Review Detail

 
All Product Reviews » Vintage Absinthe
Appearance: A wonderful fuille morte. If you didn't know, you would think it was cognac from across the room. No sediment. Jewel-like.

Louche: Quick to louche, being completely formed by 1:1. The final product is opalescent, with tobacco hues interspersed with peach and white. Very pretty.

Aroma: Lots of fine oiled leather and old books, with anise at the forefront, followed by a hint of fennel and the mintiness of the wormwood. Sugary confections throughout the entire experience.

Flavor and mouthfeel: Coats the tongue wonderfully, but isn't as thick as something like Pernod Fils or H. Basinet. Not particularly complex (not surprising based on the age of the recipe), but very well balanced. It's quite refreshing and light, with anise being prominant and vegetal underpinnings from the fennel. The wormwood follows up at the end with a nice, bracing finish. Not overly bitter, but pleasantly astringent.

Finish: Anise lingers, but not as long as some of the other, more anise-heavy vintage brands. The wormwood again asserts itself at the end. It's a bit more astringent than I'd like, but I could see the addition of sugar (as was the norm at the time) rounding out the flavors nicely. Alas, I can't bring myself to adulterate this fine beverage with sugar, so I'll have to leave that as a guess.

Overall: A wonderful treat from one of the oldest Absinthe distilleries ever to exist. A great insight into the beginnings of the absinthe industry.
Overall rating 
 
4.8
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.5
Finish 
 
4.5
Overall 
 
4.5
Reviewed by Brian Robinson May 02, 2013
#1 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (165)

A rare treat

Appearance: A wonderful fuille morte. If you didn't know, you would think it was cognac from across the room. No sediment. Jewel-like.

Louche: Quick to louche, being completely formed by 1:1. The final product is opalescent, with tobacco hues interspersed with peach and white. Very pretty.

Aroma: Lots of fine oiled leather and old books, with anise at the forefront, followed by a hint of fennel and the mintiness of the wormwood. Sugary confections throughout the entire experience.

Flavor and mouthfeel: Coats the tongue wonderfully, but isn't as thick as something like Pernod Fils or H. Basinet. Not particularly complex (not surprising based on the age of the recipe), but very well balanced. It's quite refreshing and light, with anise being prominant and vegetal underpinnings from the fennel. The wormwood follows up at the end with a nice, bracing finish. Not overly bitter, but pleasantly astringent.

Finish: Anise lingers, but not as long as some of the other, more anise-heavy vintage brands. The wormwood again asserts itself at the end. It's a bit more astringent than I'd like, but I could see the addition of sugar (as was the norm at the time) rounding out the flavors nicely. Alas, I can't bring myself to adulterate this fine beverage with sugar, so I'll have to leave that as a guess.

Overall: A wonderful treat from one of the oldest Absinthe distilleries ever to exist. A great insight into the beginnings of the absinthe industry.

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