Review Detail

 
All Product Reviews » Traditional Absinthe
Color: Barrel aging has taken the vibrant peridot green of the original and toned it down a bit, without creating a full fuille morte effect. Inviting.
Louche: as with the original, a nice build, leading to a well formed, deep louche with hints of yellow and white with touches of brown
Aroma: anise is still prominant with fennel, veronica, and wormwood as supporting players. I still get the tea aromas as well, but this time they are complimented by an underlying sweetness that is reminiscent of mallow flowers.
Flavor/Mouthfeel: Mouth coating and still not too thick. The wormwood has definitely been toned down by the barrel aging, an effect I've also noticed when making barrel aged bitters. It smooths it out, leaving the flavors without as much astringency.
Finish: wormwood and anise, but accompanied by a slight tannic dryness brought on by the barrels.
Overall: A very interesting riff on the original. Barrel aging can certainly play a decisive roll in rounding out flavors. Grab bottles (or samples) of both and experience the differences that wood can bring to the experience. I enjoyed it.
Overall rating 
 
4.1
Appearance 
 
4.5
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0
Reviewed by Brian Robinson July 04, 2013
Last updated: July 04, 2013
#1 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (165)

barrel aging has added some interesting qualities

Color: Barrel aging has taken the vibrant peridot green of the original and toned it down a bit, without creating a full fuille morte effect. Inviting.
Louche: as with the original, a nice build, leading to a well formed, deep louche with hints of yellow and white with touches of brown
Aroma: anise is still prominant with fennel, veronica, and wormwood as supporting players. I still get the tea aromas as well, but this time they are complimented by an underlying sweetness that is reminiscent of mallow flowers.
Flavor/Mouthfeel: Mouth coating and still not too thick. The wormwood has definitely been toned down by the barrel aging, an effect I've also noticed when making barrel aged bitters. It smooths it out, leaving the flavors without as much astringency.
Finish: wormwood and anise, but accompanied by a slight tannic dryness brought on by the barrels.
Overall: A very interesting riff on the original. Barrel aging can certainly play a decisive roll in rounding out flavors. Grab bottles (or samples) of both and experience the differences that wood can bring to the experience. I enjoyed it.

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