'm still somewhat of a bitterness wus.) However, the strong black pepper-like flavor really got in the way. I do not have fond memories of it at all; it even overshadows the "murky" aspect to the flavor that others have noted. My distaste for this pepper note may mean I'm not a fan of coriander, but I can't be sure. The murkiness felt like a sort of barrier preventing me from fully experiencing the herbs.

Finish: I was struck by the milkiness of absinthe, and am happy to have had Lucid introduce me to this. I don't recall the immediate finish after a sip, but recall really enjoying the flavors staying with me for an hour or two after I had finished the glass.

Overall: Here is where we catapult back into the present. It is an excellent starter absinthe, not too complex, has all the right components, and is well-made. The bottle only got better as it aged, but that pepper note was still there. Lucid will always have a place in my heart having been my first, but since my absinthe explorations have taken me elsewhere, I can't envision buying another bottle in the near future. It's not my first choice, but I would not refuse it if offered.
Overall rating 
 
3.6
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
3.0
Reviewed by scuto March 04, 2009
Last updated: March 04, 2009
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (9)

My very first, from memory.

Admittedly, it has been just under a year since I finished my bottle of Lucid. However, since it was my first absinthe I wanted to share my thoughts. I have since tasted around 10 COs in my first year of absinthe, so my hindsight is thus colored. (Macerated?)

Bottle acquired February, 2007.

Color: I enjoyed Lucid's green. It was correct and not pale like some of the later batches, as noted by others.

Louche: I can't say it was opalescent, but I feel Lucid gave me an *excellent* introduction as to how a nice louche looks. Very enjoyable, and all my glasses were carafe pours.

Aroma: The transformation and opening up of absinthe's aroma upon the addition of water was another thing I that endeared me to the drink as a complete novice. As the bottle of Lucid aged, I enjoyed the aroma even more.

Flavor: Though I can't disrespect Lucid because it was my first, it hadn't totally convinced me that absinthe's flavor was "for me." Almost. Kubler, my second, would clinch it. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the "licorice" talk was inaccurate, due to the crisper, herbal, and far less cloying flavor of anise. I enjoyed the subtle bitterness of the wormwood, and was glad it wasn't front and center for my first experience. (I'm still somewhat of a bitterness wus.) However, the strong black pepper-like flavor really got in the way. I do not have fond memories of it at all; it even overshadows the "murky" aspect to the flavor that others have noted. My distaste for this pepper note may mean I'm not a fan of coriander, but I can't be sure. The murkiness felt like a sort of barrier preventing me from fully experiencing the herbs.

Finish: I was struck by the milkiness of absinthe, and am happy to have had Lucid introduce me to this. I don't recall the immediate finish after a sip, but recall really enjoying the flavors staying with me for an hour or two after I had finished the glass.

Overall: Here is where we catapult back into the present. It is an excellent starter absinthe, not too complex, has all the right components, and is well-made. The bottle only got better as it aged, but that pepper note was still there. Lucid will always have a place in my heart having been my first, but since my absinthe explorations have taken me elsewhere, I can't envision buying another bottle in the near future. It's not my first choice, but I would not refuse it if offered.

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What you really want to know: No, you won't go wrong buying a bottle. Very much worth it. If available, look for the gift set that includes two nice reservoir glasses and a spoon for the same price as a bottle ($57 USD). Overall, you can get better, but it's far from being a low-grade disappointment. Good basic absinthe that will stay stocked on my shelf. If I had to sum it up in a word, it would be "natural." If you're the kind of person who thinks a woman smells better with a pint of perfume and looks better with two hours of makeup than when she first steps out of the shower, this might not be the drink for you; stick to Pernod or Absente.

Color - Light olive... in fact, perhaps a bit too light, but I was very pleased to see no use of artificial dyes. I don't like my absinthe to wear makeup. Natural and correct. Almost, but not quite, a 4 rating. Had it been artificial, I never would have rated it above a 1.

Louche - Immediate, nice oily trails at first, good blossom of the louche. Like the color, though, the louche is a bit light; doesn't quite hit the opalescense that I was expecting.

