Review Detail

 
All Product Reviews » Traditional Absinthe
-Color-
Though I know it’s artificially colored, this is one of the best artificial colors I’ve seen; the mid-peridot could pass for some of the more vivid naturally colored vertes; the latest range of offerings from Emile Pernot comes to mind. Retains its natural look after water; I’d give most artificial colors a 1 or 2, but this one manages a 3.

-Louche-
Louche starts out nice, but then is over a bit too quickly, as one would expect from a product with a high amount of star anise oil. Louched opacity on the thick side, but not any worse than some well made green anise based brands.

-Aroma-
Before Water: Black jelly bean and alcohol heat.

After Water: Strong black jelly bean aroma with a little weird woody medicinal nuance. Nothing downright offensive so I guess it gets a 2.

-Flavor and Mouthfeel-
Oh dear. Sickly sweet light licorice flavor with some minor spice and weird plastic notes. I was expecting an all-out star anise saturation a la Grande Absente but the sickly and weird flavors make this a bit worse. Blunt bitterness and maybe a little mint from the wormwood. While I’ve tasted a few good vertes with the same bitterness power, quality A.a. when properly handled will have a much greater range than this; in addition, the wormwood flavor that IS here does not sync with the rest of the notes. Not much body to speak of one way or another.

-Finish-
Blunt, dry bitterness from the A. a. with a bit of spice. The receding flavors are a relief rather than a savory send off.

-Overall-
As discussed many times before on the serious absinthe forums, it’s a real pity that this beverage carries the Pernod Absinthe name. While it technically qualifies as real absinthe by historical measures (the lowest possible grade of absinthe and cheapest production methods), it has very little to do with the gold standard of all absinthe, pre-ban Pernod Fils. It’s unfortunate, though predictable, to see the Pernod-Ricard megacorporation attempt to link their product to Pernod’s glory days. I’ve been lucky enough to get to know the real thing (1910 Palazzo cache, 1910 Winnetka cache, 1914 Holland “very green” cache, Tarragona c.1940-50 and c. 1950-1960) and Senator you’re no Pernod Fils!

Notes: 3.5:1, no sugar. Got a little better as the glass warmed up, but I ended up sinking the remainder of the glass. Not trying to be a snob, but honestly I found this drink to be unpleasant.
Overall rating 
 
2.1
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
2.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
1.5
Finish 
 
1.5
Overall 
 
1.5
Reviewed by Green Baron April 30, 2013
Last updated: May 03, 2013
Top 50 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (26)

Senator you’re no Pernod Fils!

-Color-
Though I know it’s artificially colored, this is one of the best artificial colors I’ve seen; the mid-peridot could pass for some of the more vivid naturally colored vertes; the latest range of offerings from Emile Pernot comes to mind. Retains its natural look after water; I’d give most artificial colors a 1 or 2, but this one manages a 3.

-Louche-
Louche starts out nice, but then is over a bit too quickly, as one would expect from a product with a high amount of star anise oil. Louched opacity on the thick side, but not any worse than some well made green anise based brands.

-Aroma-
Before Water: Black jelly bean and alcohol heat.

After Water: Strong black jelly bean aroma with a little weird woody medicinal nuance. Nothing downright offensive so I guess it gets a 2.

-Flavor and Mouthfeel-
Oh dear. Sickly sweet light licorice flavor with some minor spice and weird plastic notes. I was expecting an all-out star anise saturation a la Grande Absente but the sickly and weird flavors make this a bit worse. Blunt bitterness and maybe a little mint from the wormwood. While I’ve tasted a few good vertes with the same bitterness power, quality A.a. when properly handled will have a much greater range than this; in addition, the wormwood flavor that IS here does not sync with the rest of the notes. Not much body to speak of one way or another.

-Finish-
Blunt, dry bitterness from the A. a. with a bit of spice. The receding flavors are a relief rather than a savory send off.

-Overall-
As discussed many times before on the serious absinthe forums, it’s a real pity that this beverage carries the Pernod Absinthe name. While it technically qualifies as real absinthe by historical measures (the lowest possible grade of absinthe and cheapest production methods), it has very little to do with the gold standard of all absinthe, pre-ban Pernod Fils. It’s unfortunate, though predictable, to see the Pernod-Ricard megacorporation attempt to link their product to Pernod’s glory days. I’ve been lucky enough to get to know the real thing (1910 Palazzo cache, 1910 Winnetka cache, 1914 Holland “very green” cache, Tarragona c.1940-50 and c. 1950-1960) and Senator you’re no Pernod Fils!

Notes: 3.5:1, no sugar. Got a little better as the glass warmed up, but I ended up sinking the remainder of the glass. Not trying to be a snob, but honestly I found this drink to be unpleasant.

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