Review Detail

 
All Product Reviews » Traditional Absinthe
Appearance
Very nice light peridot green. A bit paler than I'd like, but absolutely clear and natural looking. The clarity is particularly impressive for an unfiltered absinthe. I've worked my way through a goodly portion of the bottle, and there is zero sign of sediment.

Louche
Although not the most gradual of louches, I don't find it to be as "quick" as a few other tasters who have commented on it. There are some nice swirling tendrils as it forms, if not exactly rolling fog banks. The final result stops short of opaque, and is reminiscent of mother of pearl that has lost most of its fire. Nonetheless, there is a smidgeon of opalescence, if one gazes at the louche in the right light.

Aroma
This is where Blues Cat really begins to shine. Fennel is the foremost ingredient, followed by a candied anise, and some woodsy qualities (I don't specifically pick out wormwood, at least neat).

Louched, Blues Cat really opens up and blossoms. Fennel is still the lead player, followed by the anise, but the woodsy earthiness is wrapped in a very fragrant alpine floral bouquet that completely fills a room. I actually walked out of another room, and had to be about twenty feet away, when I was startled by that wonderful scent.

Like its similarly earthy counterpart Ridge Verte, Blues Cat really stands up to water. I usually like my absinthe fairly dense, but I found my typical 3-4:1 dilution ratio to be a bit too concentrated to allow all the wonderful flavors to take wing, and I settled on 4-5:1 as my ideal here.

Flavor/Mouthfeel
An absolutely beautiful balance of fragrant, fruity fennel (still just a tad in the forefront), that wonderful candied anise, minty wormwood and other wildflowers, just the right touch of citrus, and something almost like chanterelle mushrooms.

Finish
The finish is incredibly lengthy without much change from the initial flavor. I agree with Michael Meyers that there is a powdery buildup that leaves one's mouth feeling a bit cluttered by the time the end of a glass is reached. However, for me, the flavor is such a beguiling combination of sweet, perfumy, and savory, that I actually enjoy the cumulative effect, hence my score of a 4.5.

Overall
Already a thing of beauty, and very balanced for its age, Blues Cat is still quite young, and there is definitely some room for the various components to further meld and soften with age. If this occurs, I feel there is an excellent chance that it will become my absolute go-to commercial offering. In any case, I fervently hope it becomes a "regular" product in the Delaware Phoenix lineup.
Overall rating 
 
4.5
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
4.5
Overall 
 
4.5
Reviewed by Absomphe May 29, 2012
Last updated: May 22, 2014
Top 10 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (26)

This Cat Shouldn't Have Anyone Singing The Blues

Appearance
Very nice light peridot green. A bit paler than I'd like, but absolutely clear and natural looking. The clarity is particularly impressive for an unfiltered absinthe. I've worked my way through a goodly portion of the bottle, and there is zero sign of sediment.

Louche
Although not the most gradual of louches, I don't find it to be as "quick" as a few other tasters who have commented on it. There are some nice swirling tendrils as it forms, if not exactly rolling fog banks. The final result stops short of opaque, and is reminiscent of mother of pearl that has lost most of its fire. Nonetheless, there is a smidgeon of opalescence, if one gazes at the louche in the right light.

Aroma
This is where Blues Cat really begins to shine. Fennel is the foremost ingredient, followed by a candied anise, and some woodsy qualities (I don't specifically pick out wormwood, at least neat).

Louched, Blues Cat really opens up and blossoms. Fennel is still the lead player, followed by the anise, but the woodsy earthiness is wrapped in a very fragrant alpine floral bouquet that completely fills a room. I actually walked out of another room, and had to be about twenty feet away, when I was startled by that wonderful scent.

Like its similarly earthy counterpart Ridge Verte, Blues Cat really stands up to water. I usually like my absinthe fairly dense, but I found my typical 3-4:1 dilution ratio to be a bit too concentrated to allow all the wonderful flavors to take wing, and I settled on 4-5:1 as my ideal here.

Flavor/Mouthfeel
An absolutely beautiful balance of fragrant, fruity fennel (still just a tad in the forefront), that wonderful candied anise, minty wormwood and other wildflowers, just the right touch of citrus, and something almost like chanterelle mushrooms.

Finish
The finish is incredibly lengthy without much change from the initial flavor. I agree with Michael Meyers that there is a powdery buildup that leaves one's mouth feeling a bit cluttered by the time the end of a glass is reached. However, for me, the flavor is such a beguiling combination of sweet, perfumy, and savory, that I actually enjoy the cumulative effect, hence my score of a 4.5.

Overall
Already a thing of beauty, and very balanced for its age, Blues Cat is still quite young, and there is definitely some room for the various components to further meld and soften with age. If this occurs, I feel there is an excellent chance that it will become my absolute go-to commercial offering. In any case, I fervently hope it becomes a "regular" product in the Delaware Phoenix lineup.

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Written by eskay
June 07, 2012
Great insights from a wordsmith. A pleasure to read.
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