Aroma - Very nice. If you're used to a pastis like Pernod, or other substitutes like Razzouk Arak, you will be very pleasantly surprised with its complexity, both before and after water. It's not the most complex, but there are some definitely interesting and correct notes. Predominately anise and fennel, of course, with a decently forward wormwood nose and something definitive about it - couldn't quite discern if it was coriander or perhaps cumin. Not much of a floral bouquet, but very interesting and spicy.

Flavor - Enough of a coriander and wormwood nose that there was a pleasant herbal taste, almost a hint of celery, but not grassy. Of course, coriander sometimes gives the illusion of saltiness, but it wasn't overly powerful, just enjoyable. A huge step up from the one-dimensional taste of Absente, Pernod, or Razzouk. Each taste was a bit of an experiment, trying to put words to exactly what was being tasted. If I had to identify room for improvement (and to be honest, I would definitely not characterize the experience as a disappointing one overall) it would be the relative lack of some of the more floral notes in both the aroma and flavor. Still, a flavor that kept me intrigued and ready for the next sip.

Finish - Spicy, herbal (think gourmet cooking spice, not floral candle shop) pleasant aftertaste that lingered just long enough. For my second glass, I added a bit more water to 4:1, the better to lighten the alcohol and try to separate the flavors.

Overall - Heads and tails above any of the pastis or other absinthe "substitutes." I like pastis and arak for what they are, but this is a very positive and uniquely absinthian experience. Also, hands down, better than anything I've gotten off the shelf in the US as of the end of 2008. I haven't yet tried the other T.A. Breaux designs (the Jade line), but if they really are quite pleasantly superior to Lucid, I suspect I'll be extremely happy with them even at a higher price. I'll be buying Lucid again soon (unfortunately, probably very soon, as it seems I'm going through it a bit quickly - a tribute to its interesting character.)

Overall rating 
 
3.7
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0
Reviewed by beowulfgang December 30, 2008
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A Pleasant Experience...

What you really want to know: No, you won't go wrong buying a bottle. Very much worth it. If available, look for the gift set that includes two nice reservoir glasses and a spoon for the same price as a bottle ($57 USD). Overall, you can get better, but it's far from being a low-grade disappointment. Good basic absinthe that will stay stocked on my shelf. If I had to sum it up in a word, it would be "natural." If you're the kind of person who thinks a woman smells better with a pint of perfume and looks better with two hours of makeup than when she first steps out of the shower, this might not be the drink for you; stick to Pernod or Absente.

Color - Light olive... in fact, perhaps a bit too light, but I was very pleased to see no use of artificial dyes. I don't like my absinthe to wear makeup. Natural and correct. Almost, but not quite, a 4 rating. Had it been artificial, I never would have rated it above a 1.

Louche - Immediate, nice oily trails at first, good blossom of the louche. Like the color, though, the louche is a bit light; doesn't quite hit the opalescense that I was expecting.

Aroma - Very nice. If you're used to a pastis like Pernod, or other substitutes like Razzouk Arak, you will be very pleasantly surprised with its complexity, both before and after water. It's not the most complex, but there are some definitely interesting and correct notes. Predominately anise and fennel, of course, with a decently forward wormwood nose and something definitive about it - couldn't quite discern if it was coriander or perhaps cumin. Not much of a floral bouquet, but very interesting and spicy.

Flavor - Enough of a coriander and wormwood nose that there was a pleasant herbal taste, almost a hint of celery, but not grassy. Of course, coriander sometimes gives the illusion of saltiness, but it wasn't overly powerful, just enjoyable. A huge step up from the one-dimensional taste of Absente, Pernod, or Razzouk. Each taste was a bit of an experiment, trying to put words to exactly what was being tasted. If I had to identify room for improvement (and to be honest, I would definitely not characterize the experience as a disappointing one overall) it would be the relative lack of some of the more floral notes in both the aroma and flavor. Still, a flavor that kept me intrigued and ready for the next sip.

Finish - Spicy, herbal (think gourmet cooking spice, not floral candle shop) pleasant aftertaste that lingered just long enough. For my second glass, I added a bit more water to 4:1, the better to lighten the alcohol and try to separate the flavors.

Overall - Heads and tails above any of the pastis or other absinthe "substitutes." I like pastis and arak for what they are, but this is a very positive and uniquely absinthian experience. Also, hands down, better than anything I've gotten off the shelf in the US as of the end of 2008. I haven't yet tried the other T.A. Breaux designs (the Jade line), but if they really are quite pleasantly superior to Lucid, I suspect I'll be extremely happy with them even at a higher price. I'll be buying Lucid again soon (unfortunately, probably very soon, as it seems I'm going through it a bit quickly - a tribute to its interesting character.)

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This is a solid absinthe with a nice aroma, a reasonably well-rounded flavor and a decent louche.

Prepared 3:1 (water: absinthe), one sugar cube on a slow drip.

The pre-louche color is a bit yellow; fairly unremarkable, but not off-putting by any means. One thing I will say is that, to their credit, Lucid does not use artificial colorings as some new absinthe makers seem to be doing.

The pre-louche aroma indicates a healthy dose of fennel with a well-balanced anise scent, a powerful, sweet, nutty overtone, - almost caramel - and a nice, detectable waft of wormwood; some subtle spice and a pleasing bouquet of meadow herbs. Overall a very pleasing aroma. Post-louche the scent mellowed out a bit, and was more balanced, but also more subtle. Personally, I enjoyed the strength of the pre-louche aroma.

The louche begins with a delicate, oily “dance” and is not too quick. End result is a traditional looking opalescent with some nice subtleties in the light. Nice, even, heavy legs.

The flavor is well-rounded with plenty of detectable wormwood, some lingering anise and a bit of spice in conclusion at the back of the tongue. All told, a balanced, ‘fresh’ taste, light and crisp.

The finish is smooth, with no abuse to the tongue. I did, however, detect a somewhat strange, unidentifiable aftertaste accompanying the anise after about ¾ of the glass had been finished. This didn’t ruin the drink by any means, but caused the raising of an eyebrow. I can’t place what the taste is, but it’s ever so slightly “rubbery.”

I would say that this is definitely a strong absinthe for the US market at this point – probably the best verte widely available in the States. The other labels most commonly available now in the US – as of 12/2008 – are the Kubler (a good blanche, though I am personally not a huge fan), the pathetic Pernod remake, and the highly offensive Le Tourment Verte. If you’re buying locally somewhere in the States, are partial to vertes, and this is the lot you have to choose from, Lucid is certainly your best bet. As others have noted, this is a good introduction for the US market, and will hopefully become a baseline standard for American absinthe drinkers. We may all pray that US liquor stores start stocking Jade PF or Eichelberger at some point, but until then Lucid is a better-than-acceptable placeholder.
Overall rating 
 
3.7
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
4.0
Reviewed by tomecide December 13, 2008
Top 1000 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (3)

A Solid Absinthe for the US Market

This is a solid absinthe with a nice aroma, a reasonably well-rounded flavor and a decent louche.

Prepared 3:1 (water: absinthe), one sugar cube on a slow drip.

The pre-louche color is a bit yellow; fairly unremarkable, but not off-putting by any means. One thing I will say is that, to their credit, Lucid does not use artificial colorings as some new absinthe makers seem to be doing.

The pre-louche aroma indicates a healthy dose of fennel with a well-balanced anise scent, a powerful, sweet, nutty overtone, - almost caramel - and a nice, detectable waft of wormwood; some subtle spice and a pleasing bouquet of meadow herbs. Overall a very pleasing aroma. Post-louche the scent mellowed out a bit, and was more balanced, but also more subtle. Personally, I enjoyed the strength of the pre-louche aroma.

The louche begins with a delicate, oily “dance” and is not too quick. End result is a traditional looking opalescent with some nice subtleties in the light. Nice, even, heavy legs.

The flavor is well-rounded with plenty of detectable wormwood, some lingering anise and a bit of spice in conclusion at the back of the tongue. All told, a balanced, ‘fresh’ taste, light and crisp.

The finish is smooth, with no abuse to the tongue. I did, however, detect a somewhat strange, unidentifiable aftertaste accompanying the anise after about ¾ of the glass had been finished. This didn’t ruin the drink by any means, but caused the raising of an eyebrow. I can’t place what the taste is, but it’s ever so slightly “rubbery.”

I would say that this is definitely a strong absinthe for the US market at this point – probably the best verte widely available in the States. The other labels most commonly available now in the US – as of 12/2008 – are the Kubler (a good blanche, though I am personally not a huge fan), the pathetic Pernod remake, and the highly offensive Le Tourment Verte. If you’re buying locally somewhere in the States, are partial to vertes, and this is the lot you have to choose from, Lucid is certainly your best bet. As others have noted, this is a good introduction for the US market, and will hopefully become a baseline standard for American absinthe drinkers. We may all pray that US liquor stores start stocking Jade PF or Eichelberger at some point, but until then Lucid is a better-than-acceptable placeholder.

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Dose was 40ml to 200ml of chilled water.

Color: I have purchased several bottles of Lucid. There is some inconsistency in the color. For this review, the color happened to be a pale yellowish-green, slightly cloudy, but I have had others where it is more green and clearer. Rather than a count against, I take this as a by-product of natural techniques applied.

Louche: I drip water from a measuring cup that has a "beaker-like" protrusion for pouring. The louche forms quickly from the bottom, and larger *blop* drops of water burst into clouds, as opposed to bursting into tangles of trails. So the louche is faster forming than some, but with nice refractive attributes and that "what color *is* that?" kind of green/greyish/amber hue.

Aroma: Pre-louche, it is somewhat strongly alcohol but with kind of a "smoky" melange around an anise core. Post-louche: I love this aroma. It is anise but subdued by a heady mixture, which seems to be that smokiness "exploded". That mixture... I live on a farm, in the spring, the meadow air has components of this aroma: that combination of flowery and weedy and grassy and woody. In this case, I am weighing more heavily in favor of the post-louche aroma with the number rating, because pre-louche is fairly harshly alcohol. Smelling the louched glass is almost as nice as drinking from it.

Flavor: Louched, I bring it up for a sip, and the combination of aroma and flavor reminds me of my great-grandmother's house. Is this because she was alive during the Belle Epoch? Because you don't just taste an alcoholic drink, you smell and taste it at once. Her house had a potpourri aroma mingled with a mixture of dusty antiquity and brass. Knickknacks everywhere, a clutter, but her ancient and thickly bespectacled visage also provided a focus, as the anise does in this flavor.


Finish: Yes, there is a murkiness, an indeteriminant jumble, like the items cluttering the shelves, and this fades behind the gentle insistence of the wormwood, but also a sweet clarity in the integration of the anise. The pressed meadow foliage reconstituted in the louche, tethered by the wormwood, dancing around that sweet anise maypole, fading softly into light anise notes as the wormwood dances up just slight into the sinuses! Did I mention I was slightly biased in the title of this review!?!

Overall: Ok, ok. So I have not tasted the greats of antiquity. The sole "solid 4" rating among these reviews that I have experienced is Kubler 53, and I would rate it higher than Lucid. But there is obviously a crafted effort that has gone into this liquor that surpasses an artful bottle and cashing in on the absinthe mystique. The sweetness of the anise, and the numbing of the wormwood is nicely balanced, with a host of herbal flavors that are at times maybe murkily tangled, but not unpleasantly so. The only real "dings" in the experience as I see them would be the aroma as poured out of the bottle, and some inconsistency in the coloration.

Overall rating 
 
3.5
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
3.0
Reviewed by Loosher November 24, 2008
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (5)

Somewhat biased, as this was my first *sigh*

Dose was 40ml to 200ml of chilled water.

Color: I have purchased several bottles of Lucid. There is some inconsistency in the color. For this review, the color happened to be a pale yellowish-green, slightly cloudy, but I have had others where it is more green and clearer. Rather than a count against, I take this as a by-product of natural techniques applied.

Louche: I drip water from a measuring cup that has a "beaker-like" protrusion for pouring. The louche forms quickly from the bottom, and larger *blop* drops of water burst into clouds, as opposed to bursting into tangles of trails. So the louche is faster forming than some, but with nice refractive attributes and that "what color *is* that?" kind of green/greyish/amber hue.

Aroma: Pre-louche, it is somewhat strongly alcohol but with kind of a "smoky" melange around an anise core. Post-louche: I love this aroma. It is anise but subdued by a heady mixture, which seems to be that smokiness "exploded". That mixture... I live on a farm, in the spring, the meadow air has components of this aroma: that combination of flowery and weedy and grassy and woody. In this case, I am weighing more heavily in favor of the post-louche aroma with the number rating, because pre-louche is fairly harshly alcohol. Smelling the louched glass is almost as nice as drinking from it.

Flavor: Louched, I bring it up for a sip, and the combination of aroma and flavor reminds me of my great-grandmother's house. Is this because she was alive during the Belle Epoch? Because you don't just taste an alcoholic drink, you smell and taste it at once. Her house had a potpourri aroma mingled with a mixture of dusty antiquity and brass. Knickknacks everywhere, a clutter, but her ancient and thickly bespectacled visage also provided a focus, as the anise does in this flavor.


Finish: Yes, there is a murkiness, an indeteriminant jumble, like the items cluttering the shelves, and this fades behind the gentle insistence of the wormwood, but also a sweet clarity in the integration of the anise. The pressed meadow foliage reconstituted in the louche, tethered by the wormwood, dancing around that sweet anise maypole, fading softly into light anise notes as the wormwood dances up just slight into the sinuses! Did I mention I was slightly biased in the title of this review!?!

Overall: Ok, ok. So I have not tasted the greats of antiquity. The sole "solid 4" rating among these reviews that I have experienced is Kubler 53, and I would rate it higher than Lucid. But there is obviously a crafted effort that has gone into this liquor that surpasses an artful bottle and cashing in on the absinthe mystique. The sweetness of the anise, and the numbing of the wormwood is nicely balanced, with a host of herbal flavors that are at times maybe murkily tangled, but not unpleasantly so. The only real "dings" in the experience as I see them would be the aroma as poured out of the bottle, and some inconsistency in the coloration.

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I haven't had a bottle of Lucid in the house for some time, so I took the occasion of its new local availability to buy some and hence, to review it in the light of some other similarly priced absinthes I've had recently.



Color - Lighter than I remember, but certainly the correct hue for a verte.



Louche - One of the strong points of this absinthe, Lucid produces a substantial louche that rolls like the fog over the bay, just like it should, while leaving a clearly defined green layer just until the very end.



Aroma - Perhaps the weakest aspect of this absinthe, it has an appropriately spicy nose that hits the right fresh herbal notes, marred only by the occasional whiff of something akin to burnt plastic.



Flavor - Ultimately I drink Lucid for the flavor, which as many have said by now, is "Jade-light" in nature. Well balanced and clean, without any surprises for me.



Finish - Dry, light, and, although clean, presents the merest hint of a "funk" that I can easily look past.



Overall, if Jade Edouard represents to me the essence of what an absinthe should be, then Lucid reflects, through it's maker perhaps, enough of that essence to be a good value given it's ready availability.
Overall rating 
 
3.7
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
4.0
Reviewed by speedle June 21, 2008
Top 100 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (9)

Good everyday absinthe, an authentic introduction

I haven't had a bottle of Lucid in the house for some time, so I took the occasion of its new local availability to buy some and hence, to review it in the light of some other similarly priced absinthes I've had recently.



Color - Lighter than I remember, but certainly the correct hue for a verte.



Louche - One of the strong points of this absinthe, Lucid produces a substantial louche that rolls like the fog over the bay, just like it should, while leaving a clearly defined green layer just until the very end.



Aroma - Perhaps the weakest aspect of this absinthe, it has an appropriately spicy nose that hits the right fresh herbal notes, marred only by the occasional whiff of something akin to burnt plastic.



Flavor - Ultimately I drink Lucid for the flavor, which as many have said by now, is "Jade-light" in nature. Well balanced and clean, without any surprises for me.



Finish - Dry, light, and, although clean, presents the merest hint of a "funk" that I can easily look past.



Overall, if Jade Edouard represents to me the essence of what an absinthe should be, then Lucid reflects, through it's maker perhaps, enough of that essence to be a good value given it's ready availability.

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Color: Light olive. Somewhat dull and unremarkable but looks natural. After louche the color is murky, like dishwater.



Louche: The louche begins forming immediately. It could be thicker, but I wouldn't describe it as thin. It never becomes opaque. Not very attractive.



Aroma: Something immediately strikes me as "off" in the aroma. Not something I'd describe as clean. I find the peppery notes a bit distracting as well, but not all bad. Perhaps just a bit too heavy handed. The wormwood presence is more forward than I expected. And of course the predominant note is anise, no surprise there.



Flavor: Again I'm getting something I can only describe as "murky". It's pretty flat and uninteresting, like a light American beer. No flavors really jump out on my palate and demand my attention. Not very complex. I get that anise and underlying wormwood, along with the peppery presence.



Finish: The fennel becomes more noticeable in the finish along with a slight wormwood bitterness. Lingering but I wouldn't describe the duration as long.



Overall: I know that this is a quality made product, which is what I want to see entering the U.S. market. I'm just not a fan of this particular brand. I wonder if Ted attempted to cater to what we all know about the typical American beer preference (bland, watered down) when crafting this? This absinthe is to American beer as his Jades are to a full bodied ale.
Overall rating 
 
2.6
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
2.0
Reviewed by Tally Ho June 09, 2008
Top 100 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (12)

An American beer drinkers absinthe

Color: Light olive. Somewhat dull and unremarkable but looks natural. After louche the color is murky, like dishwater.



Louche: The louche begins forming immediately. It could be thicker, but I wouldn't describe it as thin. It never becomes opaque. Not very attractive.



Aroma: Something immediately strikes me as "off" in the aroma. Not something I'd describe as clean. I find the peppery notes a bit distracting as well, but not all bad. Perhaps just a bit too heavy handed. The wormwood presence is more forward than I expected. And of course the predominant note is anise, no surprise there.



Flavor: Again I'm getting something I can only describe as "murky". It's pretty flat and uninteresting, like a light American beer. No flavors really jump out on my palate and demand my attention. Not very complex. I get that anise and underlying wormwood, along with the peppery presence.



Finish: The fennel becomes more noticeable in the finish along with a slight wormwood bitterness. Lingering but I wouldn't describe the duration as long.



Overall: I know that this is a quality made product, which is what I want to see entering the U.S. market. I'm just not a fan of this particular brand. I wonder if Ted attempted to cater to what we all know about the typical American beer preference (bland, watered down) when crafting this? This absinthe is to American beer as his Jades are to a full bodied ale.

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Being a fan of the "Jade" line of Absinthe, I find it unfortunate that Lucid didn't expand upon it, but I suppose it might be understandable that the first US absinthe would try to play things a little on the safe side.



I found the color on the light side, and the flavor not as complex as I would like. But the louche was good, and it did have a fairly nice nose to it.



I don't see anything specifically flawed about Lucid, aside from the fact that it isn't as good as I know it could be. If you are wanting a gentle introduction to absinthe, then you could do far worse than Lucid.
Overall rating 
 
3.3
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0
Reviewed by DrinkBoy June 07, 2008
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (2)

A reasonable introduction.

Being a fan of the "Jade" line of Absinthe, I find it unfortunate that Lucid didn't expand upon it, but I suppose it might be understandable that the first US absinthe would try to play things a little on the safe side.



I found the color on the light side, and the flavor not as complex as I would like. But the louche was good, and it did have a fairly nice nose to it.



I don't see anything specifically flawed about Lucid, aside from the fact that it isn't as good as I know it could be. If you are wanting a gentle introduction to absinthe, then you could do far worse than Lucid.

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